74
class Users < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :meetings, :through => :meeting_participations
  has_many :meeting_participations
end

class Meetings < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users, :through => :meeting_participations
  has_many :meeting_participations
end

class MeetingParticipations < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :meeting

  scope :hidden, where(:hidden => true)
  scope :visible, where(:hidden => false)
end

hidden is an extra boolean column within the m2m association table. Given some Users instance current_user, I want to do

current_user.meetings.visible

which will retrieve a collection of Meetings for which the user is a participant where the hidden column is false. The closest I have gotten is adding the following scope to the Meetings class

scope :visible, joins(:meeting_participations) & MeetingParticipation.visible

The scope does filter the Meetings against the MeetingParticipations table, however there is no join/condition against the MeetingParticipations table related to current_user.

The issue with this is, if current_user and another_user are both participants for some Meetings instance, a Meetings record in the result set will be returned for each participant that has hidden set to false. If current_user has true set for hidden for all Meetings, if another_user is a participant in any of those same Meetings with hidden set to false, those Meetings will appear in the Meetings.visible result set.

Is it possible to have a scope as I've mentioned above which will properly join on the User instance? If not, can someone recommend a solution to this?

0
102

This is my solution for your problem:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :meeting_participations
  has_many :meetings, :through => :meeting_participations do
   def visible
     where("meeting_participations.visible = ?", true)
   end
  end
end

@user.meetings.visible

5
  • Thanks for this, definitely the simpler answer.
    – deefour
    Mar 3 '12 at 16:15
  • 2
    Anyone have a suggestion on throwing in some eager loading in this context? Like if a meeting belongs to a venue and I want to eager load those? Oct 10 '13 at 16:48
  • So I guess this does work: includes([:assoc1, :assoc2]).where....geez I thought sure I had tried that before commenting. Oct 11 '13 at 21:46
  • @andrei Yes.. and this is what I was looking for.. Thanks +1 Apr 6 '15 at 13:12
  • 12
    I had no idea that you could apply a block to an association definition. Zero idea. And I've been working with Rails for 7 years... Nice one. Jul 27 '15 at 19:48
70

In Rails 4, you can specify the scope originally defined in the child object in the association itself. Short: you don't have to know the internals of the MeetingParticipation model within the User model.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :meeting_participations
  has_many :meetings, :through => :meeting_participations
  has_many :visible_participations, -> { visible }, :class_name => 'MeetingParticipation'
  has_many :visible_meetings, :source => :meeting, :through => :visible_participations
end

class Meeting < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :meeting_participations
  has_many :users, :through => :meeting_participations
end

class MeetingParticipation < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :meeting

  scope :hidden, -> { where(:hidden => true) }
  scope :visible, -> { where(:hidden => false) }
end

This would allow you to do: user1.visible_meetings and user2.visible_meetings with different result sets

6
  • 7
    I like this solution, but to get it to work I also need to add :source to the :visible_meetings has_many :visible_meetings, class_name: 'Meeting', through: :visible_participations, source: :meeting Sep 20 '14 at 4:13
  • Does '-> { visible }' need to be changed into a symbol '-> { :visible }' or does the code snippet above work as is? Oct 6 '14 at 3:46
  • 2
    @chaostheory sorry for the late reply, but as is, its not a symbol in this context. Mar 9 '15 at 0:35
  • 2
    Just like @DarrenHicks commented, I had to add the :source, but I was then able to omit the :class_name
    – Raf
    Mar 23 '15 at 2:53
  • This is awesome. Any way to do something similar in Rails 3?
    – steve
    Sep 9 '15 at 18:32
9

The clean, associations way to do it is:

has_many :visible_meetings, -> { merge(MeetingParticipations.visible) },
  :source => :meeting, :through => :meeting_participations

To put it in more generic terms: if you have a chained has_many association you can scope the intermediate (through) association via merging the scope. Probably requires Rails 4+.

Otherwise this would have to be done via creating a (probably unwanted) intermediate scoped association as seen in @Paul Pettengill's answer.

1
  • 3
    Best answer in my opinion Jun 24 '19 at 11:09
7
current_user.meetings.merge(MeetingParticipations.visible)
4

Here's a one liner:

Meeting.joins(:meeting_participations).where(meeting_participation: { hidden: false, user_id: current_user.id })

This is great because you can make a scope out of it, a function out of it, or simply call it anywhere. You can also add any more restrictions you want to the hash.

1
  • best answer by far. with this syntax you can add an association extension as the accepted answer does, or you can put a scope on the entire class and filter associated objects using an argument passed into the scope. furthermore, the join will greatly improve the performance of the result versus any answers leveraging the merge function. Jun 1 '19 at 14:50
2

I know this question was answered a while back but I just encountered a similar issue and was looking around for the best way to handle this. The accepted solution is very simple but I think it would be cleaner by moving the scope of the association from Users to Meeting as should below

class Users < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :meetings, :through => :meeting_participations
  has_many :meeting_participations
end

class Meetings < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :users, :through => :meeting_participations
  has_many :meeting_participations
  scope :hidden, -> { where('meeting_participations.hidden = ?', true) }
  scope :visible, -> { where('meeting_participations.hidden = ?', false) }
end

class MeetingParticipations < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :meeting

  scope :hidden, where(:hidden => true)
  scope :visible, where(:hidden => false)
end

With this, you are able to call current_user.meetings.hidden

By design, the meeting now dictates what makes it hidden/visible.

2
  • This, I like very much. Allowing the scopes to be determined by the target object is the right way to do it. I think I read just today, somewhere (lots of reading, as I am learning rails) that adding methods on the association wasn't a good way to do it. This was related to extending existing classes but not using Metaclass but instead Modules. Would you mind explaining how the scope on MeetingParticipations works to pass through to the parent scope to the child? Mar 14 '20 at 19:16
  • 2
    @frostymarvelous my suggestion of moving the scope in the accepted answer from Users to Meeting would work even if the scope on MeetingParticipations is removed. MeetingParticipations table has a hidden column. My solution was just a reorganization of what I perceive to be a better design. I would personally leave the scopes on MeetingParticipations just in case you need to get hidden/visible, no need for a where clause at that time. Mar 14 '20 at 19:42
-3

You could also do:

current_user.meeting_participations.visible.map(&:meeting)
-4

It would seem to me that it is not sensible to use a scope on Meeting for your purpose. A meeting itself has no visibility, but the participation has. So I would suggest an extension on the association within User:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :meetings, :through => :meeting_participations do
    def visible
      ids = MeetingParticipation.
        select(:meeting_id).
        where(:user_id => proxy_owner.id, :visible => true).
        map{|p| p.meeting_id}
      proxy_target.where("id IN (?)", ids)
    end
  end
  ...
end

I hope, this helps.

0

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