What is the best analog of MATLAB tic and toc functions ( http://www.mathworks.com/help/techdoc/ref/tic.html) in Python?

  • 4
    If you really want the direct equivalent, just call tic = time.time() and toc = time.time(), then print toc-tic, 'sec Elapsed' As folks have said below, though, timeit is more robust. – Joe Kington May 1 '11 at 16:53
  • I seem to get better results using @JoeKington's approach in conjunction with timeit.default_timer(), like this for example: tic = timeit.default_timer(); (U,S,V) = np.linalg.svd(A); toc = timeit.default_timer(), then print toc-tic. – littleO Dec 18 '16 at 23:43

11 Answers 11

up vote 114 down vote accepted

Apart from timeit which ThiefMaster mentioned, a simple way to do it is just (after importing time):

t = time.time()
# do stuff
elapsed = time.time() - t

I have a helper class I like to use:

class Timer(object):
    def __init__(self, name=None):
        self.name = name

    def __enter__(self):
        self.tstart = time.time()

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        if self.name:
            print '[%s]' % self.name,
        print 'Elapsed: %s' % (time.time() - self.tstart)

It can be used as a context manager:

with Timer('foo_stuff'):
   # do some foo
   # do some stuff

Sometimes I find this technique more convenient than timeit - it all depends on what you want to measure.

  • 18
    @eat: I respectfully disagree. People have been using the unix time command to measure runtimes of programs for ever, and this method replicates this inside Python code. I see nothing wrong with it, as long as it's the right tool for the job. timeit isn't always that, and a profiler is a much more heavyweight solution for most needs – Eli Bendersky May 2 '11 at 3:27
  • 3
    For the last line I would suggest print 'Elapsed: %.2f seconds % (time.time() - self.tstart)'. It is hard to understand without the %.2f. Thanks for great idea. – Can Kavaklıoğlu Jun 19 '13 at 15:01
  • 3
    This looks very convenient at first glance, but in practice requires one to indent the code block one wants to time, which can be quite inconvenient depending on the length of the code block and the editor of choice. Still an elegant solution, which behaves correctly in the case of nested use. – Stefan Nov 15 '13 at 8:44
  • 1
    I think you want elapsed = t - time.time(), instead of elapsed = time.time() - t. In the latter elapsed will be negative. I suggested this change as an edit. – rysqui Oct 15 '15 at 1:01
  • 1
    @rysqui - Isn't the current time always a larger number than a previous time? I would think that elapsed = time.time() - t is the form that always yields a positive value. – Scott Smith Nov 7 '17 at 22:22

I had the same question when I migrated to python from Matlab. With the help of this thread I was able to construct an exact analog of the Matlab tic() and toc() functions. Simply insert the following code at the top of your script.

import time

def TicTocGenerator():
    # Generator that returns time differences
    ti = 0           # initial time
    tf = time.time() # final time
    while True:
        ti = tf
        tf = time.time()
        yield tf-ti # returns the time difference

TicToc = TicTocGenerator() # create an instance of the TicTocGen generator

# This will be the main function through which we define both tic() and toc()
def toc(tempBool=True):
    # Prints the time difference yielded by generator instance TicToc
    tempTimeInterval = next(TicToc)
    if tempBool:
        print( "Elapsed time: %f seconds.\n" %tempTimeInterval )

def tic():
    # Records a time in TicToc, marks the beginning of a time interval
    toc(False)

That's it! Now we are ready to fully use tic() and toc() just as in Matlab. For example

tic()

time.sleep(5)

toc() # returns "Elapsed time: 5.00 seconds."

