1

What is the best practice for handling message strings that are shown to the client as errors or notifications so as not to have in hard code, both on the typescript side and in htlm?

It occurs to me for example : In html:

<h1> {{header_message}} </h1>

In typescript:

let notificationInfo: string = 'notifications.infoMessage';
5

Usually you would create some sort of a constants file for your messages (or any other strings for that matter, for example strings used in comparison expressions). You can have a single module-specific constants file, for example:

Declaration

constants/
  message.constants.ts
components/
  ...
notification.module.ts

In that file you want to export a constant:

export const MESSAGES = {
  alerts: {
    success: 'Operation completed succesfully.',
    warning: 'Your changes may be lost.'
    },
  notification: {
    info: 'For your information...',
  },
  header: 'Alerts & Notifications'
}

Usage

Then you can import this constants file into any of your components as needed:

import { MESSAGES } from '../constants/message.constants';

And then in the component class itself, assign the import to a property:

class MessageNotification {
  messages = MESSAGES;
  notificationInfo = this.messages.notification.info;
}

You can also access them in your template:

<h1> {{ messages.header }} </h1>

Later as the number of messages grows, they can be refactored into multiple constants files grouped by feature, topic, kind etc.

Benefits

There are a few benefits of externalizing the string literals:

  1. Easier to update the messages since they are all in one place.
  2. Easier to review all messages at once for wording consitency.
  3. Translations: if you require multi-lingual features, with some adjustments, you can easily show strings depending on the language.
  4. Re-use: if the same message shows up in multiple places, you can re-use it instead of copying/pasting, and to update you only update one instance.
1
  • Thank so much! is very useful! – BryGom Oct 25 '19 at 5:58

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