3

Please consider the following experimental Ada program which attempts to create a 32-bit record with well defined bit fields, create one and output it to a file stream...

with System;
with Ada.Text_IO; use Ada.Text_IO;
with Ada.Streams.Stream_Io; use Ada.Streams.Stream_Io;

procedure Main is

   type Bit is mod    (2 ** 1);

   type Opcode_Number is mod (2 ** 4);
   type Condition_Number is mod (2 ** 4);
   type Operand is mod (2 ** 9);

   type RAM_Register is
      record
         Opcode : Opcode_Number;
         Z      : Bit;
         C      : Bit;
         R      : Bit;
         I      : Bit;
         Cond   : Condition_Number;
         Rsvd_1 : Bit;
         Rsvd_2 : Bit;
         Dest   : Operand;
         Src    : Operand;
      end record;

   for RAM_Register use
      record
         Opcode at 0 range 28 .. 31;
         Z      at 0 range 27 .. 27;
         C      at 0 range 26 .. 26;
         R      at 0 range 25 .. 25;
         I      at 0 range 24 .. 24;
         Cond   at 0 range 20 .. 23;
         Rsvd_1 at 0 range 19 .. 19;
         Rsvd_2 at 0 range 18 .. 18;
         Dest   at 0 range  9 .. 17;
         Src    at 0 range  0 ..  8;
      end record;
   for RAM_Register'Size use 32;
   for RAM_Register'Bit_Order use System.High_Order_First;

   --  ADA 2012 language reference 'full_type_declaration'
   --  (page 758, margin number 8/3) for RAM_Register
   pragma Atomic (RAM_Register);


   --   3         2         1         0
   --  10987654321098765432109876543210
   --  OOOOzcriCONDrrDDDDDDDDDsssssssss

   X : RAM_Register := (2#1000#,
                           2#1#,
                           2#1#,
                           2#1#,
                           2#1#,
                        2#1000#,
                           2#1#,
                           2#1#,
                   2#100000001#,
                   2#100000001#);

   The_File : Ada.Streams.Stream_IO.File_Type;
   The_Stream : Ada.Streams.Stream_IO.Stream_Access;

begin
   begin
      Open (The_File, Out_File, "test.dat");
   exception
      when others =>
         Create (The_File, Out_File, "test.dat");
   end;

   The_Stream := Stream (The_File);
   RAM_Register'Write (The_Stream, X);
   Close (The_File);
end Main;

I used the info here: https://rosettacode.org/wiki/Object_serialization#Ada and here: https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ada_Programming/Attributes/%27Bit_Order (the very last example) to create the above.

Running the code and examining the output with xxd -g1 test.dat gives the following 12 bytes of output...

00000000: 08 01 01 01 01 08 01 01 01 01 01 01              ............

QUESTION:

How can this 32 bit record be written to, or read from, a stream as 32 bits, observing all bitfield positions? Imagine I was communicating with a microcontroller on an RS-232 port, each bit will be required to be exactly in the right place at the right time. The syntax for RAM_Register use record... seems to have had no effect on how 'Write arranges its output.

If I do provide my own 'Read and 'Write implementations, doesn't that directly contradict the 'for RAM_Register use record...` code?

  • 1
    You could legally make your own stream attributes that converted to/from XML on the wire. The rep clause defines layout in register/store, & if you want to send that on the wire that’s what you should do (with unchecked conversion at the lower levels). Ada streams are a much higher-level construct. – Simon Wright Oct 21 at 20:34
6

You probably will have to convert the instance to an unsigned integer (via an unchecked conversion) and then write the unsigned integer to the stream. The default implementation of Write ignores the representation clause (see also RM 13 9/3):

For composite types, the Write or Read attribute for each component is called in canonical order, [...]

So, add

with Interfaces; use Interfaces;
with Ada.Unchecked_Conversion;

and define RAM_Register as

   type RAM_Register is
      record
         Opcode : Opcode_Number;
         Z      : Bit;
         C      : Bit;
         R      : Bit;
         I      : Bit;
         Cond   : Condition_Number;
         Rsvd_1 : Bit;
         Rsvd_2 : Bit;
         Dest   : Operand;
         Src    : Operand;
      end record with Atomic;  

   procedure Write
     (Stream : not null access Ada.Streams.Root_Stream_Type'Class;
      Item   : RAM_Register);

   for RAM_Register'Write use Write;

   for RAM_Register use
      record         
         Opcode at 0 range 28 .. 31;
         Z      at 0 range 27 .. 27;
         C      at 0 range 26 .. 26;
         R      at 0 range 25 .. 25;
         I      at 0 range 24 .. 24;
         Cond   at 0 range 20 .. 23;
         Rsvd_1 at 0 range 19 .. 19;
         Rsvd_2 at 0 range 18 .. 18;
         Dest   at 0 range  9 .. 17;
         Src    at 0 range  0 ..  8;
      end record;   

   for RAM_Register'Size use 32;
   for RAM_Register'Bit_Order use System.High_Order_First; 

   -----------
   -- Write --
   -----------

   procedure Write
     (Stream : not null access Ada.Streams.Root_Stream_Type'Class;
      Item   : RAM_Register)
   is

      function To_Unsigned_32 is
        new Ada.Unchecked_Conversion (RAM_Register, Unsigned_32); 

      U32 : Unsigned_32 := To_Unsigned_32 (Item);

   begin   
      Unsigned_32'Write (Stream, U32);        
   end Write;

This yields

$ xxd -g1 test.dat
00000000: 01 03 8e 8f                                      ....

Note: the bitorder may have been reversed as I had to comment the aspect specification for RAM_Register'Bit_Order use System.High_Order_First;

  • 1
    Your xxd output matches my pen-and-paper workings except for the byte swapping! I can compensate for that. I hadn't expected to have to resort to "unchecked" shenanigans for something like this. The official documentation is very hard to follow and understand in this regard. Thanks. – Wossname Oct 21 at 20:41
  • I already had problem with endianess and you should find hints in this question stackoverflow.com/questions/56656184/… However, you will see that I use a Gnat only attribute for this. – Frédéric Praca Oct 22 at 12:18

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