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In my class I've a Number property

double number;
public double Number { get => number; set { number = value; OnPropertyChanged(); } }

bound to a TextBox in xaml this way:

<TextBox Text="{Binding Number, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, StringFormat=N2}"/>

When I launch the app, the TextBox gets 0.00 automatically, probably because the value types are initialized by default. If I TAB to give TextBox focus, it doesn't select the 0.00 so I'have to manually delete the first 0, before the decimal point, there to enter some value. If I type an integer, I get the trailing .00 as expected BUT if I press . in numeric keypad to add some decimal points after the integer part, I get a red adorner around the TextBox and the .00 doesn't get deleted! So instead of pressing . and typing digits, I've to press to get to the decimal part first and type digits afterwards.

I want the TextBox to be blank/null when the app launches and when I hit . I want the trailing .00 to be replaced with whatever I type, ie. .25, thereafter If I press a button, to process the value in code, I want the TextBox to be blank/null again! How to do that?

Is there any masked TextBox to serve the purpose?

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    Oh, this is a very old problem with binding doubles. You might have to make a custom converter. – Artem K Oct 22 '19 at 5:33
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    This is one of the times I'd use a behaviour. You are causing this problem by making the binding transfer it's values every time the user presses a key. Remove UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, and the default behaviour of a textbox is to transfer value on lostfocus so you can type and correct as much as you like until you tab away. – Andy Oct 22 '19 at 7:06
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    @EmonHaque I think he's talking about a custom Behavior<T>, formerly in Windows.Interactivity, now in a standalone package. Just google WPF behaviors. – Artem K Oct 22 '19 at 9:18
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    Yes, custom. I have two pieces of code I use for this. A validator and a behaviour. Both take parameters set things like number of decimal places, min and max. This looks like one of the things I use. stackoverflow.com/questions/16914224/… behaviors are nuget nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.Xaml.Behaviors.Wpf – Andy Oct 22 '19 at 11:28
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    @EmonHaque: A double is a value type that can never be null. If you want the TextBlock to be blank, you should bind to a Nullable<double> which has a default value of null. – mm8 Oct 22 '19 at 13:46
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A double is a value type that can never be null. If you want the TextBlock to be blank, you should bind to a Nullable<double> which has a default value of null.

@mm8, that's great, it solves half of the problem and if one gets used to press right arrow instead of . for values after decimal point, it actually solves the whole problm. Is there any chance of getting unexpected value like this with Nullable<double>?

No, a Nullable<double> property can only be set to a double value or null. Nothing else. In other words, it accepts the exact same values as a double plus null (default(double?).

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