0

I'm new to C and I'm attempting to perform a modification to a string that I have (I'm attempting to reverse it), but I'm unsure why the program doesn't run as intended (displays no output).

void reverse(char *rTarget);

int main()
{
    char memes[] = "memes";
    reverse(memes);
    printf("%s", memes);
}

void reverse(char *rTarget)
{
    char swap;
    int length = (int) strlen(rTarget);

    for (int i = 0; i < length / 2; i++)
    {
        swap = rTarget[i];
        rTarget[i] = rTarget[length - i];
        rTarget[length - i] = swap;
    }
}
  • 1
    You can't use a pointer, because the char* rTarget[] expression means "an array of char*". You must pass the char array (it's basically also a pointer) then modify it. It will not be cloned. – CoderCharmander Oct 29 at 13:33
  • 2
    First of all, your algorithm is wrong, you want to reverse the array so you shall iterate until the half of the array and swap with its equivalent in the second part, why do you iterate over the whole array? – Ahmed Salah Oct 29 at 13:36
  • @CoderCharmander Ah okay, didn't clock the char array is basically a pointer on its own. Thanks. – user12039958 Oct 29 at 13:45
  • @AhmedSalah This isn't meant to be a correctly functioning piece of code, it was just a mockup because I wanted to now how I could actually pass and manipulate a string. – user12039958 Oct 29 at 13:46
  • @AnimeCoder It is a bad idea that you changed your code after selecting the best answer. – Vlad from Moscow Oct 29 at 13:57
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For starters this function declaration

void reverse(char *rTarget[]);

is equivalent to

void reverse(char **rTarget);

There is no great sense to declare it such a way.

You should declare the function like

void reverse( char rTarget[] );

and call it like

reverse( memes );

The function definition is also wrong. At least you have to use the loop like

for (int i = 0; i < length / 2; i++)

and these expressions

    swap = *rTarget[i];
    *rTarget[i] = *rTarget[length - i];
    *rTarget[length - i] = swap;

are invalid. They shall be rewritten like

    swap = ( *rTarget )[i];
    ( *rTarget )[i] = ( *rTarget )[length - i -1];
    ( *rTarget )[length - i - 1] = swap;

Also the variable length shall have the type size_t because in general an object of the type int can not accommodate an object of the type size_t and the function strlen have the return type size_t. So you have to substitute this declaration

int length = (int) strlen(*rTarget);

For this declaratiuon

size_t length = strlen(*rTarget);

Pay attention to that according to the conventions for standard C string functions the function should return pointer to the reversed string.

And according to the C Standard the function main without parameters shall be declared like

int main( void )

Here is a demonstration program that shows how the function can be declared and defined

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char * reverse( char *s )
{
    for ( size_t i = 0, n = strlen( s ); i < n / 2; i++ )
    {
        char c = s[i];
        s[i] = s[n-i-1];
        s[n-i-1] = c;
    }

    return s;
}

int main(void) 
{
    char memes[] = "memes";

    puts( reverse( memes ) );

    return 0;
}

The program output is

semem
0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void reverse(char *rTarget);

int main()
{
    char memes[] = "memes";
    reverse(memes);
    printf("%s", memes);
}

void reverse(char *rTarget)
{
    int length = (int) strlen(rTarget);

    for (int i = 0; i < length / 2; i++)
    {
        char swap = rTarget[i];
        rTarget[i] = rTarget[length - i - 1];
        rTarget[length - i - 1] = swap;
    }
}

The expression *rTarget[i] is parsed as *(rTarget + i), not *(rTarget) + i as you may expect. And you do not need to pass char ** here.

0

The problem is here

*rTarget[i] = *rTarget[length - i]
*rTarget[length - i] = swap;

The primary problem seems to be operator precedence. [] has higher precedence than *. You are passing "array of strings" (because pointers can be used as arrays), so when i is 0, on the left side you take the first (and only existing) array at [0], and * references its first character. To this you assign nonsense from the right side: first character of array [length] (which doesn't exist), which is undefined behavior, so what you program does after this is meaningless to speculate about. You need to add parentheses, so that you reference the pointer to array, so you get the actual array, and then use [] on that.

