2

I have the following classes

    public class Order
    {
        [Key]
        [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public DateTime Date { get; set; }
        public decimal TotalPaid { get { return Payments.Sum(x => x.Amount); } }
        public decimal Total { get { return OrderItems.Sum(x => x.TotalPrice); } }
        public bool PaidCompletely { get { return Total == TotalPaid; } }
        public List<OrderItem> OrderItems { get; set; } = new List<OrderItem>();
        public List<Payment> Payments { get; set; } = new List<Payment>();
    }

    public class OrderItem
    {
        [Key]
        [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public decimal PricePerUnit { get; set; }
        public decimal Quantity { get; set; }
        public decimal TotalPrice { get { return PricePerUnit * Quantity; } }
    }

    public class Payment
    {
        [Key]
        [DatabaseGenerated(DatabaseGeneratedOption.Identity)]
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public decimal Amount { get; set; }
        public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    }

I want to get all orders that are not fully paid.

The following is not working

var OrdersNotFullyPaidShort = 
    context
    .Orders
    .Where(order => !order.PaidCompletely)
    .ToList();

giving the error

The LINQ expression 'Where(source: DbSet, predicate: (o) => !(o.PaidCompletely))' could not be translated...

The following works, but I have to rewrite all the logic again in the query, while I have the logic also defined in the classes:

var OrdersNotFullyPaidLong =
    context
    .Orders
    .Where(order => order.OrderItems.Sum(orderItem => orderItem.PricePerUnit * orderItem.Quantity) == order.Payments.Sum(payment => payment.Amount))
    .ToList();

and generates this quite ugly query:

      SELECT [o].[Id], [o].[Date]
      FROM [Orders] AS [o]
      WHERE (((
          SELECT SUM([o0].[PricePerUnit] * [o0].[Quantity])
          FROM [OrderItems] AS [o0]
          WHERE ([o].[Id] = [o0].[OrderId]) AND [o0].[OrderId] IS NOT NULL) = (
          SELECT SUM([p].[Amount])
          FROM [Payments] AS [p]
          WHERE ([o].[Id] = [p].[OrderId]) AND [p].[OrderId] IS NOT NULL)) AND ((
          SELECT SUM([o0].[PricePerUnit] * [o0].[Quantity])
          FROM [OrderItems] AS [o0]
          WHERE ([o].[Id] = [o0].[OrderId]) AND [o0].[OrderId] IS NOT NULL) IS NOT NULL AND (
          SELECT SUM([p].[Amount])
          FROM [Payments] AS [p]
          WHERE ([o].[Id] = [p].[OrderId]) AND [p].[OrderId] IS NOT NULL) IS NOT NULL)) OR ((
          SELECT SUM([o0].[PricePerUnit] * [o0].[Quantity])
          FROM [OrderItems] AS [o0]
          WHERE ([o].[Id] = [o0].[OrderId]) AND [o0].[OrderId] IS NOT NULL) IS NULL AND (
          SELECT SUM([p].[Amount])
          FROM [Payments] AS [p]
          WHERE ([o].[Id] = [p].[OrderId]) AND [p].[OrderId] IS NOT NULL) IS NULL)

Is there no way to use my first way of querying? What am I doing wrong, are my classes not well defined?

5
  • Formulas hidden in Properties can generally not been translated in to LINQ. It's technicly impossible. Only Formulas in the where-select clause can be translated. Try to express it differently. Have an outside view to all of your data. There you can do Joins, Sums, Grouping, etc. Your construction only works with LINQ to objects, cause there it does not need to be translated to SQL.
    – Holger
    Oct 19, 2019 at 10:08
  • @Holger , do you mean I have to create Views in my SQL database?
    – intrixius
    Oct 19, 2019 at 10:14
  • No, you have to form a Query in One Place, in one line. Not .Where(order => !order.PaidCompletely) , but .Where(order => OrderItems.Sum(x => x.TotalPrice))-Payments.Sum(x => x.Amount)>0) This shall just demonstrate the approach, it's not the final solution. In this way, LINQ has the chance, at least to receive the Formulas. LINQ is done at runtime there is no Source available, only the compiled machine code. LINQ cannot translate machine code to SQL. Inside a Lambda, the code is not immediatly machine code, it's an Expession<Func<>>, that's kind of stored source code.
    – Holger
    Oct 19, 2019 at 10:28
  • No, you have to form a Query in One Place, in one line Well, that isn't strictly speaking true. It can be over multiple lines of code. But I agree with the rest of the comment @Holger.
    – mjwills
    Oct 19, 2019 at 11:54
  • @Holger that's still quite a cryptic answer :-/ . Should I somehow define a IQueryable method inside the model so I can call it when I need it?
    – intrixius
    Oct 19, 2019 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

