21

I'm assuming that the good old qsort function in stdlib is not stable, because the man page doesn't say anything about it. This is the function I'm talking about:

   #include <stdlib.h>
   void qsort(void *base, size_t nmemb, size_t size,
              int(*compar)(const void *, const void *));  

I assume that if I change my comparison function to also include the address of that which I'm comparing, it will be stable. Is that correct?

Eg:

int compareFoos( const void* pA, const void *pB ) {
    Foo *pFooA = (Foo*) pA;
    Foo *pFooB = (Foo*) pB;

    if( pFooA->id < pFooB->id ) {
        return -1;
    } else if( pFooA->id > pFooB->id ) {
        return 1;
    } else if( pA < pB ) {
        return -1;            
    } else if( pB > pA ) {
       return 1;
    } else {
       return 0;
    }
}   
6
  • 1
    I don't understand why you would compare the pointers. And what do you mean by stable (excuse my ignorance). Maybe you could elaborate in your question.
    – jmatthias
    Feb 25, 2009 at 4:13
  • 4
    By stable he means that is items a compares equal to item b, and a initially comes before b in the array, it will still come before b in the sorted array. Term of Art in sorting circles, and the reason for the hack of comparing the addresses. Very neat. Feb 25, 2009 at 4:15
  • 3
    Very neat idea, @dmckee, but unfortunately not stable since twk is using current addresses rather than starting addresses :-)
    – paxdiablo
    Feb 25, 2009 at 4:19
  • @paxdiablo: Not only is it not stable; it also invokes undefined behavior by violating the constraints of the comparison function. In particular, it could cause some implementations of qsort to go into an infinite loop or even perform out-of-bound writes when permuting the array. Apr 24, 2012 at 2:23
  • Honestly, just use an external, stable sort function :) Apr 24, 2012 at 2:37

3 Answers 3

32

No, you cannot rely on that unfortunately. Let's assume you have the array (two fields in each record used for checking but only first field used for sorting):

BBBB,1
BBBB,2
AAAA,3

Quicksort may compare BBBB,1 with AAAA,3 and swap them, giving:

AAAA,3
BBBB,2
BBBB,1

If the next step were to compare BBBB,2 with BBBB,1, the keys would be the same and, since BBBB,2 has an address less than BBBB,1, no swap will take place. For a stable sort, you should have ended up with:

AAAA,3
BBBB,1
BBBB,2

The only way to do it would be to attach the starting address of the pointer (not its current address) and sort using that as well as the other keys. That way, the original address becomes the minor part of the sort key so that BBBB,1 will eventually end up before BBBB,2 regardless of where the two BBBB lines go during the sorting process.

6
  • 3
    Ah, good call. I knew my spider sense was tingling for a reason.
    – twk
    Feb 25, 2009 at 4:21
  • and even if you would compare using the original addresses, it's not guaranteed to work: nothing says that qsort has to do that second compare of the two equal values anymore. for an unstable algorithm, the sequence in the second snapshot is already sorted completely. Feb 25, 2009 at 4:49
  • 1
    @litb -- I'm not sure what you mean. With the compare function I posted, there are no "equal" values.
    – twk
    Feb 25, 2009 at 4:52
  • Don't think I agree with that, @litb. If you added starting address to the compare function (equivalent to adding the 1/2/3 above), snapshot 2 wouldn't be sorted.
    – paxdiablo
    Feb 25, 2009 at 4:55
  • 1
    'Sokay, @litb, advantage of working on the other side of the planet from everyone else is that I'm in full flight when everyone else is getting tired :-)
    – paxdiablo
    Feb 25, 2009 at 5:14
11

The canonical solution is to make (i.e. allocate memory for and fill) an array of pointers to the elements of the original array, and qsort this new array, using an extra level of indirection and falling back to comparing pointer values when the things they point to are equal. This approach has the potential side benefit that you don't modify the original array at all - but if you want the original array to be sorted in the end, you'll have to permute it to match the order in the array of pointers after qsort returns.

0

This does not work because during the sort procedure, the ordering will change and two elements will not have consistent output. What I do to make good old-fashioned qsort stable is to add the initial index inside my struct and initialize that value before passing it to qsort.

typedef struct __bundle {
    data_t some_data;
    int sort_score;
    size_t init_idx;
} bundle_t;

/*
 .
 .
 .
 .
*/

int bundle_cmp(void *ptr1, void *ptr2) {
    bundle_t *b1, *b2;
    b1 = (budnel_t *) ptr1;
    b2 = (budnel_t *) ptr2;
    if (b1->sort_score < b2->sort_score) {
        return -1;
    }
    if (b1->sort_score > b2->sort_score) {
        return 1;
    }
    if (b1->init_idx < b2->init_idx) {
        return -1;
    }
    if (b1->init_idx > b2->init_idx) {
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}

void sort_bundle_arr(bundle_t *b, size_t sz) {
    size_t i;
    for (i = 0; i < sz; i++) {
        b[i]->init_idx = i;
    }
    qsort(b, sz, sizeof(bundle_t), bundle_cmp);
}

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