1

Function foo1 can subset (using subset()) a list of data.frames by one or more requested variables (e.g., by = ESL == 1 or by == ESL == 1 & type == 4).

However, I'm aware of the danger of using subset() in R. Thus, I wonder in foo1 below, what I can use instead of subset() to get the same output?

foo1 <- function(data, by){

  s <- substitute(by)
  L <- split(data, data$study.name) ; L[[1]] <- NULL

  lapply(L, function(x) do.call("subset", list(x, s))) ## What to use instead of `subset`
                                                       ## to get the same output?
}

# EXAMPLE OF USE:
D <- read.csv("https://raw.githubusercontent.com/izeh/i/master/k.csv", header=TRUE) # DATA
foo1(D, ESL == 1) 
1

You can compute on the language. Building on my answer to "Working with substitute after $ sign in R":

foo1 <- function(data, by){

  s <- substitute(by)
  L <- split(data, data$study.name) ; L[[1]] <- NULL

  E <- quote(x$a)
  E[[3]] <- s[[2]]
  s[[2]] <- E

  eval(bquote(lapply(L, function(x) x[.(s),])))
}

foo1(D, ESL == 1) 

This gets more complex for arbitrary subset expressions. You'd need a recursive function that crawls the parse tree and inserts the calls to $ at the right places.

Personally, I'd just use package data.table where this is easier because you don't need $, i.e., you can just do eval(bquote(lapply(L, function(x) setDT(x)[.(s),]))) without changing s. OTOH, I wouldn't do this at all. There is really no reason to split before subsetting.

1

I would guess (based on general knowledge and a quick skim of the answers to the "dangers of subset()" question) that the dangers of subset are intrinsic dangers of non-standard evaluation (NSE); if you want to be able to pass a generic expression and have it evaluated within the context of a data frame, I think you're more or less stuck with subset() or something like it.

If you were willing to use a more constrained set of expressions such as var, vals (looking for cases where the variable indexed by string var took on values in the vector vals) you could use

d[d[[var]] %in% vals, ]

Here var is a string, not a naked R symbol ("cyl" rather than cyl); it's unambiguous that you want to extract it from the data frame.

You could extend this to a vector of variables and a list of vectors of values:

for (i in seq_along(vars)) {
   d <- d[d[[vars[i]]] %in% vals[[i]], ]
}

but if you want the full flexibility of expressions (e.g. to be able to use either ESL == 1 & type == 4 or ESL == 1 | type == 4, or inequalities based on numeric variables) I think you're stuck with an NSE-based approach.

It's conceivable that the new-ish "tidy eval" machinery (in the rlang package, documented in some detail here) would give you a slightly more principled approach, but I don't think the dangers will completely go away.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.