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My question comes from the following paragraph:

Binary Search is better than Jump Search, but Jump search has an advantage that we traverse back only once (Binary Search may require up to O(Log n) jumps, consider a situation where the element to be searched is the smallest element or smaller than the smallest). So in a system where binary search is costly, we use Jump Search.

Here is what jump search about: http://geeksforgeeks.org/jump-search/

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In binary search, why traverse back cost more than traverse forward?

This is not a general truth, and it is not what the quote from GeeksforGeeks wants to express. What they want to say is that if it is known that(!) traversing backward is for some reason more expensive than traversing forward (independent on which search method you are using), then Jump Search may become an interesting choice. If not, there is hardly a reason to consider that alternative.

The quoted explanation could maybe be improved as follows:

Binary Search is better has a better time complexity than Jump Search, but Jump Search has an advantage that we traverse back only once (Binary Search may require up to O(Log n) backward jumps; consider a situation where the element to be searched is the smallest element or smaller than the smallest). So in a system where binary search is costly a backward traversal is more costly than a forward traversal, we might want to use Jump Search.

For examples where traversing backward could be more expensive, think of data that is stored on tapes: when traversing in forward direction, the tape can just keep winding on-and-on while providing data, but with a backward traversal, the tape needs to stop winding forward (this costs time), perform a rewind, and then reverse its direction again (again, this costs extra time). Or take disk drives, where the disk has to go through one complete revolution to arrive at the spot for reading a previous block.

  • Can I think like this? In array, traverse forward has the same cost as traverse back because accessing array element is immediate. In linked list, traverse back cost more because it has to go to the first node and traverse forward. – 李清照 Oct 27 at 9:24
  • Yes, that is true. But if you have a linked list, you would just compare each element going forward and stop when you found it. There is not much use in using Jump Search with a linked list (unless comparing two values is very costly). – trincot Oct 27 at 9:24
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    Gotcha, Thank you😇 – 李清照 Oct 27 at 11:02

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