Actually, this is more versatile than the built-in Matlab functions. Here, you could create another instance of the TicTocGenerator to keep track of multiple operations, or just to time things differently. For instance, while timing a script, we can now time each piece of the script seperately, as well as the entire script. (I will provide a concrete example)

TicToc2 = TicTocGenerator() # create another instance of the TicTocGen generator

def toc2(tempBool=True):
    # Prints the time difference yielded by generator instance TicToc2
    tempTimeInterval = next(TicToc2)
    if tempBool:
    print( "Elapsed time 2: %f seconds.\n" %tempTimeInterval )

def tic2():
    # Records a time in TicToc2, marks the beginning of a time interval
    toc2(False)

Now you should be able to time two separate things: In the following example, we time the total script and parts of a script separately.

tic()

time.sleep(5)

tic2()

time.sleep(3)

toc2() # returns "Elapsed time 2: 5.00 seconds."

toc() # returns "Elapsed time: 8.00 seconds."

Actually, you do not even need to use tic() each time. If you have a series of commands that you want to time, then you can write

tic()

time.sleep(1)

toc() # returns "Elapsed time: 1.00 seconds."

time.sleep(2)

toc() # returns "Elapsed time: 2.00 seconds."

time.sleep(3)

toc() # returns "Elapsed time: 3.00 seconds."

# and so on...

I hope that this is helpful.

The absolute best analog of tic and toc would be to simply define them in python.

def tic():
    #Homemade version of matlab tic and toc functions
    import time
    global startTime_for_tictoc
    startTime_for_tictoc = time.time()

def toc():
    import time
    if 'startTime_for_tictoc' in globals():
        print "Elapsed time is " + str(time.time() - startTime_for_tictoc) + " seconds."
    else:
        print "Toc: start time not set"

Then you can use them as:

tic()
# do stuff
toc()
  • 3
    This will not behave correctly in the case of nested use of tic and toc, which Matlab supports. A little more sophistication would be required. – Stefan Nov 15 '13 at 8:37
  • 1
    I have implemented similar functions in my own code when I needed some basic timing. I would however remove the import time outside of both functions, since it can take potentially quite some time. – Bas Swinckels Nov 15 '13 at 17:19
  • If you insist on using this technique, and you need it to handle nested tic/toc, make the global a list and let tic push to it and toc pop from it. – Ahmed Fasih Aug 24 '16 at 1:26
  • Also I read elsewhere that timeit.default_timer() is better than time.time() because time.clock() might be more appropriate depending on OS – Miguel Feb 14 '17 at 21:23

Usually, IPython's %time, %timeit, %prun and %lprun (if one has line_profiler installed) satisfy my profiling needs quite well. However, a use case for tic-toc-like functionality arose when I tried to profile calculations that were interactively driven, i.e., by the user's mouse motion in a GUI. I felt like spamming tics and tocs in the sources while testing interactively would be the fastest way to reveal the bottlenecks. I went with Eli Bendersky's Timer class, but wasn't fully happy, since it required me to change the indentation of my code, which can be inconvenient in some editors and confuses the version control system. Moreover, there may be the need to measure the time between points in different functions, which wouldn't work with the with statement. After trying lots of Python cleverness, here is the simple solution that I found worked best:

from time import time
_tstart_stack = []

def tic():
    _tstart_stack.append(time())

def toc(fmt="Elapsed: %s s"):
    print fmt % (time() - _tstart_stack.pop())

Since this works by pushing the starting times on a stack, it will work correctly for multiple levels of tics and tocs. It also allows one to change the format string of the toc statement to display additional information, which I liked about Eli's Timer class.

For some reason I got concerned with the overhead of a pure Python implementation, so I tested a C extension module as well:

#include <Python.h>
#include <mach/mach_time.h>
#define MAXDEPTH 100

uint64_t start[MAXDEPTH];
int lvl=0;

static PyObject* tic(PyObject *self, PyObject *args) {
    start[lvl++] = mach_absolute_time();
    Py_RETURN_NONE;
}

static PyObject* toc(PyObject *self, PyObject *args) {
return PyFloat_FromDouble(
        (double)(mach_absolute_time() - start[--lvl]) / 1000000000L);
}

static PyObject* res(PyObject *self, PyObject *args) {
    return tic(NULL, NULL), toc(NULL, NULL);
}

static PyMethodDef methods[] = {
    {"tic", tic, METH_NOARGS, "Start timer"},
    {"toc", toc, METH_NOARGS, "Stop timer"},
    {"res", res, METH_NOARGS, "Test timer resolution"},
    {NULL, NULL, 0, NULL}
};