But even if you add parentheses, your algorithm is wrong. On first round, i is 0 so you copy (*rTarget)[length] to start of string. That is the string terminating 0, so you end up with modified string length 0 (first byte is 0). You need -1 for the length.

Fixing your original code, it therefore becomes:

for (int i = 0; i < length / 2; i++)
    {
        swap = (*rTarget)[i];
        (*rTarget)[i] = (*rTarget)[length - i - 1];
        (*rTarget)[length - i - 1] = swap;
    }

Additionally, your function argument is needlessly complex (pointer to pointer to char), straight pointer to modifiable string is enough. Other answers cover that beauty issue.

-1

There are all kinds of dereferencing errors here. Rememember, a string is an array of characters, not an array of character pointers. So this

void reverse(char *rTarget[])

Should be

void reverse(char rTarget[])

And here:

int length = (int) strlen(*rTarget);

You don't have to dereference rTarget, so remove the *. Same in the swap, remove all * that you have there.

Last but not least, there's an off by one error in your swap. Instead of going to length - i, you want to go to length - i - 1, otherwise you're swapping the null terminator to the beginning.

Also your loop should only go to the first half of the array, because otherwise you swap everything twice, resulting in the original string again:

for (int i = 0; i < length/2; i++)

All in all it should look like this:

void reverse(char rTarget[]);

int main()
{
    char memes[] = "memes";
    reverse(memes);
    printf("%s", memes);
}

void reverse(char rTarget[])
{
    char swap;
    int length = (int)strlen(rTarget);

    for (int i = 0; i < length/2; i++)
    {
        swap = rTarget[i];
        rTarget[i] = rTarget[length - i - 1];
        rTarget[length - i - 1] = swap;
    }
}
-2

This should do it:

void reverse(char rTarget[]);

int main()
{
    char memes[] = "memes";
    reverse(memes);
    printf("%s", memes);
}

void reverse(char rTarget[])
{
    char swap;
    int lastindex = (int) strlen(rTarget) - 1;

    for (int i = 0; i < lastindex / 2; i++)
    {
        swap = rTarget[i];
        rTarget[i] = rTarget[lastindex - i];
        rTarget[lastindex - i] = swap;
    }
}

There are a couple of problems in your code. First of all, arrays are always 'passed by reference', so you don't need to pass a pointer to an array. Any changes you make in the array will persist after the function call. Secondly, array subscripts in C start from 0. So the last character (not counting null) in a string of length n is string[n-1] not string[n].

EDIT: As @roottraveller mentioned, since you are swapping characters, you don't need to run till the end of the string. You only need to go till the half of length.

  • 1
    the for loop should run only half of length. – roottraveller Oct 29 at 13:37
  • Ok, would any of the downvoters care to explain what is wrong? – th33lf Oct 29 at 13:44
  • reverse(&memes); - This should have at lease gave a warning when compiled – Ed Heal Oct 29 at 13:50
  • @EdHeal Fixed it (it did work so I kind of missed the warning) – th33lf Oct 30 at 15:43
  • Yes, array subscripts start from 0 ... Therefore: [0] = m, [1] = e, [2] = m, [3] = e, [4] = s. strlen(memes) = 5, hence if you increment from 0 to < 5, you increment up to and including 4... – user12039958 Nov 3 at 13:26
-3

If you are not intended to send multiple strings to reverse function then function argument only require a char pointer represented as "char a[]". While swap character you need to traverse only 50% of the string. The code can be as following.

void reverse(char a[]);

int main()
{
    char memes[] = "memes";
    reverse(memes);
    printf("%s", memes);
}

void reverse(char a[])
{
    char swap;
    int length = (int) strlen(a);
    for(int i = 0, j = (length - 1); i < (length / 2); i++, j--)
    {
        swap = a[i];
        a[i] = a[j];
        a[j] = swap;
    }
}

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