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I believe this isn't legal html, correct? as far as I can tell, almost every browser display/executes this anyway anything I can do as an enduser?

the problem: its stuff added by free hosting provider, i don't really want to see it if its outside html tags, I don't care what it is. If there's a setting/button for firefox I'd like to know, thanks

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  • That is the cost of doing business with a free host like geocities. Live with it or start paying for web hosting.
    – BoltBait
    Feb 26, 2009 at 0:23

7 Answers 7

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I believe this isn't legal html, correct?

Correct.

.. as far as I can tell, almost every browser display/executes this anyway ..

Yes - Browsers try to get the best out of the mess that they get served.

.. anything I can do as an enduser?

What is the problem you're having with it?

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Correct, it's not legal HTML. However, browsers have always attempted to render pretty much anything, no matter how malformed, in order not to make creating HTML pages difficult for people who might not understand the standard completely. Unfortunately, this has resulted in a widespread complete disregard for the standard.

There is apparently a way to configure Opera not to use the "quirks mode" and stick to the letter of the standard.

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the problem: its stuff added by free hosting provider, i don't really want to see it if its outside html tags, I don't care what it is. If there's a setting/button for firefox I'd like to know

For you:

  • install AdBlock Plus
  • create a new Element Hiding Rule: (affected.domain.com##HTML + *), effectively selecting all siblings to the HTML element

For all other people visiting your web site, either:

  • make them do what you did, or
  • at your own risk, break the rules of your hosting provider by adding a CSS rule similar the one above to your page, or
  • live with it, or
  • change to a paid hosting provider who do not attach ads to your page
0

put just open p tag, (no closing p tag) after tag, then put this below code inside your stylesheet. it worked in firefox 4.

put p tag like this: </html><p>.... then add to your stylesheet: html p{display:none}
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Firefox adheres to strict html 4 I think. You can also switch modes in firefox to "strict"

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  • 1
    No browser could reach the number of users Firefox has if it didn't attempt to render malformed HTML. I'd be very interested to learn how to switch on that "strict mode", however. Feb 25, 2009 at 9:29
  • @Michael: +1 for that bold statement of the truth.
    – Cerebrus
    Feb 25, 2009 at 9:41
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I have not tried it, but if you want to get rid of it for everybody, you could try something in your style-sheet like:

    img {
        display: none;
    }
    body img {
        display: inline;
    }

This should remove all images outside the body but I don´t know how the browser will handle the images and the styles when it is not valid html.

You can do the same for other elements if it works (obviously not the <script> tag).

Edit: It does not work with the body tag, but it does with a div inside the body tag, so if your content is located in a tag with id contents, this works (in IE7 and Firefox 3 at least):

    img {
        display: none;
    }
    #contents img {
        display: inline;
    }
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The practice of putting the outside of the <html> comes from an advice to place the script after all content or on the bootom of the page (done correctly placed before BODY end tag) in order to execute script only after page is loaded and all content is available, mitigating the need for other document ready solutions.

The practice to put <img> outside the <html> does not make any sense at all.

HTML tag is root of the document and can contain only HEAD and BODY. Putting tags outside the root invalidates the document.

There is no merit or advantage of doing so.

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