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As suggested by @John, here is re-write:

Consider this code:

public object Foo(object original)
{
    List<object> origList = original as List<object>;    //problematic line, origList is null even though it was initialized as [1,2,3] in main method
    List<object> copy = new List<object>();

    foreach (var item in origList)
        copy.Add(item);

    return copy;
}

class Example
{
    List<int> someList = new List<int>() { 1,2,3 };
    // and also other Lists, I dont know their type at compile time
    // and other fields and methods
}

//in usage method:

Example e1 = new Example();
object obj1 = e1;    // this is original
Example e2 = new Example();
object obj2 = e2;   // this is copy

FieldInfo[] fields_of_class = obj1.GetType().GetFields(
            BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);

foreach(FieldInfo fi in fields_of_class)
{
    object currentObject = fi.GetValue(obj1);

    // do type checking
    if (IsList(currentObject)
    {
        fi.SetValue(obj2, Foo(currentObject));    // here I have to retrive copy of the list, but I dont know generic argument beforehand as it can be List<insert any type here>
    }
}

How can I get that original list from System.Object in Foo method?

Preferably, I would like not to use generic methods as I would have to MakeGenericMethod which is slow for me. But if that's only solution I take it.

Now I know this isn't the smallest code example. Right now, I am looking into some other solutions of the problem.

  • 2
    A List<int> is not a List<object> otherwise you'd be able to add non int instances to it. Why not List<int> origList = original as List<int>? – vc 74 Oct 20 at 10:01
  • Definitely read Eric's explanation. – John Oct 20 at 10:04
  • I've added another link to the list: How do I clone a generic list in C#? - the simplest option is to use the LINQ extension method .ToList() (e.g. var newList = someList.ToList();), which will produce a new list. – John Oct 20 at 10:05
  • @sanitizedUser Can you edit your question to clarify what you want? Olivier's answer answers the question "how do I convert any list to List<Object>?" whereas your question seeks to create a List<int> when a List<int> is provided. You've accepted the answer but it doesn't seem to match your question. – John Oct 20 at 10:26
  • @John I probably should have told that: It's Reflection. I don't know what type field would be when copying, If it's list I use this method. I have to get back an object to assign it to the field with FieldInfo.SetValue() again. – sanitizedUser Oct 20 at 10:27
1

You can try this:

public object Foo(object original)
{
  if ( original is System.Collections.IEnumerable )
  {
    List<object> copy = new List<object>();

    foreach ( var item in original as System.Collections.IEnumerable )
      copy.Add(item);

    return copy;
  }
  else
    return null;
}
  • Fun Easter egg: Foo("hello") :) – John Oct 20 at 10:09
  • @John Of course, there is type checking that original is of type List<>, this is just minimal example. – sanitizedUser Oct 20 at 10:18
  • @Olivier Rogier that worked however it caused next problem: 'System.Collections.Generic.List``1[System.Object]' cannot be converted to type 'System.Collections.Generic.List``1[System.Int32]'.' So I guess Making generic method for creating correct list is needed anyway. – sanitizedUser Oct 20 at 10:25
  • @sanitizedUser This answer builds a List<object> which doesn't seem to be what you want. – John Oct 20 at 10:26

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