6

Very simplified example (nevermind what the class A and operators are doing, it's just for example):

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <bool is_signed>
class A {
public:
    // implicit conversion from int
    A(int a) : a_{is_signed ? -a : a}
    {}

    int a_;
};

bool operator==(A<true> lhs, A<true> rhs) {
    return lhs.a_ == rhs.a_;
}

bool operator==(A<false> lhs, A<false> rhs) {
    return lhs.a_ == rhs.a_;
}

int main() {
    A<true> a1{123};
    A<false> a2{123};

    cout << (a1 == 123) << endl;
    cout << (a2 == 123) << endl;

    return 0;
}

This works.

But if I replace two operator=='s (with same body) with template:

template <bool is_signed>
bool operator==(A<is_signed> lhs, A<is_signed> rhs) {
    return lhs.a_ == rhs.a_;
}

, its compilation produces errors:

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
prog.cpp:31:14: error: no match for ‘operator==’ (operand types are ‘A<true>’ and ‘int’)
  cout << (a1 == 123) << endl;
           ~~~^~~~~~
prog.cpp:23:6: note: candidate: ‘template<bool is_signed> bool operator==(A<is_signed>, A<is_signed>)’
 bool operator==(A<is_signed> lhs, A<is_signed> rhs) {
      ^~~~~~~~
prog.cpp:23:6: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
prog.cpp:31:17: note:   mismatched types ‘A<is_signed>’ and ‘int’
  cout << (a1 == 123) << endl;
                 ^~~

Is it possible to use template here? Can I use C++17 user-defined template deduction guides somehow? Or anything else?

4

Template argument deduction does not take implicit conversions into account. You need again two overloaded comparison operators.

template <bool is_signed>
bool operator==(A<is_signed> lhs, A<is_signed> rhs) {
    return lhs.a_ == rhs.a_;
}

template <bool is_signed>
bool operator==(A<is_signed> lhs, int rhs) {
    return lhs == A<is_signed>(rhs);
}
4

Implicit conversions are not considered in template argument deduction, which causes the deduction for is_signed fails on the 2nd function argument.

Type deduction does not consider implicit conversions (other than type adjustments listed above): that's the job for overload resolution, which happens later.

If you always use the operator== in the style like a1 == 123, i.e. an A<is_signed> is always used as the 1st operand, you can exclude the 2nd function parameter from the deduction. e.g.

template <bool is_signed>
bool operator==(A<is_signed> lhs, std::type_identity_t<A<is_signed>> rhs) {
    return lhs.a_ == rhs.a_;
}

LIVE

PS: std::type_identity is supported since C++20; even it's not hard to implement one.

  • One could also add the operator the other way around, but that takes extra effort to remove the ambiguity when comparing As without implicit comparison (e.g. another overload without any std::type_identity_t). godbolt.org/z/J39Veq – Max Langhof Oct 22 at 16:08
4

Another alternative is friend function, so the function is not template, but use the template argument:

template <bool is_signed>
class A {
public:
    // implicit conversion from int
    A(int a) : a_{is_signed ? -a : a}
    {}

    int a_;

    friend bool operator==(const A& lhs, const A& rhs) {
        return lhs.a_ == rhs.a_;
    }
};

Demo

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