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I am trying to write a function on C++ for a constructor of Legendre polynomials that prints out the coefficients of the polynomial of degree m. The polynomials follow a simple recursion relation.

Now, I am trying to implement that relation and it works perfectly for every n up to 8,starting from 9, around the 7th iteration it picks up a trash value that is not even in any of the previous vectors of coeffcients. I wonder how can I solve this. I present you my code:

#include <vector>
#include <cmath>
std::vector<double> set_coeffs(int m){
std::vector<double> coeffs;

if (m == 0) //Casos iniciales para empezar la recursión
{               
    coeffs.push_back(1);
} else if (m == 1)
{
    coeffs.push_back(1);
    coeffs.push_back(0);
} else if (m == 2) //Puse también el caso 2 porque de otro modo ocurre el mismo problema pero desde n=5
{
    coeffs.push_back(1.5);
    coeffs.push_back(0);
    coeffs.push_back(-0.5);
} 
 else
{
    std::vector<double> v = set_coeffs(m-1);
    std::vector<double> u = set_coeffs(m-2);
    std::cout << "inicia cicle" << std::endl;

    double a = (2* ((double)m) -1)/((double)m);
    double b = (((double)m)-1)/((double)m);

    coeffs.push_back(a*v[0]);
    coeffs.push_back(a*v[1]);

    for (int i = 0; i < m-1; i++)
    {
        double c = a*v[i+2] - b*u[i];
        std::cout << m << " " << v[i+2] << " " << u[i] << " " << c <<std::endl;
        coeffs.push_back(c);
    }

    std::cout << "termina cicle" << std::endl;
} 
return coeffs;
}
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As noted in interjay's answer, the posted code doesn't correctly take into account the differences in the sizes of the vector.

To make the indices matching easier (IMHO, at least, but it should also help in further calculations involving those coefficients), I'd store the coefficients in the opposite order. I'd take advantage of their particular pattern (only the odd ones or the even ones are non zero), too.

It may be worth mentioning that a recursive approach of this kind is going to be inefficient, when applied to large vectors.

That said, this is a possible implementation:

std::vector<double> Legendre_coefficients(int m)
{
    if (m == 0) 
    {               
        return {1};
    }
    if (m == 1)
    {
        return {0, 1};
    }

    // Initialize with zero, only at most (half + 1) of the terms will be changed later
    std::vector<double> coeffs(m + 1);

    // Consider some form of memoization instead of this recursion
    std::vector<double> v = Legendre_coefficients(m - 1);
    std::vector<double> u = Legendre_coefficients(m - 2);

    // using literals of floating point type, 'm' is promoted by the compiler
    double a = (2.0 * m - 1.0) / m;
    double b = (m - 1.0) / m;

    int first = 1;
    // If 'm' is even, so is (m - 2) and its first element is zero. It can be skipped.
    // It also avoids annoying '-0' in the output 
    if ( m % 2 == 0 )
    {
        coeffs[0] = -b * u[0];
        first = 2;
    }
    for (int i = first; i < m - 1; i += 2)
    {
        coeffs[i] = (a * v[i - 1] - b * u[i]);
    }
    coeffs[m] = a * v[m - 1];

    return coeffs;
}

Testable here.

| improve this answer | |
  • Wow, thanks a lot! This definitely helped. Out of curiosity, where would be a good way to start looking to improve the efficiency of this algorithm? – user371816 Oct 24 '19 at 22:54
  • @user371816 Well, If you need a single set of coefficients of an m grade polynomial, just use a loop (non recursive) to evaluate those, starting from say, 2, up to m. If you need many of them, store the vectors in, say, a vector of vectors and calculate a new one (from the lower ones) only if m is greater than the last evaluated. – Bob__ Oct 25 '19 at 6:31
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Calling set_coeffs(n) returns a vector with n+1 elements.

Therefore, std::vector<double> v = set_coeffs(m-1); has m elements.

In your for loop, i runs from 0 to m-2, and you access v[i+2]. On the last iteration, this will access v[m] which is out of bounds.

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