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Using AWS I am quite comfortable with the following scenario:

  • Set up S3 bucket example.com as a static web site.
  • Create a distribution of example.com on CloudFront.
  • Use Route 53 and the certificate manager to allow browsing the S3 bucket content using HTTPS via CloudFront.

However as you know it would still possible to directly access the web site under its alternate URL directly from the S3 bucket using HTTP. I would like to prevent users from directly accessing the S3 bucket URL.

Several tutorials on the web, including the CloudFront documentation, say that I need to create an Origin Access Identity (OAI) and restrict access to the S3 bucket only to the CloudFront distribution using that OAI. However this documentation also says that I can't use OAI with an S3 bucket set up as a static website endpoint.

So that leaves me with a couple of questions that aren't clear to me from the documentation:

  • If I turn off static website access to my S3 bucket example.com, once I connect it to CloudFront using an OAI, will I still be able to access the S3 bucket content via CloudFront over HTTPS? That is, does CloudFront provide "static web site accesss" to my S3 bucket even though I've turned off static website hosting for the bucket?
  • When configuring an S3 bucket for static web site hosting, S3 allows me to set up "routing rules" to redirect foo.html to bar.html for example. If I turn off static web site hosting for my S3 bucket, how do I set up redirects? Does CloudFront provide similar routing rules that I can configure, or is there another way to accomplish this?
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The other ways to restrict access to S3 website endpoint from CloudFront are:

  1. S3 bucket policy to allow access only from CloudFront IP addresses. CloudFront IP addresses : CloudFront IP range

  2. Create S3 policy based on conditions such as Referer and Whitelist Referer header on CloudFront, this only works if you're serving assets from CloudFront, not the main index page as main index page won't have the Referer header in the request.

If you use S3 rest api endpoint instead of s3 website endpoint as an origin, your website will still work on HTTPS (SSL terminates on CloudFront) but there are couple of problem:

  1. Redirection/Routing rules won't work with REST API endpoint.
  2. REST API endpoint doesn't automatically server index page example: if you access abc.com/path --> S3 static endpoint will redirect it to abc.com/path/index.html (Exception for abc.com --> abc.com/index.html which can be done on CloudFront by defining Root document)

For your question of foo.html and bar.html, you need to use Lambda@edge function to change the URI with origin request function.

Lambda@edge examples

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  • 1
    Whitelisting Referer will have negative implications on the cache hit ratio unless each asset is only ever accessed from exactly one referring page, since CloudFront will cache a different copy of each asset for each referring page. This is of course not suitable as an actual security measure since it's trivial to spoof, but is effective at preventing casual access to the bucket directly and may be fine depending on the use case. – Michael - sqlbot Oct 27 '19 at 14:49
  • Whitelisting the CloudFront IP addresses is also comparably insecure, since anyone else can set up a CloudFront distro and access the content. Setting the bucket policy to require the string Amazon CloudFront in the user agent, using the aws:UserAgent condition key works similarly -- no real security and easy to spoof, but may be appropriate in some cases. – Michael - sqlbot Oct 27 '19 at 14:52
  • yes, but these are only the ways with S3 static website endpoint, I would recommend using REST API endpoint where OAI can be uitlized. I think forgot to add note that these are not secure, thanks for pointing them. – James Dean Oct 27 '19 at 17:24
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    @GarretWilson "If you do not configure CloudFront to cache objects based on values in the User-Agent header, CloudFront adds a User-Agent header with the following value before it forwards a request to your origin: User-Agent = Amazon CloudFront CloudFront adds this header regardless of whether the request from the viewer includes a User-Agent header. If the request from the viewer includes a User-Agent header, CloudFront removes it." -- docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonCloudFront/latest/DeveloperGuide/… – Michael - sqlbot Oct 28 '19 at 16:45
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    Note also that you will want to do this by uploading the objects as private, not public, and then, in an Allow policy, allow unauthenticated s3:GetObject when the aws:UserAgent condition is met... rather than making the objects public and then denying access unless the condition is met, because with an explicit "deny ... unless," you won't be able to access the bucket from the S3 console, since the User-Agent obviously won't be set to Amazon CloudFront in that case, and console/CLI/SDK access is also subject to the same bucket policy. – Michael - sqlbot Oct 28 '19 at 16:49
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will I still be able to access the S3 bucket content via CloudFront over HTTPS?

Yes, but cloudfront will access the origin bucket through authenticated S3 API requests instead of generic http requests.

When configuring an S3 bucket for static web site hosting, S3 allows me to set up "routing rules" to redirect foo.html to bar.html for example. If I turn off static web site hosting for my S3 bucket, how do I set up redirects?

I don't know of a way to do it in CloudFront. I continue to host my assets on an s3 website for that reason.

