3

I am trying to make a reactive @WebFilter that executes stuff before and after the actual server exchange (i. e. the controller code handling the request):

public static class Foobar implements WebFilter {

    @Override
    public Mono<Void> filter(ServerWebExchange exchange, WebFilterChain chain) {
        return Mono.empty()
                .doOnEach(s -> /* BEFORE */))
                .then(chain.filter(exchange) /* CONTROLLER */)
                .and(Mono.empty().doOnEach(s -> /* AFTER */))
                .and(Mono.empty().doFinally(s -> /* FINALLY */));
    }
}

Everything works as expected for simple GET requests that return a Mono:

@RestController
@RequestMapping
public static class Foo {

    @GetMapping
    @PostMapping(value = "foo")
    public Mono<String> foo(ServerWebExchange exchange) {
        return Mono.just("FOOBAR").map(e -> "OK");
    }
}

But something really unexpected happens when the controller receives a parameter annotated as @RequestBody. Say, for example a POST request that takes a Mono<String> from the client:

@RestController
@RequestMapping
public static class Bar {

    @PostMapping(value = "bar")
    public Mono<String> bar(ServerWebExchange exchange, @RequestBody Mono<String> text) {
        return text.map(s -> "OK");
    }
}

In this case, all steps in my filter are executed before the controller gets to complete the request. This means that the web exchange is committed independently of the filter and therefore I cannot do anything right after the response is sent back to the client.

So I'm wondering:

  • Is this some kind of Spring bug?
  • Am I doing something wrong?
  • Or is this simply the expected behavior?

I've created a small Gist containing a test case that reproduces the problem:


Edit after Brian's comment:

I still think this might be a bug because Mono.then doesn't seem to have any effect at all:

        @Override
        public Mono<Void> filter(ServerWebExchange exchange, WebFilterChain chain) {
            return chain.filter(exchange)
                .doOnSubscribe(s -> logger.info("onSubscribe response committed:" +
                        exchange.getResponse().isCommitted()))
                .then().doOnEach(s -> logger.info("then doOnEach response committed:" +
                        exchange.getResponse().isCommitted()))
                .doFinally(s -> logger.info("doFinally response committed:" +
                        exchange.getResponse().isCommitted()));
        }

Additionally, if I put stuff in doOnEach is not executed either:

        @Override
        public Mono<Void> filter(ServerWebExchange exchange, WebFilterChain chain) {
            return chain.filter(exchange)
                    .doOnSubscribe(s -> logger.info("FILTER-BEFORE-CHAIN/commited=" +
                        response.isCommitted()))
                    .doOnEach(s -> logger.info("FILTER-AFTER-CHAIN/commited=" +
                        response.isCommitted()))
                    .doFinally(s -> logger.info("FILTER-FINALLY/commited=" +
                        response.isCommitted()));
        }
1

I don't think this is a bug in Spring (nor in Reactor in this case), but rather a wrong choice of operators to achieve what you're trying to do.

  • Mono.doOnEach is executed for each signal (next element, completion, error, cancel); this will be executed several times per request in our case.
  • Mono.and joins the termination signals - so it waits for both Mono to be done and then completes. But both Monos are not executed sequentially, they're subscribed at the same time. Mono.just completes right away, independently of what happens with the filter chain.

In your case, you don't need to have something more complex than adding one operator when the processing starts (doOnSubscribe happens when the mapping has been done and we're starting to execute the handler) and another one when we're done (doFinally happens when it's done, with completion, error or cancellation).

    @Component
    public class MyFilter implements WebFilter {

        Logger logger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(getClass());

        @Override
        public Mono<Void> filter(ServerWebExchange exchange, WebFilterChain chain) {
            return chain.filter(exchange)
                .doOnSubscribe(s -> logger.info("onSubscribe response committed:" +
                        exchange.getResponse().isCommitted()))
                .doFinally(s -> logger.info("doFinally response committed:" + 
                        exchange.getResponse().isCommitted()));
        }
    }

Note that this approach works as long as you're not performing blocking operations in the DoOnXYZ methods, as they're side effects methods. Doing so will create significant performance problems in your application (and reactor might even reject that operation with an exception). So logging, adding an element to a map are fine - but publishing something to an event queue, for example, is not. In this case, you should use instead chain operations with Mono.then().

Edit

I don't think there is a bug with Mono.then() - doOnEach only works with signals sent downstream (next, error, complete). In this case, you should only get the complete signal. If you'd like to get the context in all cases, you can take a look at Mono.deferWithContext.

  • Thanks for your suggestion. This approach has the next disadvantages, though: 1. If the Mono was subscribed a second time, then wouldn't the before callback be executed twice? 2. doOnSubscribe and doFinally don't allow the callbacks access the reactive context, which was the whole reason for that specific choice of operators. – Guillermo Calvo Nov 5 '19 at 2:49
  • 1
    1. you can't subscribe twice to an exchange in WebFlux, so this case should never happen. 2. that wasn't clear from your question. You could use a single doOnEach and react on the signal type. – Brian Clozel Nov 5 '19 at 8:09
  • 1. It's good to know that WebFlux exchanges cannot be subscribed more than once, that makes things simpler :) Thanks for pointing that out. 2. My bad, I omitted the context part, because I wanted to simplify things as much as possible. Problem with doOnEach is that it never gets executed. I updated my gist just in case you want to check it out. – Guillermo Calvo Nov 12 '19 at 8:01

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