1

Ignoring for now the arguments about whether the Repository Pattern should be used with EF, I'd like to ask if EF should return tracked entities. Take, for example, the following code whose Get() method returns a tracked entity.

public virtual async Task<TSqlTable> Get(int id)
{
    var result = await _dbContext.Set<TSqlTable>().Where(set => set.Id == id).SingleOrDefaultAsync();
    return result;
}

public async Task<TSqlTable> Update(TSqlTable item)
{
    _dbContext.Set<TSqlTable>().Update(item);
    await _dbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
    return item;
}

This means that obj2 would be saved in the following code, even though I'm calling update on obj1:

var obj1 = await repo.Get(1);
var obj2 = await repo.Get(2);
obj2.MyProp = "changed";
await repo.Update(obj1);

Would it make more sense to add AsNoTracking() to the Get() method so that nothing outside of the repo is tracked?

public virtual async Task<TSqlTable> Get(int id)
{
    var result = await _dbContext.Set<TSqlTable>().Where(set => set.Id == id).AsNoTracking().SingleOrDefaultAsync();
    return result;
}

public async Task<TSqlTable> Update(TSqlTable item)
{
    _dbContext.Set<TSqlTable>().Update(item);
    await _dbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
    return item;
}
1
  • In case you are not changing returned entities it doesn't make sense to track them. Tracking is just adding overhead with no benefit. – dropoutcoder Oct 22 '19 at 19:07
3

A repository pattern can serve as a good abstraction between the business logic and the DbContext for testing purposes. While you can mock a DbContext, it's not pretty by any stretch and mocking a repository call is a lot simpler. I consider a generic repository pattern however, as an anti-pattern. They either end up anemic, doing nothing of any benefit, or overly complex trying to abstract away EF-isms from calling code. You also end up stacking up a significant number of repository dependencies in your controllers/services just to get anything non-trivial done.

For instance if I have a CreateOrderController to service a order creation screen, I will want to be able to create orders, orderlines, and provide lists of products as well as associate customers. With generic repositories:

public CreateOrderController(IUnitOfWorkFactory unitOfWorkFactory, 
   IOrderRepository orderRepository,  
   IOrderLineRepository orderLineRepository, 
   IProductRepository productRepository, 
   ICustomerRepository customerRepository)
{  /* ... */ }

Where each repository is a Repository<T> and I try to leverage generic methods. Invariably I'm going to have methods that are specific to an Order, or other entity which will deviate from the common generic flavour. I'm also going to potentially compromise on returning details that I don't need. For instance if it was a ManageOrderController and I want to know if any of the order lines contain a product: Either I have a specific method in the OrderLineRepository:

bool HasOrderLineWithProduct(int orderId, int productId);

... and my repository is littered with methods like this for every scenario, or my controller code is littered with use of inefficient "generic" methods like:

var orderLines = _orderLineRepository.GetOrderLinesForOrder(orderId);
var hasProduct = orderLines.Any(x => x.ProductId == productId);

The problem here is that my repository has loaded all order lines for that order to memory just so I could perform an exists check with further criteria against them. It's not ideal.

As David points out, to leverage a repository with EF, you should embrace IQueryable and a unit of work pattern to manage the lifetime scope of your DbContext. Worst case the DbContext can be scoped to the web request and injected into your controllers, services, and repositories. I prefer to use explicit scoping though so that it is crystal clear who is responsible for committing the unit of work. With IQueryable, the business logic can manage the scope, and determine how it wants to consume the data rather than either presenting a lot of similar methods in the repository, or a lot of conditional complexity.

For the above example for a CreateOrderController, I would have something that looks more like:

public CreateOrderController(IUnitOfWorkFactory unitOfWorkFactory,,
     ICreateOrderRepository createOrderRepository)
{  /* ... */ }

... where the repository serves this controller. Simpler to set up test mocks. Where I need to retrieve a customer, or product references, the repository can serve those:

IQueryable<Customer> GetCustomerById(int customerId);
IQueryable<Product> GetAllProducts();

Why IQueryable when I just expect one customer? Because that gives my consuming code full control over how that code is consumed. I might want the single entity, or I might want to do an exists check (.Any()) or select just a subset of detail about them. The same goes for fetching the products. Chances are I want to populate a simple list of view models with the product ID and name for the create UI to select from. The repository implementation enforces base-level rules such as authentication/authorization checks, and stuff like IsActive checks to return just active data in soft-delete scenarios.

In the above case where I have a controller (and repository) that I want to check for the existance of OrderLines for a given product:

var hasProduct = manageOrderRepository.GetOrderById(orderId).SelectMany(o => o.OrderLines).Any(ol => ol.Product.ProductId == productId);

By returning an IQueryable, consuming code can leverage Linq to do whatever it needs. GetOrderById can be mocked out for testing purposes to return a stub entity with relevant details for a test, an empty list, etc. We don't need dozens of scenario-based methods, or perform expensive queries. There are no complex expression tree arguments in the repository to provide dynamic filtering, sorting, or pagination. Linq and IQueryable already provide that. It doesn't "leak" EF-isms any more than complex expressions would since any expressions and such passed into a repository would still need to conform to EF's rules. The result is the ability to leverage strictly efficient queries.

The repository also serves as a factory for new entities. When I go to create a new Order, I don't leave that up to my controller/service to:

var newOrder = new Order();
// populate order lines.
context.Orders.Add(newOrder);
context.SaveChanges();

instead, my repository exposes a CreateOrder method:

Order CreateOrder(string OrderNumber, Customer customer, IEnumerable<Product> products);

That might be a CustomerId and set of ProductIds instead, depending on how I structure the system... In either case the repository validates that the required information is present then creates the order entity, associates these required details, and adds it to the DbSet and returns it. Anything that is non-nullable will be required in the factory method. This ensures that any created entity is always in a minimum viable valid state. Any optional details can be set on the returned order before the controller/service calls SaveChanges on the unit of work. A factory could be considered a separate concern and a separate class, but I give this responsibility to the repository since it has all of the access needed to perform this duty.

There are trade-offs with any approach around repositories like this. Some people will state "what about DRY?! (Don't Repeat Yourself)" given that multiple repositories can, and will be querying the same entities. This is absolutely true, however I personally believe KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) trumps DRY, and that leveraging a repository to serve a controller or service better satisfies SRP. (Single Responsibility Principle) When you split off repositories per entity to satisfy DRY, your repository now has more than one reason to change. To try and re-use code, those methods now get called by different areas that can, and often do have different needs. DRY is an optimization step, and should apply to "identical" not merely "similar" code and concerns. When I re-factor a CreateOrderRepository or ManageOrderRepository, it is only for that one purpose. I don't need to worry about possible side-effects from optimizations that might impact other areas or break other tests. Generally, any duplication between repositories will be on read-type querying which is pretty simple stuff. The other trade-off for a bit of duplication is not needing to declare extra dependencies everywhere. (requiring mocks etc. when testing) There will be elements of code that I do consolidate, but it is a later-stage optimization when I know the functionality is both stable, and identical.

That will hopefully be some food for though around using repositories with EF.

1

Like many of the issues with wrapping EF DbContext in an additional Repository layer, you need to decide who decides. It's not the Repository that should determine whether the entities are tracked, it's the code that uses the Repository that should. So your second-layer Repository should have some method for the calling code to declare its intent for entity tracking.

This is one of the many reasons why a well-designed Repository should expose Entities as IQueryable<TEntity> instead of IEnumerable<TEntity> or TEntity.

Because you decided to take the query design away from the calling code and implement in your repository wrapper, you now need to provide a way for the calling code to configure the query's tracking behavior.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.