PyMODINIT_FUNC
inittictoc(void) {
    Py_InitModule("tictoc", methods);
}

This is for MacOSX, and I have omitted code to check if lvl is out of bounds for brevity. While tictoc.res() yields a resolution of about 50 nanoseconds on my system, I found that the jitter of measuring any Python statement is easily in the microsecond range (and much more when used from IPython). At this point, the overhead of the Python implementation becomes negligible, so that it can be used with the same confidence as the C implementation.

I found that the usefulness of the tic-toc-approach is practically limited to code blocks that take more than 10 microseconds to execute. Below that, averaging strategies like in timeit are required to get a faithful measurement.

  • Extremely elegant, @Stefan - can't believe this is so low rated. Thanks! – thclark Nov 8 '16 at 15:55

I have just created a module [tictoc.py] for achieving nested tic tocs, which is what Matlab does.

from time import time

tics = []

def tic():
    tics.append(time())

def toc():
    if len(tics)==0:
        return None
    else:
        return time()-tics.pop()

And it works this way:

from tictoc import tic, toc

# This keeps track of the whole process
tic()

# Timing a small portion of code (maybe a loop)
tic()

# -- Nested code here --

# End
toc()  # This returns the elapse time (in seconds) since the last invocation of tic()
toc()  # This does the same for the first tic()

I hope it helps.

  • Nice replication of tic/toc from MATLAB! – Matt May 23 '17 at 15:50
  • 1
    I must warn you that this might not behave as desired when used simultaneously by more than 1 module, since (AFAIK) modules behave like singletons. – antonimmo Jun 27 '17 at 18:04

Have a look at the timeit module. It's not really equivalent but if the code you want to time is inside a function you can easily use it.

  • Yes, timeit is best for benchmarks. It doesn't even have to be a single function, you can pass abritarily complex statements. – user395760 May 1 '11 at 16:49
  • 9
    Well, passing code that is not an extremely simple function call as a string is very ugly. – ThiefMaster May 1 '11 at 16:50

Just in case someone is interested. Based on all the other answers I wrote a tictoc class that has the best of them all.

The link on github is here.

You can also use pip to get it.

pip install ttictoc

As of how to use it:

Import it

from ttictoc import TicToc

Using the 'with' statement

Without creating any object you can time your code as follow.

with TicToc('name'):
  some code...

# Prints the elapsed time

Or by creating an object you can do de same.

t = TicToc('name')
with t:
  some code...

# Prints the elapsed time

Calling tic toc explicitly

You can also call the tic toc explicitply as shown bellow.

t = TicToc('name')
t.tic()
some code...
t.toc()
print(t.elapsed)
With indentation

If you want to time multiple levels of your code, you can also do it by setting 'indentation' to True.

t = TicToc(,indentation=True)
t.tic()
some code1...
t.tic()
some code2...
t.tic()
some code3...
t.toc()
print('time for code 3 ',t.elapsed)
t.toc()
print('time for code 2 with code 3 ',t.elapsed)
t.toc()
print('time for code 1 with code 2 and 3 ',t.elapsed)

Arguments

The class has 3 arguments: name,method, and indentation.

  • name: It's the name of the object. It's not required.
  • method: Indicates which method should be used to get the time.
  • indentation: Allows to use the same object several times, in different indentations to time.

The method argument can be either int, str, or your method choice. If it's a string, the valid values are time, perf_counter, and process_time. If it's an integer, the valid values are 0, 1, and 2.

