1

I'm writing a program that needs to read a map file and save the data as a 2D int array. The data is in the form:

6,2,4,5,3,9,1,7,7,
5,1,9,7,2,8,6,3,4,
8,3,7,6,1,4,2,9,5,
1,4,3,8,6,5,7,2,9,
9,5,8,2,4,7,3,6,1,
7,6,2,3,9,1,4,5,8,
3,7,1,9,5,6,8,4,2,
4,9,6,1,8,2,5,7,3,
2,8,5,4,7,3,9,1,6

I was able to read all of the data and store it correctly in my main method, but I wanted to clean up my code a little bit, so I tried to write a function which opens the file, reads the data, creates a static array, and then returns a pointer to it. The problem is when I try to print the returned array it prints the first index of each row in the first row and then a bunch of zeros in every other row. I've tried a few different ways of dereferencing individual indices, and it seems like my array changes once I reference it outside of my readMap() function, but I have no idea why this is happening. Here is my code so far:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#define BUFFER_SIZE 20
typedef int MAP_ARRAY[9][9];

MAP_ARRAY * readMap(const char *fileName);

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {

    MAP_ARRAY *map;
    map = readMap(argv[1]);
    for(int i = 0; i<9; i++){
      for(int j = 0; j<9; j++){
        printf("%d ", *map[i][j]);
      }
      printf("\n");
    }
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);

}

MAP_ARRAY* readMap(const char *fileName){
    FILE *mapFile;
    char *line = NULL;
    size_t buffSize = BUFFER_SIZE;
    size_t numChars;
    static MAP_ARRAY returnMap;
    mapFile = fopen(fileName,"r");

    if(mapFile == NULL){
      printf("Failed to open file.");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    // Allocate space for line buffer
    line = (char *)malloc(buffSize * sizeof(char));
    int currLine = 0;
    while((numChars = getline(&line, &buffSize, mapFile)) != -1 && currLine < 9){
      char* token = strtok(line, ",");
      int input;
      int currIndex = 0;
      while(token != NULL && currIndex < 9){
        input = atoi(token);
        returnMap[currLine][currIndex] = input;
        token = strtok(NULL, ",");
        currIndex++;
      }
      currLine++;
    }
    for(int i = 0; i<9; i++){
      for(int j = 0; j<9; j++){
        printf("%d ", returnMap[i][j]);
      }
      printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");
    fclose(mapFile);
    return &returnMap;
}

The output I get for this is

6 2 4 5 3 9 1 7 7
5 1 9 7 2 8 6 3 4
8 3 7 6 1 4 2 9 5
1 4 3 8 6 5 7 2 9
9 5 8 2 4 7 3 6 1
7 6 2 3 9 1 4 5 8
3 7 1 9 5 6 8 4 2
4 9 6 1 8 2 5 7 3
2 8 5 4 7 3 9 1 6

6 5 8 1 9 7 3 4 2
0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
7
  • 1
    A better way to do this is to declare the array in main, e.g. int map[9][9]; and then pass the array to the function, e.g.readMap(argv[1], map). In that case, all the function needs to do is fill in the values. – user3386109 Oct 21 '19 at 20:54
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    Wait, I thought declaring a variable as static means it isn't destroyed until the end of the program. Why does that not apply here? I tried your suggestions and it works the way you said it would, but now I feel like I don't understand the static keyword as well as I should – rogue_wombat Oct 21 '19 at 20:59
  • @user3386109 Ok, so why can't I get my first method to work? Am I incorrectly referencing the pointer I get back from the function? – rogue_wombat Oct 21 '19 at 21:02
  • 2
    The problem is that MAP_ARRAY *map behaves like a pointer to a three dimensional array. Declaring a pointer that acts like a two dimensional array looks like int (*map)[9]. – user3386109 Oct 21 '19 at 21:05
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    @DavidC.Rankin That is incorrect. Please do not post answers in the comments section, bypassing the peer review system - we cannot downvote them. – Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 21 '19 at 21:12
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The problem is here:

    printf("%d ", *map[i][j]);

It interprets the multiple dereferences incorrectly. When i = 1, it calculates map[i] (which is not what you want) by skipping the whole data structure. You need the following:

    printf("%d ", (*map)[i][j]);

To elaborate on what the incorrect code does: let's take an example i = 0, j = 3. I use the idea that *pointer is the same as pointer[0]. Then:

  • map[i] = map[0] = *map = the thing that map points to. This is the whole 2-D array.
  • map[i][j] = map[0][3] = the element with index 3 in *map = the row of your array with index 3
  • *map[i][j] = *map[0][3] = map[0][3][0] = the first element in row with index 3

Another example: i = 4, j = 8. Then:

  • map[i] = map[4] = element with index 4 in an infinite 3-D array whose elements are 2-D arrays int[9][9]. This is out of bounds, so it prints a random memory location.
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