20

I have a dataframe and a dictionary. I need to add a new column to the dataframe and calculate its values based on the dictionary.

Machine learning, adding new feature based on some table:

score = {(1, 45, 1, 1) : 4, (0, 1, 2, 1) : 5}
df = pd.DataFrame(data = {
    'gender' :      [1,  1,  0, 1,  1,  0,  0,  0,  1,  0],
    'age' :         [13, 45, 1, 45, 15, 16, 16, 16, 15, 15],
    'cholesterol' : [1,  2,  2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
    'smoke' :       [0,  0,  1, 1, 7, 8, 3, 4, 4, 2]},
     dtype = np.int64)

print(df, '\n')
df['score'] = 0
df.score = score[(df.gender, df.age, df.cholesterol, df.smoke)]
print(df)

I expect the following output:

   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke    score
0       1   13            1      0      0 
1       1   45            2      0      0
2       0    1            2      1      5
3       1   45            1      1      4
4       1   15            1      7      0
5       0   16            1      8      0
6       0   16            1      3      0
7       0   16            1      4      0
8       1   15            1      4      0
9       0   15            1      2      0
11

Since score is a dictionary (so the keys are unique) we can use MultiIndex alignment

df = df.set_index(['gender', 'age', 'cholesterol', 'smoke'])
df['score'] = pd.Series(score)  # Assign values based on the tuple
df = df.fillna(0, downcast='infer').reset_index()  # Back to columns

   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  score
0       1   13            1      0      0
1       1   45            2      0      0
2       0    1            2      1      5
3       1   45            1      1      4
4       1   15            1      7      0
5       0   16            1      8      0
6       0   16            1      3      0
7       0   16            1      4      0
8       1   15            1      4      0
9       0   15            1      2      0
  • 1
    Nice one of MultiIIndex. Alternative: df['score'] =df.set_index(['gender', 'age', 'cholesterol', 'smoke']).index.map(score).fillna(0).to_numpy(). – Quang Hoang Oct 29 at 16:43
  • 4
    @ALollz, forgive me, I love your answers but I have to speak up when I see so many upvotes on an answer like this. This answer is fine AND clever. But it is not great. There are too many moving parts for no great gain. In the process, you've created a new df via set_index, a new Series via constructor. Though you get a benefit of index alignment when you assign it to df['score']. Lastly, fillna(0, downcast='infer') gets the job done but no one should prefer this lengthy solution with the creation of many pandas objects unnecessarily. – piRSquared Oct 29 at 17:00
  • Again, apologies, you have my upvote as well, I just want to guide folks to simpler answers. – piRSquared Oct 29 at 17:00
  • @piRSquared I went for lunch, and was surprised this got the attention it did when I came back. I agree that it's a bit convoluted all to do something that a simple merge could accomplish. I figured that answer would get posted quickly so I opted for an alternative and for some reason had MultiIndices on my mind. I agree, this probably shouldn't be the accepted answer, so hopefully that doesn't happen. – ALollz Oct 29 at 17:07
  • 1
    Oh I'm with you. I've answered the same many times. I'm just doing my best to serve the community (-: I trust you get my intention. – piRSquared Oct 29 at 17:08
5

Using assign with a list comprehension, getting a tuple of values (each row) from the score dictionary, defaulting to zero if not found.

>>> df.assign(score=[score.get(tuple(row), 0) for row in df.values])
   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  score
0       1   13            1      0      0
1       1   45            2      0      0
2       0    1            2      1      5
3       1   45            1      1      4
4       1   15            1      7      0
5       0   16            1      8      0
6       0   16            1      3      0
7       0   16            1      4      0
8       1   15            1      4      0
9       0   15            1      2      0

Timings

Given the variety of approaches, I though it would be interesting to compare some of the timings.

# Initial dataframe 100k rows (10 rows of identical data replicated 10k times).
df = pd.DataFrame(data = {
    'gender' :      [1,  1,  0, 1,  1,  0,  0,  0,  1,  0] * 10000,
    'age' :         [13, 45, 1, 45, 15, 16, 16, 16, 15, 15] * 10000,
    'cholesterol' : [1,  2,  2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1] * 10000,
    'smoke' :       [0,  0,  1, 1, 7, 8, 3, 4, 4, 2] * 10000},
     dtype = np.int64)

%timeit -n 10 df.assign(score=[score.get(tuple(v), 0) for v in df.values])
# 223 ms ± 9.28 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n 10 
df.assign(score=[score.get(t, 0) for t in zip(*map(df.get, df))])
# 76.8 ms ± 2.8 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n 10
df.assign(score=[score.get(v, 0) for v in df.itertuples(index=False)])
# 113 ms ± 2.58 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%timeit -n 10 df.assign(score=df.apply(lambda x: score.get(tuple(x), 0), axis=1))
# 1.84 s ± 77.3 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n 10
(df
 .set_index(['gender', 'age', 'cholesterol', 'smoke'])
 .assign(score=pd.Series(score))
 .fillna(0, downcast='infer')
 .reset_index()
)
# 138 ms ± 11.5 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n 10
s=pd.Series(score)
s.index.names=['gender','age','cholesterol','smoke']
df.merge(s.to_frame('score').reset_index(),how='left').fillna(0).astype(int)
# 24 ms ± 2.27 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n 10
df.assign(score=pd.Series(zip(df.gender, df.age, df.cholesterol, df.smoke))
                .map(score)
                .fillna(0)
                .astype(int))
# 191 ms ± 7.54 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

