6

I have the following snippet.

template< typename T >
struct f
{
  template< typename V >
  struct a : f
  {};
};

int main ()
{
  f<int>::a<int>::a<double> x;
}

It compiles with no warnings on GCC 4.4.5 and also MSVC 2010, but not on GCC 4.5.2 -- on which I get the following errors:

test.cc: In function 'int main()':
test.cc:11:21: error: expected primary-expression before 'double'
test.cc:11:21: error: expected ';' before 'double'

So while I don't see anything non-standard about it, the question is obligatory -- is this legal in C++? Also, if it is, how do I file a bug report at GCC? (:

edit: A little background for the curious:

This is supposed to be a piece of template metaprogramming. f basically has the structure of a template metafunction class with apply substituted for a (of course the nested type of apply is omitted so we can concentrate on the structure itself).

Inheritance in this case is a standard device for binding metafunction return values. What this snippet is trying to achieve is a metafunction class that recursively yields itself when evaluated.

edit2: let me put the same snippet a bit differently:

template< typename T >
struct f
{
  template< typename V > struct a;
};

template< typename T >
template< typename V >
struct f<T>::a : f<T>
{};

int main ()
{
  f<int>::a<int>::a<double> x;
}

This produces the same error. I think it refutes the incomplete type argument.

30
  • 7
    I don't think this is valid. f is incomplete when a is declared so it cannot be used as a base class. Commented May 1, 2011 at 21:49
  • Is the template stuff a red herring? What happens if you just make it a bunch of normal classes? Commented May 1, 2011 at 21:53
  • @OliCharlesworth I think what James said would definitely apply if it were normal classes.
    – xcvii
    Commented May 1, 2011 at 22:04
  • @xcvii: Then why would it be any different for class templates? Commented May 1, 2011 at 22:05
  • @OliCharlesworth because of lazy template instantiation? Just guessing (:
    – xcvii
    Commented May 1, 2011 at 22:08

4 Answers 4

4

There were a couple of good notes in existing answers. First, f's type is incomplete at the time the nested class template is defined, but f is a dependent type. Now, if you instantiate the nesting template (f), it will instantiate a declaration of the nested template (the member). Note that the declaration of the member does not include the base clause list, so it doesn't need complete base classes. Once the nesting template has been instantiated implicitly, f is complete and when it comes to instantiating the definition of the member, there should be no issue anymore. So I don't think that comeau is correct complaining here.

The other bug is that, in fact, f<int>::a<int>::a is naming the constructor of a<int>, and requires it to be a constructor template (with <int> being the template arguments). The base of this was DR #147.

The translation to the constructor is not done when the qualifier name isn't the class of the injected class name. For example, if it is a derived class, your code becomes valid (as some answers figured out).

5
  • nice, thanks! although i'm not sure if i completely grasp it yet: so basically every appearance of A::A (where A is a class) denotes the constructor? even if i try to access a member of the "second" A?
    – xcvii
    Commented May 3, 2011 at 7:44
  • @xcvii, no. If you try to access a member and use ::, then not, because lookup for a name prior to :: only considers class and namespace names (and in C++0x, enumerations), ignoring all other names. I.e struct Foo { typedef int bar; }; Foo::Foo::bar x; is valid. Commented May 3, 2011 at 17:11
  • @Johannes ok, so suppose a in the original snippet has a nested typedef t. if i understand right, it makes f<int>::a<int>::a<double>::t x; a valid declaration. is that correct?
    – xcvii
    Commented May 3, 2011 at 17:29
  • 1
    @xcvii, yes, that should be alright. When looking up a, it should only consider classes, enumerations, class templates and (for C++0x) alias templates. It should ignore function templates and function names (in other words, it should not translate the a to a constructor name). However this was clarified only in C++0x which added ".. and templates whose specializations are types." to the list that are only considered. GCC appears to not apply this restriction of lookup to a, since it still does the constructor name translation. Commented May 3, 2011 at 17:40
  • Just noticed this was your 2000th answer (with most of my questions in those). Nice one!
    – Tom
    Commented May 5, 2011 at 19:38
2

Nice question. This seems to be an issue with gcc for template recursive declaration. Because, had there been solid classes then it gives error and ideally it should be declared as:

struct Out {
  struct In;
};
struct Out::In : Out {};
4
  • also, with this example, the following seems to work: int main() { typename Out::In::In x; } although i wasn't able to transfer this pattern to the original code
    – xcvii
    Commented May 2, 2011 at 18:28
  • @xcvii, that is a known bug in GCC. typename Out::In::In should be invalid, because typename should not ignore non-type names (however, GCC doesn't follow that rule). So the injected-class-name2constructor translation should still be done. But you can say struct Out::In::In x; and it should be fine. Commented May 2, 2011 at 19:49
  • @Johannes, "typename should not ignore non-type names" -- what do you mean by this? what is the non-type name it erroneously ignores here?
    – xcvii
    Commented May 3, 2011 at 7:46
  • @xcvii the translation from In::In (the injected class name) to the constructors of In is only done if the lookup context for In::In doesn't ignore non-type names. For example struct In::In is fine. But typename In::In is not. GCC makes typename ignore non-type names: struct A { int B; struct B { }; }; typename A::B a;` GCC compiles this example, but it should not do so - the A::B should fail, and refer to the data member. Commented May 3, 2011 at 17:10
1

it looks like GCC 4.5 believes you have specified the constructor.

one possible workaround:

template<typename T>
struct f {

    template<typename V>
    struct a : f {

        template<typename Z>
        struct q {
            typedef a<Z> Q;
        };
    };
};

int main() {
    f<int>::a<int>::q<double>::Q x;
    return 0;
}
0

Using Comeau online, it suggests that f is an incomplete type at the point you use it as a base class, and as such is unsuitable.

"ComeauTest.c", line 5: error: incomplete type is not allowed
    struct a : f

I don't have a clang instance at hand unfortunately.

1
  • clang++ 2.9 compiles the snippet.
    – user355252
    Commented May 2, 2011 at 10:27

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