7

I want to differentiate between these two json inputs in an action in Asp.Net Core:

{
  "field1": null,
  "field2": null
}

and

{
  "field1": null,
}

I have an ordinary class like this in C#:

public class MyData
{
   public string Field1 { get; set;}
   public string Field2 { get; set;}
}

I want to run a partial update of an object that can accept null as the value, but when the field will not be in the input it means I don't want to update this field at all (something else from setting it to null).

  • Track if the setter got called? – Rand Random Oct 31 '19 at 13:52
  • Yes, that's probably a good idea, then I'll have to have some more internal fields to check if it was set for each field. A bit cumbersome, but doable, perhaps some better way exists? – Ilya Chernomordik Oct 31 '19 at 13:53
  • Could do one dictionary instead of seperate fields, but thats all I can think of. Good luck :) – Rand Random Oct 31 '19 at 13:54
  • 1
    Rather than binding to a static class, I think you should be able to take a [FromBody] JObject parameter and query it for specific values. – StriplingWarrior Oct 31 '19 at 15:12
  • Sounds good, I shall try – Ilya Chernomordik Oct 31 '19 at 15:14
2

This is what I ended up doing, as all other options seem to be too complicated (e.g. jsonpatch, model binding) or would not give the flexibility I want.

This solution means there is a bit of a boilerplate to write for each property, but not too much:

public class UpdateRequest : PatchRequest
{
    [MaxLength(80)]
    [NotNullOrWhiteSpaceIfSet]
    public string Name
    {
       get => _name;
       set { _name = value; SetHasProperty(nameof(Name)); }
    }  
}

public abstract class PatchRequest
{
    private readonly HashSet<string> _properties = new HashSet<string>();

    public bool HasProperty(string propertyName) => _properties.Contains(propertyName);

    protected void SetHasProperty(string propertyName) => _properties.Add(propertyName);
}

The value can then be read like this:

if (request.HasProperty(nameof(request.Name)) { /* do something with request.Name */ }

and this is how it can be validated with a custom attribute:

var patchRequest = (PatchRequest) validationContext.ObjectInstance;
if (patchRequest.HasProperty(validationContext.MemberName) {/* do validation*/}
| improve this answer | |
2

Just to add another 2 cents, we went the similar way to the Ilya's answer, except that we're not calling SetHasProperty from setter, but overriding DefaultContractResolver:

public class PatchRequestContractResolver : DefaultContractResolver
{
    protected override JsonProperty CreateProperty(MemberInfo member, MemberSerialization memberSerialization)
    {
        var prop = base.CreateProperty(member, memberSerialization);

        prop.SetIsSpecified += (o, o1) =>
        {
            if (o is PatchRequest patchRequest)
            {
                patchRequest.SetHasProperty(prop.PropertyName);
            }
        };

        return prop;
    }
}

And then register this resolver in Startup:

services
    .AddControllers()
    .AddNewtonsoftJson(settings =>
        settings.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver = new PatchRequestContractResolver());```

Note, that we are still using JSON.Net and not the System.Text.Json (which is default for .Net 3+) for deserializing. As of now there's no way to do things similar to DefaultContractResolver with System.Text.Json

| improve this answer | |
  • Nice trick, I would think there is a way to do this not at the Json serialization level, but some model binding level in MVC. You can perhaps override something there to make it independent of Json serialization – Ilya Chernomordik Mar 23 at 10:16
  • I actually tried to integrate on ModelBinding level initially, but had no success (haven't found a way to override only small part of the ModelBinding logic, what I tried required copy&pasting default model binder's code which isn't good) – Shaddix Mar 23 at 16:17
  • yes, that sounds like an overkill. .Net core is a great platform, but model binding leaves much to be desired unfortunately in terms of extensibility – Ilya Chernomordik Mar 23 at 19:28
0

A low key will be like this:

public class MyData
{
  public string Field1 { get; set; }
  public string Field2 { get; set; }

  // this can be extension method also.
  public bool HasProperty(string propertyName)
  {
    return GetType().GetProperty(propertyName) != null;
  }
}

In main:

  string json = "{  \"field1\": null,  \"field2\": null }";
  MyData jsonObject = null;

  jsonObject = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<MyData>(json);

  MyData source= null; // this will contain values  

  if (jsonObject.HasProperty("Field1"))
    source.Field1 = jsonObject.Field1;

Reference: Check if a property exist in a class

| improve this answer | |
0

Intro: Asp.net core takes your request body and then deserializes to a object of Type MyData, and then it calls the method in your controller by passing the object as parameter. From the object myData you can not know if the field2 was null or not passed. Both ways the property will have a null value. The information you are trying to find is lost at deserialization.

Solution: To find out this, you need to read the request body, and check the request body if the field was passed or not. In asp.net core, there is a bit of complexity is reading the request body once it is read (by the asp.net core framework for creating the object of MyData). We need to rewind the request stream, and then read it. The code for it is below.

[HttpPost]
public void Post([FromBody] MyData myData)
{
    HttpContext.Request.Body.Seek(0, System.IO.SeekOrigin.Begin);
    System.IO.StreamReader sr = new System.IO.StreamReader(HttpContext.Request.Body);
    var requestBody = sr.ReadToEnd();
    //Now check the requestBody if the field was passed using JSON parsing or string manipulation
    Console.WriteLine(requestBody);
}

Warning: Though this will work. What you are trying do will reduce the readability and make it difficult for other developers. Differentiating if a field value is null or was not present in the request body is not a common practice.

| improve this answer | |

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