5

More specifically, how do I tell if the origin of the repo on disk is a fork of some repo? I am thinking that it should be some API call, but I am not sure. Can I rely on "remote.upstream.url"?

3
  • 1
    I suppose that you should have matching commit IDs at the beginning of your local branch(es). Oct 28, 2019 at 21:10
  • do git config --get remote.origin.url Dec 5, 2022 at 20:28
  • This will tell me if the local repo is a clone. It does not tell me if the remote.origin.url is itself a fork.
    – mpersico
    Dec 8, 2022 at 17:14

2 Answers 2

3

You could use the GitHub API for Repositories to get a specific repo

GET /repos/:owner/:repo

(you can use a curl call from command line)

The JSON answer will include a "fork" field: value true or false.


Another approach, using the GitHub CLI gh repo view command:

gh repo view VonC/git-cred --json isFork
{
  "isFork": false
}
3
  • 2
    AHA! I can ask MY repo what is it is a fork of. So :owner/:repo comes from git config --get remote.origin.url, looking for "fork": true and "full_name:" in "parent". Thank you.
    – mpersico
    Oct 29, 2019 at 21:01
  • 1
    @mpersico Exactly. Or, as I mention in stackoverflow.com/a/32991784/6309, git remote get-url origin.
    – VonC
    Oct 30, 2019 at 7:20
  • AHA2! I’ll be updating with this gem today. I try to read the release notes every time my machine gets a new git package but sometimes I miss it.
    – mpersico
    Oct 30, 2019 at 11:56
-3

Yes, do this:

(meta_learning) brandomiranda~/proverbot9001 ❯ git config --get remote.origin.url
git@github.com:brando90/proverbot9001.git
1
  • This will tell me if the local repo is a clone. It does not tell me if the remote.origin.url is itself a fork.
    – mpersico
    Dec 8, 2022 at 17:13

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