1

I have a Windows machine with the current user in C:\Users\User.

I have an executable in another drive, let's say at D:\Folder\MyProg.exe.

  1. Opening command prompt, it starts in the directory C:\Users\User
  2. I type the command: start D:\Folder\MyProg.exe or D:\Folder\MyProg.exe
  3. The exe fails to open, with a pop-up: MyProg has encountered an error

In order to run start the .exe from command prompt, I have to cd to the other directory and then start the exe.

  1. Opening command prompt, it starts in the directory C:\Users\User
  2. I type the command: cd /d D:\Folder && start MyProg.exe
  3. The exe successfully opens.

Is there a better way to, from C:, start an executable in another drive?


Reproducing

Windows 10 Pro, v1809 (I don't think the version really matters)

My real use case is industrial automation, but one can observe the same result with convert.exe (cnet download link)

5
  • Have you tried without start?
    – aschipfl
    Oct 23 '19 at 18:10
  • 1
    In what way does MyProg.exe fail to start? Is there an error message? If so, please copy and paste it as text into the question. It seems likely that MyProg.exe is looking for files to be in the same directory where it is located.
    – lit
    Oct 23 '19 at 18:51
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    A good coded executable should run independent on what is the current directory on starting it. So the usage of full qualified file name like "D:\Folder\MyProg.exe" should be always enough to start an executable. But some programs are not good coded. Such programs depend on files in directory of the program and do not use appropriate code to reference those files from within the program with program files path, but use instead a relative path. For such not good coded executables it is necessary that the working directory on start of the executable is the program files directory.
    – Mofi
    Oct 24 '19 at 6:19
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    The solution is using command start which offers option /D to define the start in (current directory) for the started program. Example: start "" /D"D:\Folder" "MyProg.exe". Run in a command prompt window start /? and read the output help. The title "" is in this case an empty string which is enough if the started application is a GUI application. But if the started program is a console application, it would be better to use a meaningful title for the opened console window. cmd.exe waits for termination with adding /WAIT left to "MyProg.exe".
    – Mofi
    Oct 24 '19 at 6:25
  • Thank you @Mofi! So that there can be an answer on this question, I converted your comments to an answer below. Thanks again for the pointers. Oct 24 '19 at 16:12
2

As commented by @Mofi, I realized the answer is most likely this:

But some programs are not good coded. Such programs depend on files in directory of the program and do not use appropriate code to reference those files from within the program with program files path, but use instead a relative path

As he instructed in the next comment, start provides a /d parameter that lets you specify a startup directory. Thus, a concise command would be:

start "" /d D:\Folder MyProg.exe

Note: the "" is for the <Title> field. The .exe I am opening is a GUI application (not a console application), so it is not necessary in this case, I just included in case other viewers find this useful in their application.

1

I have a Windows machine with the current user in C:\Users\User.

I have an executable in another drive, let's say at D:\Folder\MyProg.exe.

Opening command prompt, it starts in the directory C:\Users\User I type the command: start D:\Folder\MyProg.exe The exe fails to open.

In order to run start the .exe from command prompt, I have to cd to the other directory and then start the exe.

Maybe not. Try:

PATH D:\Folder;%Path%
"D:\Folder\MyProg.exe"
1
  • Thank you @BenPersonick!! That was a useful answer, I hadn't thought of updating the path! However, sadly, this was not the solution, it still errored out. Thank you again for posting though! :) Oct 24 '19 at 16:02

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