25

I'd expect

echo foo | tee /proc/self/fd/{3..6} 3>&1

to fail with errors like /proc/self/fd/4: No such file or directory etc., but to my surprise, it outputs

foo
foo
foo
foo
foo

It's like 3>&1 causes all following descriptors to be redirected to stdout, except it doesn't work if I change 3 to something else, like

$ echo foo | tee /proc/self/fd/{3..6} 4>&1
tee: /proc/self/fd/3: No such file or directory
tee: /proc/self/fd/5: No such file or directory
tee: /proc/self/fd/6: No such file or directory
foo
foo
$ echo foo | tee /proc/self/fd/{4..6} 4>&1
tee: /proc/self/fd/5: No such file or directory
tee: /proc/self/fd/6: No such file or directory
foo
foo

Is there an explanation for this behavior?

27

strace shows this sequence of system calls:

$ strace -o strace.log tee /proc/self/fd/{3..6} 3>&1
...
$ cat strace.log
...
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/proc/self/fd/3", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 4
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/proc/self/fd/4", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 5
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/proc/self/fd/5", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 6
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/proc/self/fd/6", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 7
...

The first line opens /proc/self/fd/3 and assigns it the next available fd number, 4. /proc/self/fd/3 is a special path. Opening it has an effect similar to duping fd 3: fd 4 points to the same place as fd 3, the tty.

The same thing happens for each successive openat() call. When the dust settles fds 4, 5, 6, and 7 are all duplicates of fd 3.

  • 1 → tty
  • 3 → tty
  • 4 → tty
  • 5 → tty
  • 6 → tty
  • 7 → tty

Note that the 3>&1 redirection isn't important. What's important is that we're asking tee to open /proc/self/fd/N where N is already in use. We should get the same result if we get rid of 3>&1 and have tee start at /proc/self/fd/2 instead. Let's see:

$ echo foo | tee /proc/self/fd/{2..6}
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo

Confirmed! Same result.

We can also repeat the same fd number over and over. We get the same result when we hit fd 6. By the time it reaches the last one it has opened enough descriptors to make the jump to 6 possible.

$ echo foo | tee /proc/self/fd/{2,2,2,2,6}
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
foo
  • 2
    Took a while to follow the explanation, but I think I got it: every time a process opens a file, that file gets assigned the next available file descriptor. /proc/self/fd contains a special file for every file descriptor of the process, so opening a file causes a new one to appear there (even if the file being opened is itself in that directory). Therefore opening a file in /proc/self/fd makes a functional duplicate of that file in the same directory, with the next available descriptor number. – Arkku Nov 2 at 12:39
  • 1
    @F.Hauri what are you talking about? – oguz ismail Nov 8 at 20:19
  • 1
    It's not a bug. tee's not doing anything wrong opening each command-line argument in sequence. It's exactly what it should do. Testing for existence first is an anti-pattern. It would open the door for a TOCTOU race condition. – John Kugelman supports Monica 2 days ago
0

A tee bug?

John Kugelman's answer is fine, but as problem is complex, I will go a little further:

bash -c 'exec 2> >(exec sed -ue "s/^/StdErr: /");
    exec 1> >(exec sed -ue "s/^/StdOut: /");
    tee /dev/fd/{2..6} <<<foo'
StdErr: foo
StdOut: foo
StdErr: foo
StdErr: foo
StdErr: foo
StdErr: foo

Showing input (foo) muliplied 5x on*STDERR* AND 1x on STDOUT. So all /dev/fd/{3..6} are binded to /dev/fd/2.

strace -o >(grep dev/fd) -e openat tee /dev/fd/{2..6} <<<foo 4>/dev/null
foo
foo
foo
foo
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/fd/2", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 3
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/fd/3", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 5
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/fd/4", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 6
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/fd/5", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 7
openat(AT_FDCWD, "/dev/fd/6", O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC, 0666) = 8

So tee produce 4x input on tty instead of 5 (2..6 + STDOUT = 6, - 1x /dev/null => 5 attended foo):

  1. Access /dev/fd/2, openning file descriptor 3... and so create /dev/fd/3, then
  2. Access /dev/fd/3, wich exist now, from previous operation, openning file descriptor 5 (because /dev/fd/4 is binded to /dev/null by command line... and so create /dev/fd/5, then
  3. Access /dev/fd/4 (binded to /dev/null by command line) and create /dev/fd/6, then
  4. Access /dev/fd/5, wich exist now, (binded to 3, binded to 2...), then
  5. Access /dev/fd/6, wich exist now, but binded to /dev/fd/4 wich is binded to /dev/null.

Expected output could be:

tee /dev/fd/{2..6} <<<foo
foo
tee: /dev/fd/3: No such file or directory
tee: /dev/fd/4: No such file or directory
tee: /dev/fd/5: No such file or directory
tee: /dev/fd/6: No such file or directory
foo

With ouptut 1 time on STDERR and 1 time on STDOUT, and 4 error lines.

So tee don't check existence of targets before begin. But is this a bug!?

As openining a file in write mode could be ok even if file don't exist (creating new file).

Reading Time-of-check Time-of-use (TOCTOU) Race Condition pointed by John Kugelman's comment help understanding why doing pre-check is a wrong good idea.

So if a bug, I think refering /dev/fd/ directly by tee is THE bug here (on command line).... Not a tee bug, just a buggy user ;-)

  • @oguzismail Accessing /dev/fd could generate error. tee be openning his own fd, don't report error. There is the bug: Asking tee to populate /dev/fd/ is a bug. More expliciteky: Sample in SO request is the bug. – F. Hauri yesterday
  • I wouldn't call that a bug, it might be an anti-pattern, or generally a bad practice though. Still, you could've said that in a comment as well, this answer doesn't even make sense, much less give additional information – oguz ismail yesterday
  • It's the user's fault for passing in weird file names. Passing /proc/self is telling a program to re-open its own internal file descriptors. It's not telling tee to open the shell's file descriptors, it's telling it tee to open tee's fds. It's not surprising that it has bizarre behavior! Bad user. – John Kugelman supports Monica yesterday
  • @JohnKugelmansupportsMonica Do you know any other way to pipe a command's output to multiple programs on a shell that doesn't support process substitution, without using temporary files? I often use cmd | { ( trap '' PIPE; tee /proc/self/fd/3 | cmd1 >&4; ) 3>&1 | cmd2 >&4; } 4>&1 – oguz ismail yesterday
  • 1
    tee /proc/self/fd/N seems fine as long as you already have fd N open. I'd say the lesson we've learned from your question is not to expect a sensible error message if you forgot to open fd N, that's all. – John Kugelman supports Monica yesterday

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