  • time or 0: time.time
  • perf_counter or 1: time.perf_counter
  • process_time or 2: time.process_time

If python version >= 3.7: - time_ns or 3: time.time_ns - perf_counter_ns or 4: time.perf_counter_ns - process_time_ns or 5: time.process_time_ns

In case you prefere to use other method you just do (using as example time.clock:

TicToc(method=time.clock) 

The class is the following:

import sys
import time

class TicToc(object):
  """
  Counts the elapsed time.
  """
  def __init__(self,name='',method='time',indentation=False):
    """
    Args:
    name (str): Just informative, not needed
    method (int|str|ftn|clss): Still trying to understand the default
        options. 'time' uses the 'real wold' clock, while the other
        two use the cpu clock. If you want to use your own method, do it
        through this argument

        Valid int values:
          0: time.time  |  1: time.perf_counter  |  2: time.proces_time

          if python version >= 3.7:
          3: time.time_ns  |  4: time.perf_counter_ns  |  5: time.proces_time_ns

        Valid str values:
          'time': time.time  |  'perf_counter': time.perf_counter
          'process_time': time.proces_time

          if python version >= 3.7:
          'time_ns': time.time_ns  |  'perf_counter_ns': time.perf_counter_ns  
          'proces_time_ns': time.proces_time_ns

        Others:
          Whatever you want to use as time.time
    indentation (bool): Allows to do tic toc with indentation with a single object.
        If True, you can put several tics using the same object, and each toc will 
        correspond to the respective tic.
        If False, it will only register one single tic, and return the respective 
        elapsed time of the future tocs.
    """
    self.name = name
    self.indentation = indentation
    if self.indentation:
      self.tstart = []

    self.__measure = 's' # seconds

    self.__vsys = sys.version_info

    if self.__vsys[0]>2 and self.__vsys[1]>=7:
      # If python version is greater or equal than 3.7
      if type(method) is int:
        if method==0: method = 'time'
        elif method==1: method = 'perf_counter'
        elif method==2: method = 'process_time'
        elif method==3: method = 'time_ns'
        elif method==3: method = 'perf_counter_ns'
        elif method==4: method = 'process_time_ns'
        else: 
          import warnings
          msg = "Value '{0}' is not a valid option. Using 'time' instead.".format(method)
          warnings.warn(msg,Warning)
          method = 'time'

      if type(method) is str:
        if method=='time': self.get_time = time.time
        elif method=='perf_counter': self.get_time = time.perf_counter
        elif method=='process_time': self.get_time = time.process_time
        elif method=='time_ns': self.get_time = time.time_ns, self.__measure = 'ns' # nanoseconds
        elif method=='perf_counter_ns': self.get_time = time.perf_counter_ns, self.__measure = 'ns' # nanoseconds
        elif method=='process_time_ns': self.get_time = time.process_time_ns, self.__measure = 'ns' # nanoseconds
        else: 
          import warnings
          msg = "Value '{0}' is not a valid option. Using 'time' instead.".format(method)
          warnings.warn(msg,Warning)
          self.get_time = time.time

      else:
        self.get_time = method
    else:
      # If python vesion is lower than 3.7
      if type(method) is int:
        if method==0: method = 'time'
        elif method==1: method = 'perf_counter'
        elif method==2: method = 'process_time'
        else: 
          import warnings
          msg = "Value '{0}' is not a valid option. Using 'time' instead.".format(method)
          warnings.warn(msg,Warning)
          method = 'time'

      if type(method) is str:
        if method=='time': self.get_time = time.time
        elif method=='perf_counter': self.get_time = time.perf_counter
        elif method=='process_time': self.get_time = time.process_time
        else: 
          import warnings
          msg = "Value '{0}' is not a valid option. Using 'time' instead.".format(method)
          warnings.warn(msg,Warning)
          self.get_time = time.time

      else:
        self.get_time = method

  def __enter__(self):
    if self.indentation:
      self.tstart.append(self.get_time())
    else:
      self.tstart = self.get_time()

  def __exit__(self,type,value,traceback):
    self.tend = self.get_time()
    if self.indentation:
      self.elapsed = self.tend - self.tstart.pop()
    else:
      self.elapsed = self.tend - self.tstart

    if self.name!='': name = '[{}] '.format(self.name)
    else: name = self.name

    print('{0}Elapsed time: {1} ({2})'.format(name,self.elapsed,self.__measure))

  def tic(self):
    if self.indentation:
      self.tstart.append(self.get_time())
    else:
      self.tstart = self.get_time()

  def toc(self):
    self.tend = self.get_time()
    if self.indentation:
      if len(self.tstart)>0:
        self.elapsed = self.tend - self.tstart.pop()
      else:
        self.elapsed = None
    else:
      self.elapsed = self.tend - self.tstart

This can also be done using a wrapper. Very general way of keeping time.

