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How to express the double variable double summation sequence in Perl 6?

For an example of double variable double summation sequence see this

image

It must be expressed as is, i.e. without mathematically reducing the double summation into a single summation. Thank you.

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The X (cross operator) and the [+] (reduction metaoperator [ ] with additive operator +) make this surprisingly easy:

To represent1 the double summation ∑³x = 1 ∑⁵y = 1 2x + y , you can do the following:

  [+] do for 1..3 X 1..5 -> ($x, $y) { 2 * $x + $y }
#        for 1..3 X 1..5                             # loop cross values
#                        -> ($x, $y)                 # plug into x/y
#                                    { 2 * $x + $y } # calculate each iteration
#     do                                             # collect loop return vals 
# [+]                                                # sum them all

If you wanted to create a sub for this, you could write it as the following2

sub ΣΣ (
    Int $aₒ, Int $aₙ,     # to / from for the outer
    Int $bₒ, Int $bₙ,     # to / from for the inner
    &f where .arity = 2   # 'where' clause guarantees only two params
) {
  [+] do for $aₒ..$aₙ X $bₒ..$bₙ -> ($a, $b) { &f(a,b) }
}

say ΣΣ 1,3, 1,5, { 2 * $^x + $^y }

Or even simplify things more to

sub ΣΣ (
    Iterable \a,            # outer values
    Iterable \b,            # inner values
    &f where .arity = 2) {  # ensure only two parameters
  [+] do f(|$_) for a X b
}

# All of the following are equivalent
say ΣΣ 1..3, 1..5, -> $x, $y { 2 * $x  + $y  }; # Anonymous block
say ΣΣ 1..3, 1..5,           { 2 * $^x + $^y }; # Alphabetic args
say ΣΣ 1..3, 1..5,             2 *  *  +  *   ; # Overkill, but Whatever ;-) 

Note that by typing it, we can ensure ranges are passed, but by typing it as Iterable rather than Range we can allow more interesting summation sequences, like, say, ΣΣ (1..∞).grep(*.is-prime)[^99], 1..10, { … } that would let us use sequence of the first 100 primes.

In fact, if we really wanted to, we could go overboard, and allow for an arbitrary depth summation operator, which is made easiest by moving the function to the left:

sub ΣΣ (
    &function, 
    **@ranges where                # slurp in the ranges
        .all   ~~ Iterable &&      # make sure they're Iterables 
        .elems == &function.arity  # one per argument in the function
) {
  [+] do function(|$_) for [X] @ranges;
};

Just like [+] sums up all the values of our f() function, [X] calculates the cross iteratively, e.g., [X] 0..1, 3..4, 5..6 first does 0..1 X 3..4 or (0,3),(0,4),(1,3),(1,4), and then does (0,3),(0,4),(1,3),(1,4) X 5..6, or (0,3,5),(0,4,5),(1,3,5),(1,4,5),(0,3,6),(0,4,6),(1,3,6),(1,4,6).


1. Sorry, SO doesn't let me do LaTeX, but you should get the idea. 2. Yes, I know that's a subscript letter O not a zero, subscript numbers aren't valid identifiers normally, but you can use Slang::Subscripts to enable them.

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