44

ExecuteReader: Connection property has not been initialized.

my coding is

protected void Button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

       SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=Si-6\\SQLSERVER2005;Initial Catalog=rags;Integrated Security=SSPI");

    SqlDataReader rdr = null;

    try
    {
        // 2. Open the connection
        conn.Open();

        // 3. Pass the connection to a command object
        //SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("select * from Customers", conn);
        SqlCommand cmd=new SqlCommand ("insert into time(project,iteration)
                  values('"+this .name1 .SelectedValue +"','"+this .iteration .SelectedValue +"')");

        //
        // 4. Use the connection
        //

        // get query results
        rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader();

        // print the CustomerID of each record
        while (rdr.Read())
        {
            Console.WriteLine(rdr[0]);
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        // close the reader
        if (rdr != null)
        {
            rdr.Close();
        }

        // 5. Close the connection
        if (conn != null)
        {
            conn.Close();
        }
    }
  }
  }

    }
2
  • Since SqlConnection,SqlCommand and SqlReader objects are using unmanaged resources and thus they are disposable objects it's a good practice to dispose them when their task is done. To make the code more readable you can use the using directive to do it. May 3, 2011 at 6:56
  • These answers is right.you must accept.you must initialize sqlcommand connection property with your created connection.
    – Saleh
    May 3, 2011 at 6:57

7 Answers 7

70

use this and pass connection object :

 SqlCommand cmd=new SqlCommand ("insert into time(project,iteration)values('"+this .name1 .SelectedValue +"','"+this .iteration .SelectedValue +"')",conn);
1
  • hi thanks for the info..i had another clarification too how to get the html controls in c#
    – jeni
    May 3, 2011 at 7:05
22

After SqlCommand cmd=new SqlCommand ("insert into time(project,iteration)values('.... Add

cmd.Connection = conn;

Hope this help

6

you have to assign connection to your command object, like..

SqlCommand cmd=new SqlCommand ("insert into time(project,iteration)values('"+this .name1 .SelectedValue +"','"+this .iteration .SelectedValue +"')");
cmd.Connection = conn; 
0
3

All of the answers is true.This is another way. And I like this One

SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand()

you must notice that strings concat have a sql injection problem. Use the Parameters http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.sqlclient.sqlcommand.parameters.aspx

3

You can also write this:

SqlCommand cmd=new SqlCommand ("insert into time(project,iteration) values (@project, @iteration)", conn);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@project",name1.SelectedValue);
cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@iteration",iteration.SelectedValue);
2

As mentioned you should assign the connection and you should preferably also use sql parameters instead, so your command assignment would read:

    // 3. Pass the connection to a command object
    SqlCommand cmd=new SqlCommand ("insert into time(project,iteration) values (@project, @iteration)", conn); // ", conn)" added
    cmd.Parameters.Add("project", System.Data.SqlDbType.NVarChar).Value = this.name1.SelectedValue;
    cmd.Parameters.Add("iteration", System.Data.SqlDbType.NVarChar).Value = this.name1.SelectedValue;

    //
    // 4. Use the connection
    //

By using parameters you avoid SQL injection and other problematic typos (project names like "myproject's" is an example).

0

I like to place all my sql connections in using statements. I think they look cleaner, and they clean up after themselves when your done with them. I also recommend parameterizing every query, not only is it much safer but it is easier to maintain if you need to come back and make changes.

// create/open connection
using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=Si-6\\SQLSERVER2005;Initial Catalog=rags;Integrated Security=SSPI")
{
    try
    {
        conn.Open();

        // initialize command
        using (SqlCommand cmd = conn.CreateCommand())
        {

            // generate query with parameters
            with cmd
            {
                .CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                .CommandText = "insert into time(project,iteration) values(@name, @iteration)";
                .Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@name", this.name1.SelectedValue));
                .Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@iteration", this.iteration.SelectedValue));
                .ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        //throw;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (conn != null && conn.State == ConnectionState.Open)
        {
            conn.Close;
        }
    }
}
2
  • What is "oCn" and why is there a "with" or what is it doing? Feb 21, 2019 at 9:57
  • 1
    The "with" is me being lazy and not typing out cmd. for the next five commands and the oCn was a typo... It was the naming convention for connection objects at my work. Thanks.
    – Wayne
    Feb 26, 2019 at 23:36

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