0
#include <iostream>

void test(){}
void test1();

int main()
{
   test();
   test1();
   return 0; 
}

void test1(){}

The code above tell us ,when calling some function ,the definition or declaration of the function must be looked up before the point of call. In the second part

#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
void show(T){}

int main()
{
  show(0); //#1
  return 0;
}
//#2
//#3

we know at #1, the template function show needs a implicit instantiation, and the point of instantiation is after main function, at "#2" or the end of translation unit "#3". I'm confused ... if the definition of "show < int>" is after the point #1, then why the compiler can look up the definition for #1 and then linked it?

  • @Mat Beacuse the definition of show<int> is at #2 or #3 and no declartion of show<int> before #1,How the complier can link for it? – jack X Oct 21 '19 at 5:24
  • @Mat there's no ovrload resolution here,just symbol look up and linked,the symbol is show<int> and the show<int> is defined after the point of call ,I want to know how the complier linked for show<int> when is's definition is follow to it,test1 can be linked because although the definiton is follow it but it's declartion is before to it – jack X Oct 21 '19 at 5:57
  • @Mat your idea is the "template<typename T> void show(T)" which is equal to the declartion and it can help complier linked the definiton of show<int>(int) at #2 or #3 and much the same situation as with test1? – jack X Oct 21 '19 at 6:06
  • @Mat My understand about overload resolution is the complier find out the exactest much function to call in candidate list. link the symbol is the last things to do,So here the exactest much is template<typename T> void show(T),then complier generated the definition for show(0) at #2 or #3,but at now,no declartion show<int> before show(0),I'm confused at here,The example is a little different from test1 – jack X Oct 21 '19 at 8:28
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Maybe the terms definition and declarationare making things more complicated to understand. But the main idea is to let the compiler know that a function called test(), test1() and/or show() exists. These functions maybe defined after #1 in #2 or #3, although for templates the declaration is usually followed by the definition.

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  • 1
    the questions are why the function defined after #1 in #2 or #3 which can make complier linked for function show<int>?For calling function,the defination or declartion must be looked up before it,why at the point of instantiation which at #2 or #3 can be looked up for #1? – jack X Oct 21 '19 at 4:54
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The C++ standard describes overload resolution starting with this paragraph [temp.over]:

When a call to the name of a function or function template is written (explicitly, or implicitly using the operator notation), template argument deduction ([temp.deduct]) and checking of any explicit template arguments ([temp.arg]) are performed for each function template to find the template argument values (if any) that can be used with that function template to instantiate a function template specialization that can be invoked with the call arguments.

In your case, only the show function template is found. Continuing:

For each function template, if the argument deduction and checking succeeds, the template-arguments (deduced and/or explicit) are used to synthesize the declaration of a single function template specialization which is added to the candidate functions set to be used in overload resolution. [...] The complete set of candidate functions includes all the synthesized declarations and all of the non-template overloaded functions of the same name. The synthesized declarations are treated like any other functions in the remainder of overload resolution, except as explicitly noted in [over.match.best].

Emphasis added. Skipped the part about failed argument deduction.

When argument deduction finishes, and succeeds in this case, the compiler has in hand a perfectly good (synthesized) declaration. It can use that to generate the call. It can call the synthesized show<int>(int) function just like it can call test1() in your first example.

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  • In other words,the complier can generate the declartion for show<int>(int) implicitly,just like the "void test1();" before the point of call for test1()? – jack X Oct 22 '19 at 1:43
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... if the definition of show<int> is after the point #1 ...

This sounds like a misunderstanding. A point of instantiation is not a point where a declaration or definition of a specialization exists, is "inserted" into code, or anything like that. Its only purpose is to specify what names used within a template mean for a given specialization of that template, and whether the use of those names is valid.

The actual name lookup rule here is that within main, the name show will be looked up as an unqualified name, which must find at least one previously declared entity, like a variable, a type, a function, or a function template. The lookup finds the template, so name lookup is successful.

A template specialization's declaration and definition are actually separately instantiated. (A function template's default arguments and noexcept specifier are additionally separately instantiated if needed.) Though in this example, the one expression show(0) implicitly instantiates both the declaration and definition of show<int>. Overload resolution and checking that the function type is viable require the declaration. Since the expression is an odr-use of the function, the definition is required, which means the definition is implicitly instantiated.

These implicit instantiations don't have one single place in the source file. They just are. The point of definition and points of instantiation are just important for knowing the meaning of any names used in the template. Except that doesn't come up here, since the only name used (rather than declared) is the T used as a function parameter type in show(T). And that T is declared within the same template, in the template parameter list, so we don't need to get into which scopes and declarations outside of the template might apply.

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  • what does "the one expression show(0) implicitly instantiates both the declaration and definition of show<int>" mean? The complier will generate the declaration for show<int>(int) implicitly ,not just definition? – jack X Oct 22 '19 at 2:03
  • yeah,about the point of instantiation ,the complier actually does not insert the code to the source file,just for understanding easily,we imagine the definition is at the point of instantiation?Do you agree my understand about this? – jack X Oct 22 '19 at 2:10
  • No, I don't think it's helpful to imagine that. A "non-dependent name" in the template which names a declaration that would be visible at the point of instantiation is not used by the specialization: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/59f05f2dadfb2027 – aschepler Oct 22 '19 at 3:54
  • Because the value 0 is the int type ,firstly ,basicly type does not participte ADL,and then since a(0) does not depend template paramenters,So in the template context, only the "void a(double)" be looked up and no adl here?if you write a(T{}) in the template context and use it by f(user_defined_type{});ADL will effective at the point of instantiation :coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/aefe64cdb6fddeff – jack X Oct 22 '19 at 5:04
  • Which goes to show that it's neither entirely "as though inserted at the point of definition" nor "as though inserted at the point of instantiation". It's just that the definition does exist, and there are various rules for how different names in the template are looked up for each specialization. But that example violates [temp.res]/7 "If two different points of instantiation give a template specialization different meanings according to the one-definition rule, the program is ill-formed, no diagnostic required." – aschepler Oct 22 '19 at 12:01

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