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I need some help with Powershell, i hope somebody can help.

I want to store multiple Variables into one single variable.

Here is my code:

$Content = @"
$Var1 = "1"
$Var2 = "2"
$Var3 = "3"
"@   

echo $Content

And thats my output:

echo $Content
 = "1"
 = "2"
 = "3"

It should look like this:

$Var1 = "1", etc...

But every variable gets removed. I don't know why. Could somebody please explain this? Do i need to store them into something like an object?

Thanks in advance!

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  • Everything with $ in the beginning is interpreted as a variable name in powershell. You have to escape the $ if you want that inside a string. So use ``$ or instead of the double quotas (") the single (') one. --> '@$Var = "1"'@' – Patrick Oct 24 '19 at 10:50
  • if you replace the double quotes with single quotes, then PoSh will NOT try to expand your $Vars. try '$Var' and "$Var" when there is nothing in the variable to display ... [grin] please take a look at >>> about_Quoting_Rules <<< – Lee_Dailey Oct 24 '19 at 11:20
  • Good to know Thank you very much! – Pogo Peter Oct 24 '19 at 11:30
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The quickest fix for your situation is to switch to a single-quoted here-string.

$Content = @'
$Var1 = "1"
$Var2 = "2"
$Var3 = "3"
'@ 

In general, double quotes around a string instruct PowerShell to interpolate. Single quotes around a string tells PowerShell to treat the content as a literal string. This also applies to here-strings (@""@ and @''@).

# Double Quotes

$string = "my string"
"$string"
my string

@"
$string
"@
my string

# Single Quotes

'$string'
$string

@'
$string
'@
$string

When interpolation happens, variables are expanded and evaluated. A variable is identified starting with the $ character until an illegal character for a variable name is read. Notice in the example below, how the variable interpolation stops at the ..

"$string.length"
my string.length

You can use escape characters or other operators to control interpolation within double quoted strings. The subexpression operator $() allows an expression to be evaluated before it is converted into a string.

"$($string.length)"
9

The backtick character is the PowerShell escape character. It can be used to escape $ when you don't want it to be treated as a variable.

"`$string"
$string

Mixing quotes can create certain gotchas. If you surround your string with single quotes, everything inside will be a literal string regardless of using escape characters or subexpressions.

'"$($string.length)"'
"$($string.length)"

'"`$string"'
"`$string"

Surrounding your string with double quotes with inside single quotes will just treat the inside single quotes literally because the outer quotes determine how the string will be interpreted.

"'$string'"
'my string'

Using multiple single quote pairs or double quote pairs requires special treatment. In this unique situation for double quotes, you can use the backtick escape or a two " to print a single ".

"""$string"""
"my string"

"`"$string`""
"my string"

For multiple single quotes, you must use two ' because a backtick will be treated literally and not tell PowerShell to escape anything.

'''$string'''
'$string'

Please reference About_Quoting_Rules for official documentation.

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  • Thanks a lot :)! – Pogo Peter Oct 24 '19 at 11:30

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