52

Quite simply, I have node script that I want to execute once a month.

30 6 1 * * node /home/steve/example/script.js

But this doesn't work, presumably because of path or the shell the command is being ran under. I've tried the following means of executing node via cron (tested with -v):

steve@atom:~$ node -v
v0.4.2

steve@atom:~$ sh node -v
sh: Can't open node

steve@atom:~$ bash node -v
/usr/local/bin/node: /usr/local/bin/node: cannot execute binary file

steve@atom:~$ /usr/local/bin/node -v
v0.4.2

steve@atom:~$ sh /usr/local/bin/node -v
/usr/local/bin/node: 1: Syntax error: "(" unexpected

steve@atom:~$ bash /usr/local/bin/node -v
/usr/local/bin/node: /usr/local/bin/node: cannot execute binary file

I've ran out of ideas to try, any advice?

94

just provide the full path to node /usr/local/bin/node in your cron job like:

30 6 1 * * /usr/local/bin/node /home/steve/example/script.js
  • 2
    It turned out to be a couple of problems, the full path as you said fixed the cron, but relative paths in the script were also a issue. – Steve May 1 '11 at 16:58
  • @Steve how did you fix the relative path issues? – codecowboy Feb 1 '14 at 9:48
  • @Steve I'm using the config module (e.g. require('config').DB) and when running via crontab, the config variables are not populated. – codecowboy Feb 1 '14 at 10:24
  • 17
    WARNING! If you were using nvm or n to manage your node installs - putting /usr/local/bin/node - may not work! In order to obtain the actual path to node, use which node - then put that path before your script. E.G. I am using node 0.10.32 from nvm, so my path to node is: /home/username/.nvm/v0.10.32/bin/node – YemSalat Jun 7 '15 at 3:38
  • @YemSalat It is better to declare that in a node version indepentdent way: # doc Required to enable node/nvm for a cronjob () # doc cron uses by default a short PATH = /usr/bin:/bin and does not execute /root/.bashrc (equal to /root/.bashrc) # doc nvm (node version manager) does not configure itself in a crontab job (that is only done for interactive shells in my /root/.bashrc). export NVM_DIR="/root/.nvm" [ -s "$NVM_DIR/nvm.sh" ] && . "$NVM_DIR/nvm.sh" # This loads nvm – Rolf Dec 9 '16 at 9:41
26

Additionally, just put #!/usr/local/bin/node at the top of the script you want to execute. Then it will automatically know to execute the script with node. Make sure the file is executable as well.

  • 20
    #!/usr/bin/env node is a little more future proof as env will point to wherever your node is installed. – Mauvis Ledford Aug 1 '12 at 15:36
6

in my laptop using Linux mint the given path not working so i used this to get a work around.

$ which node

$ /usr/bin/node this worked for me.

5

These answers here saying using absolute path will all cause major problems for running a larger node app!

Real Complete Solution

Edit Cron Jobs

crontab -e

Find Node Path

which node

CD into the destination folder, then Change Cron Job according to Node Path and run script

*/2 * * * * cd /home/destination/path && /bin/node index.js

This will then allow you to run a full NodeJS application without all the errors like how using an absolute path for your index.js file.

4

I don't know if changing your relative paths in your script to absolute paths is a good idea
(what happens when your file system changes or you deploy in another environment?)

You could try wrapping it in a shell script, setting some environment variables in the crontab execution. (specifically PATH & NODE_PATH for starters)

Try my suggestion for this similar question:
https://stackoverflow.com/a/27823675/608269

1

You can also specify paths to binary files on top of your user crontab like:

PATH=/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin

* * * * * cd your/path && node foo.js
* * * * * cd your/path && npm run bar
0

Use absolute paths for the node alias and the file to be run.

Edit Cron Jobs

crontab -e

Entry to Run Our Node File

This will run every minute.

*/1 * * * * * /bin/node /public/test.js

Full Tutorial https://askmacgyver.com/blog/tutorial/how-to-run-node-scripts-from-a-cron-job

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