I would like to prevent users from directly accessing the S3 bucket URL.

I was willing to give that up to maintain some of the functionality I wanted from s3 bucket hosting. It's a tradeoff you'll have to decide for yourself which is more important.

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  • Thanks for directly and succinctly answering the questions. I don't like the answer even though it may be true. ;) haha I'm hoping someone else can answer and tell us a way to do redirects on CloudFront, so I'll wait a while before accepting an answer. – Garret Wilson Oct 27 '19 at 0:55
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If I turn off static website access to my S3 bucket example.com, once I connect it to CloudFront using an OAI, will I still be able to access the S3 bucket content via CloudFront over HTTPS? That is, does CloudFront provide "static web site accesss" to my S3 bucket even though I've turned off static website hosting for the bucket?

You can use any bucket for hosting content delivered via Cloudfront, it does not need to be configured as public web hosting. If you have it configured to only allow the OAI to access the bucket, then users will be prevented from accessing content directly.

In cloudformation, this can look like this:

WebsiteContentBucket:
  Type: AWS::S3::Bucket
  DeletionPolicy: Delete
  Properties:
    BucketName: <bucketname here>

WebsiteContentBucketPolicy:
  Type: AWS::S3::BucketPolicy
  Properties:
    Bucket:
      Ref: WebsiteContentBucket
    PolicyDocument:
      Statement:
      - Action:
          - "s3:GetObject"
        Effect: "Allow"
        Resource:
          Fn::Sub: arn:aws:s3:::${WebsiteContentBucket}/*
        Principal:
          AWS:
            Fn::Sub: "arn:aws:iam::cloudfront:user/CloudFront Origin Access Identity ${WebsiteCloudFrontOAI}"

WebsiteCloudFrontOAI:
  Type: AWS::CloudFront::CloudFrontOriginAccessIdentity
  Properties:
    CloudFrontOriginAccessIdentityConfig:
      Comment: your comment here

When configuring an S3 bucket for static web site hosting, S3 allows me to set up "routing rules" to redirect foo.html to bar.html for example. If I turn off static web site hosting for my S3 bucket, how do I set up redirects? Does CloudFront provide similar routing rules that I can configure, or is there another way to accomplish this?

You move the routing to Cloudfront instead of S3. So if you want /foo.html to return bar.html you create another origin in cloudfront. You can have multiple origins, pointing to different buckets, application servers, etc.

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  • "So if you want /foo.html to return bar.html you create another origin in cloudfront. You can have multiple origins, pointing to different buckets, application servers, etc." Maybe you didn't understand this part. This is within the same bucket namespace. This is not redirecting a domain, I want to redirect a single HTML document path within one web site. So if a user browses to https://www.example.com/test/foo.html, they would be directed to https://www.example.com/test/bar.html. How would creating a different origin help that? And what would I configure to make the redirect happen? – Garret Wilson Oct 31 '19 at 13:36
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"Static website hosting" feature of S3 bucket only affects redirect rules (see below). But it does not affect visibility of your website by alternative URL. So, if you are using CloudFront and OAI - you should make S3 bucket private, then it will be accessible only via CloudFront.

If you enable "Static website hosting" in S3 you will be able to:

  • forward "/" path to "/index.html". This is also possible with CloudFront.
  • forward not found pages to "/error.html". This is also possible with CloudFront.
  • have redirect rules. This is possible to achieve with Lambda @Edge in CloudFront.

Conclusion: enabling "Static website hosting" is not required when serving traffic via CloudFront.

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Hidden in the comments to my original question is an absolute gem of an idea by @Michael-sqlbot: use an IAM JSON condition policy element with the aws:UserAgent key to only allow access from CloudFront based upon the CloudFront User-Agent header:

User-Agent = Amazon CloudFront

This turns out to be pretty simple. Here is a basic IAM JSON policy restricting the example.com bucket to access only by CloudFront based upon the User-Agent header:

{
  "Version": "2012-10-17",
  "Statement": [
    {
      "Sid": "PublicReadGetObject",
      "Effect": "Allow",
      "Principal": "*",
      "Action": "s3:GetObject",
      "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::example.com/*",
      "Condition": {
        "StringEquals": {
          "aws:UserAgent": "Amazon CloudFront"
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

Then if a user attempts to browser directly to the S3 bucket website URL, AWS returns an HTTP 403 Forbidden response code. This doesn't provide absolute security, but if the goal is to impede inadvertent direct access by users, and to prevent indexing by search engines, this approach fits the bill nicely.

(I put up a bounty hoping that @Michael-sqlbot would provide a separate answer here on Stack Overflow so that I could reward him, as this was completely his idea. I just researched and put together the actual example policy template.)

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