%%timeit -n 10
df.assign(score=df[['gender', 'age', 'cholesterol', 'smoke']]
                .apply(tuple, axis=1)
                .map(score)
                .fillna(0))
# 1.95 s ± 134 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
  • My favorite by a bit. However, just to make sure everything stays the intended type when processing through score.get I'd use itertuples or zip(*map(df.get, df))... To reiterate, this is my preferred approach. – piRSquared Oct 29 at 16:49
  • 1
    df.assign(score=[score.get(t, 0) for t in zip(*map(df.get, df))]) – piRSquared Oct 29 at 16:50
  • 1
    Lastly, most of what I'm writing is bluster because the hash of 1.0 is the same as the hash for 1 therefore the tuple look ups should result in the same answer regardless. Apologies @Alexander for so many comments on this but I just want people to upvote this more because... they should (-: – piRSquared Oct 29 at 16:52
  • 1
    As long as you're timing, look at my suggestion. There are occasions when .values is expensive – piRSquared Oct 29 at 17:17
  • 1
    @AndyL. you can even control which columns and in which order: zip(*map(df.get, ['col2', 'col1', 'col5'])) or get tuples of a modification of df: zip(*map(df.eq(1).get, df)) – piRSquared Oct 29 at 17:56
4

You could use map, since score is a dictionary:

df['score'] = df[['gender', 'age', 'cholesterol', 'smoke']].apply(tuple, axis=1).map(score).fillna(0)
print(df)

Output

   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  score
0       1   13            1      0    0.0
1       1   45            2      0    0.0
2       0    1            2      1    5.0
3       1   45            1      1    4.0
4       1   15            1      7    0.0
5       0   16            1      8    0.0
6       0   16            1      3    0.0
7       0   16            1      4    0.0
8       1   15            1      4    0.0
9       0   15            1      2    0.0

As an alternative you could use a list comprehension:

df['score'] = [score.get(t, 0) for t in zip(df.gender, df.age, df.cholesterol, df.smoke)]
print(df)
  • I'd like to extent my question. Really I need to add column base on range of column value. For example, if 40 < age < 50 then then score = 4 etc... Now dictionary maps on exact some value. Same true and for other keys.... – Mikola Oct 29 at 16:44
  • 1
    Add an example of what you really want – Daniel Mesejo Oct 29 at 16:45
  • Simple example: # Here 40 and 50, 10 and 20 are age range for which I should use score = 4(or 5) score = {(1, 40, 50, 1, 1) : 4, (0, 10, 20, 1, 3) : 5} – Mikola Oct 29 at 16:46
  • @Mikola So if gender = 1 and 40 < age < 50 and so on... – Daniel Mesejo Oct 29 at 16:50
  • 1
    @Mikola You should let know every body, although at this point I believe is better if you ask another question. – Daniel Mesejo Oct 29 at 16:56
4

List comprehension and map:

df['score'] = (pd.Series(zip(df.gender, df.age, df.cholesterol, df.smoke))
               .map(score)
               .fillna(0)
               .astype(int)
              )

Output:

   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  score
0       1   13            1      0      0
1       1   45            2      0      0
2       0    1            2      1      5
3       1   45            1      1      4
4       1   15            1      7      0
5       0   16            1      8      0
6       0   16            1      3      0
7       0   16            1      4      0
8       1   15            1      4      0
9       0   15            1      2      0
9       0   15            1      2    0.0
3

reindex

df['socre']=pd.Series(score).reindex(pd.MultiIndex.from_frame(df),fill_value=0).values
df
Out[173]: 
   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  socre
0       1   13            1      0      0
1       1   45            2      0      0
2       0    1            2      1      5
3       1   45            1      1      4
4       1   15            1      7      0
5       0   16            1      8      0
6       0   16            1      3      0
7       0   16            1      4      0
8       1   15            1      4      0
9       0   15            1      2      0

Or merge

s=pd.Series(score)
s.index.names=['gender','age','cholesterol','smoke']
df=df.merge(s.to_frame('score').reset_index(),how='left').fillna(0)
Out[166]: 
   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  score
0       1   13            1      0    0.0
1       1   45            2      0    0.0
2       0    1            2      1    5.0
3       1   45            1      1    4.0
4       1   15            1      7    0.0
5       0   16            1      8    0.0
6       0   16            1      3    0.0
7       0   16            1      4    0.0
8       1   15            1      4    0.0
9       0   15            1      2    0.0
2

May be another way would be using .loc[]:

m=df.set_index(df.columns.tolist())
m.loc[list(score.keys())].assign(
           score=score.values()).reindex(m.index,fill_value=0).reset_index()

   gender  age  cholesterol  smoke  score
0       1   13            1      0      0
1       1   45            2      0      0
2       0    1            2      1      5
3       1   45            1      1      4
4       1   15            1      7      0
5       0   16            1      8      0
6       0   16            1      3      0
7       0   16            1      4      0
8       1   15            1      4      0
9       0   15            1      2      0
2

Simple one line solution, Use get and tuple row-wise,

df['score'] = df.apply(lambda x: score.get(tuple(x), 0), axis=1)

Above solution is assuming there are no columns other than desired ones in order. If not, just use columns

cols = ['gender','age','cholesterol','smoke']
df['score'] = df[cols].apply(lambda x: score.get(tuple(x), 0), axis=1)
  • Use of score.get is good. However, you should prefer a comprehension, in my opinion. See @Alexander's timings. – piRSquared Oct 29 at 17:04
  • Ok @piSquared. Will keep that in mind. – Vishnudev Oct 29 at 17:37

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