0

I've tried this:

    var query = db.Order.Select(x => new { Id = x.Id, Date = x.Date,
                    Payments = x.Payments.Sum(y => y.Amount),
                    ToPay = x.OrderItems.Sum(y => y.PricePerUnit * y.Quantity)})
                   .Where(x => x.Payments < x.ToPay);

and it created

SELECT 
     [Project2].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Project2].[Date] AS [Date], 
[Project2].[C1] AS [C1], 
[Project2].[C2] AS [C2]
FROM ( SELECT 
    [Project1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Project1].[Date] AS [Date], 
    [Project1].[C1] AS [C1], 
    (SELECT 
        SUM([Filter2].[A1_0]) AS [A1]
        FROM ( SELECT 
            [Extent3].[PricePerUnit] * [Extent3].[Quantity] AS [A1_0]
            FROM [dbo].[OrderItems] AS [Extent3]
            WHERE [Project1].[Id] = [Extent3].[Order_Id]
        )  AS [Filter2]) AS [C2]
    FROM ( SELECT 
        [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
        [Extent1].[Date] AS [Date], 
        (SELECT 
            SUM([Extent2].[Amount]) AS [A1]
            FROM [dbo].[Payments] AS [Extent2]
            WHERE [Extent1].[Id] = [Extent2].[Order_Id]) AS [C1]
        FROM [dbo].[Orders] AS [Extent1]
    )  AS [Project1]
)  AS [Project2]
WHERE ([Project2].[C1] < [Project2].[C2]) AND ([Project2].[C1] < [Project2].[C2])

Which looks quiet nice to me It might depend on the LINQ-Provider, what Query is created.

Before caring about an "ugly" query, you should be glad a valid query can be created. The only reason to further optimization of LINQ expressions is performance. You cannot optimize for readability or beauty.

5
  • That indeed looks quite fine. I wonder if I should use computed columns (docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/relational/…) instead, so I don't have to write these sums each time in the queries? Or is there a better way to compute them on the fly without resulting in N+1 or N*N queries ?
    – intrixius
    Oct 20, 2019 at 7:14
  • I don't know what you mean with N+1 or N*N queries, this is 1 query, in words "One". To have one query is to ensure minimal communication from client to server, send one query, get one result-set. Don't be confused by several selects, that's just language construct. SQL-Servers are good in optimization. Computed columns have minimal advantage, the difference from sending a formula in a query, or store a formula in advance in the table design is small. You should always keep an eye on computation on SQL-Server vs. computation on your C# client. That's crucial.
    – Holger
    Oct 20, 2019 at 9:39
  • In my real-life application, I am trying get Orders that are not fully paid, but I somehow end up with (N*2)+1 queries: it first fetches all orders in one query, then fetches each order with its orderitems and then again it fetches each order with its payments... that behaviour might be unrelated with this question, but I don't see any other reason...
    – intrixius
    Oct 20, 2019 at 12:34
  • I cannot do more than giving you the code that ends up in 1 query. Do not use any computations inside properties !, all your "Total" and "TotalPaid" and "PAidCompletly" and so on, don't use it. (And I haven't in my linq query, as you see). Such things may result in multiple queries to the database, cause they cannot be processed by the SQL-Server, they have will be performed on the client. Always. Unconditionally. You have One ugly query, I gave you one alternative query; and you keep telling stories of having more than one query.I'm rather in doubt you know what a query is.
    – Holger
    Oct 20, 2019 at 12:45
  • I will take your suggestion as granted and will remove all the computed properties to see if that changes anything. I do know what queries are, but I am struggling to understand how this LINQ magic works and how to create LINQ statements that will generate a single query with one trip to the database, instead of these N+1 roundtrips. I know that multiple selects in one query are not wrong per sé...
    – intrixius
    Oct 20, 2019 at 12:52
0

I think this blogpost gives a good explanation on what happens and what possible solutions exist:

https://daveaglick.com/posts/computed-properties-and-entity-framework

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