1

When inserting data into a many-to-many relationship, should you insert to the join-table or to both original tables?

My table models:

public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
public DbSet<Group> Groups { get; set; }
public DbSet<GroupMember> GroupMembers { get; set; }

The relationship between them is configured with Fluent API:

builder.Entity<GroupMembers>().HasKey(gm => new { gm.UserId, gm.GroupId });
builder.Entity<GroupMembers>().HasOne(gm => gm.Group).WithMany(group => group.GroupMembers).HasForeignKey(gm => gm.GroupId);
builder.Entity<GroupMembers>().HasOne(gm => gm.User).WithMany(user => user.GroupMembers).HasForeignKey(gm => gm.UserId);
public class Group
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public List<GroupMember> GroupMembers { get; set; } = new List<GroupMembers>();
}

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }

    public List<GroupMembers> GroupMembers { get; set; } = new List<GroupMembers>();
}

public class GroupMembers
{
    [Key]
    public Guid UserId { get; set; }
    public User User { get; set; }

    [Key]
    public Guid GroupId { get; set; }
    public Group Group { get; set; }
}

Now, the question is; in which tables/classes should I insert the data about the group members? Is it like this:

GroupMembers groupMember = new GroupMembers
{
    Group = group,
    GroupId = group.Id,
    User = user,
    UserId = user.Id
};


user.GroupMembers.Add(groupMember);
group.GroupMembers.Add(groupMember)

_databaseContext.Users.Update(user);
_databaseContext.SaveChanges();;

_databaseContext.Groups.Update(group);
_databaseContext.SaveChanges();

Or like this, leaving the User and Group untouched, with the information about their relationship ONLY in the join-table:

GroupMembers groupMember = new GroupMembers
{
    Group = group,
    GroupId = group.Id,
    User = user,
    UserId = user.Id
};


_databaseContext.GroupMembers.Add(groupMember);
_databaseContext.SaveChanges();
1

As far as Entity Framework is concerned, this is not a many-to-many relationship

What you have here is three entity types with two one-to-many relationships defined between them. You might know that this is done to represent a many-to-many, but EF doesn't know that.

If I arbitrarily change the names of your entities while maintaining the structure, you wouldn't be able to tell if this was a many-to-many relationship or not.

Simple example:

public class Country {}

public class Company {}

public class Person
{
    public int CountryOfBirthId { get; set; }
    public virtual Country CountryOfBirth { get; set; }

    public int EmployerId { get; set; }
    public virtual Company Employer { get; set; }
}

You wouldn't initially think of Person as the represenation of a many-to-many relationship between Country and Company, would you? And yet, this is structurally the same as your example.

Essentially, your handling of your code shouldn't be any different from how you handle any of your one-to-many relationships. GroupMembers is a table (db set) like any else, and EF will expect you to treat it like a normal entity table.

The only thing that's different here is that because GroupMember has two one-to-many relationships in which it is the "many", you therefore have to supply two FKs (one to each related entity). But the handling is exactly the same as if you had only one one-to-many relationship here.

In other words, add your groupMember to the table itself:

GroupMembers groupMember = new GroupMembers
{
    // You don't have to fill in the nav props if you don't need them
    GroupId = group.Id,
    UserId = user.Id
};

_databaseContext.GroupMembers.Add(groupMember);
_databaseContext.SaveChanges();

Note: The following only applies to non-Core Entity Framework, as EF Core does not yet support it.

An example of what would be a "real" many-to-many relationship in (non-Core) EF would be if the intermediary table was not managed by you, i.e.:

public class MyContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<User> Users { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Group> Groups { get; set; }
}

public class Group
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
}

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Username { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Group> Groups { get; set; }
}

In this scenario, EF will still generate the cross table in the database, but EF will hide this table from you. Here, you are expected to work via the nav props:

var user = myContext.Users.First();
var group = myContext.Groups.First();

user.Groups.Add(group);

myContext.SaveChanges();

Whether you use a "real" many-to-many relationship or manage the cross table yourself is up to you. I tend to only manage the cross table myself when I can't avoid it, e.g. when I want additional data on the cross table.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you, great answer. But, Microsoft says that Entity Framework CORE does not yet support many-to-many relationship without a join table. docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/… Also, does this mean that the list in User and Group stay empty forever? – Ramriez Oct 21 '19 at 12:20
  • @Ramriez Oops, I missed that this is EF Core. Yeah that invalidates the second part of the answer (will amend) but the first half remains correct. The list in user and group will not be empty if you fetch it from the database and include its related entities, after you created (and committed) the cross table entries. But EF is not going to magically fill in the nav props of entity objects that had been fetched prior to creating the cross table entries, no. – Flater Oct 21 '19 at 12:30
  • Okay, I understand that we can fill up the List<GroupMembers> by manually adding GroupMembers when they have been created. But why would I want this? Doens´t this mean that the data is saved multiple places? Isn´t it easier to get User and Group based on their IDs from GroupMembers? – Ramriez Oct 21 '19 at 12:40
  • @Ramriez: I'm not sure what your issue/question is. For any relationship between A and B, EF will allow you to fetch B as a related entity of A, or A as a related entity of B. Whichever floats your boat. This does not mean the data is "saved in multiple places", you can check the database tables yourself to confirm this. Also, EF does not instantiate the same entity more than once when executing a single query. Fetching many GroupMember entities which all have the same parent user will make EF create this user object once and then refer to that same object in every GroupMember entity. – Flater Oct 21 '19 at 12:45
0

Make sure the data id is correct and Exists

GroupMembers groupMember = new GroupMembers
{
    GroupId = group.Id,
    UserId = user.Id
};

_databaseContext.GroupMembers.Add(groupMember);
_databaseContext.SaveChanges();

There is less line of code and you have to assume that the object is completely independent when inserted

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, does this mean that the list in User and Group always stays empty? – Ramriez Oct 21 '19 at 12:12
  • 1
    Only IDs are sufficient when adding.When fetching data List Or Get By Id, request one or both depending on your request User and Group – Reza Yousefi Oct 21 '19 at 12:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.