The wrapper in this example code wraps any function and prints the amount of time needed to execute the function:

def timethis(f):
    import time

    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        start = time.time()
        r = f(*args, **kwargs)
        print "Executing {0} took {1} seconds".format(f.func_name,  time.time()-start)
        return r
    return wrapped

@timethis
def thistakestime():
    for x in range(10000000):
        pass

thistakestime()

I changed @Eli Bendersky's answer a little bit to use the ctor __init__() and dtor __del__() to do the timing, so that it can be used more conveniently without indenting the original code:

class Timer(object):
    def __init__(self, name=None):
        self.name = name
        self.tstart = time.time()

    def __del__(self):
        if self.name:
            print '%s elapsed: %.2fs' % (self.name, time.time() - self.tstart)
        else:
            print 'Elapsed: %.2fs' % (time.time() - self.tstart)

To use, simple put Timer("blahblah") at the beginning of some local scope. Elapsed time will be printed at the end of the scope:

for i in xrange(5):
    timer = Timer("eigh()")
    x = numpy.random.random((4000,4000));
    x = (x+x.T)/2
    numpy.linalg.eigh(x)
    print i+1
timer = None

It prints out:

1
eigh() elapsed: 10.13s
2
eigh() elapsed: 9.74s
3
eigh() elapsed: 10.70s
4
eigh() elapsed: 10.25s
5
eigh() elapsed: 11.28s
  • 2
    An issue with this implementation is the fact, that timer is not deleted after the last call, if any other code follows after the for loop. To get the last timer value, one should delete or overwrite the timer after the for loop, e.g. via timer = None. – bastelflp Jul 5 '16 at 15:41
  • 1
    @bastelflp Just realized that I misunderstood what you meant... Your suggestion has been incorporated in the code now. Thanks. – Shaohua Li Aug 30 '17 at 5:38

Building on Stefan and antonimmo's answers, I ended up putting

def Tictoc():
    start_stack = []
    start_named = {}

    def tic(name=None):
        if name is None:
            start_stack.append(time())
        else:
            start_named[name] = time()

    def toc(name=None):
        if name is None:
            start = start_stack.pop()
        else:
            start = start_named.pop(name)
        elapsed = time() - start
        return elapsed
    return tic, toc

in a utils.py module, and I use it with a

from utils import Tictoc
tic, toc = Tictoc()

This way

  • you can simply use tic(), toc() and nest them like in Matlab
  • alternatively, you can name them: tic(1), toc(1) or tic('very-important-block'), toc('very-important-block') and timers with different names won't interfere
  • importing them this way prevents interference between modules using it.

(here toc does not print the elapsed time, but returns it.)

Updating Eli's answer to Python 3:

class Timer(object):
    def __init__(self, name=None, filename=None):
        self.name = name
        self.filename = filename

    def __enter__(self):
        self.tstart = time.time()

    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        message = 'Elapsed: %.2f seconds' % (time.time() - self.tstart)
        if self.name:
            message = '[%s] ' % self.name + message
        print(message)
        if self.filename:
            with open(self.filename,'a') as file:
                print(str(datetime.datetime.now())+": ",message,file=file)

Just like Eli's, it can be used as a context manager:

import time 
with Timer('Count'):
    for i in range(0,10_000_000):
        pass

Output:

[Count] Elapsed: 0.27 seconds

I have also updated it to print the units of time reported (seconds) and trim the number of digits as suggested by Can, and with the option of also appending to a log file. You must import datetime to use the logging feature:

import time
import datetime 
with Timer('Count', 'log.txt'):    
    for i in range(0,10_000_000):
        pass

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