3

It seems a common pattern to consume a queue with a pool of processes, i.e.

Pool(2).map(f, xs)

but where the body of f may append to the items being mapped over, e.g.

from multiprocessing import Pool

xs = [0]

def f(n):
    global xs
    if n < 10:
        xs.append(n + 1)
    return n

Pool(2).map(f, xs)

Expecting to return [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

I realize it's possible to build this "manually" with the primitives provided by mt, but it seems like a common enough pattern that there must be a common solution. Do you know of one?

  • Thanks — it can't be iterated over, though, and I that I realize I can use it to do something manual [1], but it seems so darn complicated for such a simple and common task. 1: testdriven.io/blog/… – Andrey Fedorov Nov 3 '19 at 1:44
  • 3
    Each process runs in its own memory-space, so you can't share access to a global variable like xs. See Sharing state between processes in the documentation. – martineau Nov 3 '19 at 1:47
0

Based on @martineau's suggestion, your code could be updated to:

import multiprocessing as mp


def f(n, xs, xn):
    if n < 10:
        xn.append(n)
        xs.append(n + 1)
        xn.append(n)
        xs.append(n + 2)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    with mp.Manager() as manager:
        xs = manager.list()
        xn = manager.list()
        with mp.Pool(processes=2) as pool:
            pool.starmap(f, [(n, xs, xn) for n in range(20)])
        print(xn)
        print(xs)

This prints

[3, 0, 3, 0, 4, 1, 4, 1, 5, 2, 5, 2, 6, 6, 7, 9, 7, 9, 8, 8]
[4, 1, 5, 2, 5, 2, 6, 3, 6, 3, 7, 4, 7, 8, 8, 10, 9, 11, 9, 10]

for which you see you have no guarantee the order in which n values are produced gets preserved.

EDIT:

import multiprocessing as mp


def f(n):
    thresh = 10
    if max(xs) <= thresh and n < thresh:
        xs.append(n + 1)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    with mp.Manager() as manager:
        xs = manager.list([0])
        with mp.Pool(processes=2) as pool:
            pool.map(f, range(20))
        print(sorted(xs))

This one prints

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the effort, but that doesn't quite do what I want. If it did, then changing the < 10 to < 1000 should result in about 100x the output. – Andrey Fedorov Nov 3 '19 at 3:55
  • @AndreyFedorov Have you modified the value inside the range function? – Patol75 Nov 3 '19 at 4:05
  • I modified my question to simplify the example and add an output for an input of xs = [0] -- does that make more sense? – Andrey Fedorov Nov 3 '19 at 13:59
  • I have updated my answer. Hopefully, it matches better what you expect. Note that you still need to vary both the condition on n and the value you give in range. The condition on max(xs) is to avoid any higher number being incorporated because of an out-of-order execution. – Patol75 Nov 4 '19 at 1:24
  • Sorry, no -- I would expect this output if instead of passing in range(20), you passed in [0], since the function f would then call xs.append(1), which the map function would process and call xs.append(2), etc. I'll add the best answer I have w.r.t. code that does something like this, but I'm still at a loss why this isn't something that can be done using built-in's. – Andrey Fedorov Nov 4 '19 at 1:26
0

You can create a class that does it from primitives like:

from multiprocessing import JoinableQueue, Process


class PoolQueue(object):
    def __init__(self, n):
        self.num_procs = n

    def map(self, f, args):
        payloads = JoinableQueue()
        procs = []

        def add_task(arg):
            payloads.put(arg)

        def process_task():
            while True:
                pl = payloads.get()
                f(pl, add_task)
                payloads.task_done()

        for arg in args:
            add_task(arg)

        procs = [Process(target=process_task) for _ in range(self.num_procs)]
        for p in procs:
            p.start()

        payloads.join()
        for p in procs:
            p.kill()

To test it, run —

from time import sleep
from random import random


def pause():
    sleep(random() / 100)


def process(payload, add_task):
    print(payload)
    pause()
    if payload:
        add_task(payload[:-1])
    return payload


if __name__ == '__main__':
    for x in range(1):
        PoolQueue(2).map(
            process,
            [
                'abcdefghij',
                '0123456789',
                '!@#$%^&*()',
            ],
        )

One problem here is that it deadlocks the queue grows >32767 tasks. The gevent.queue.JoinableQueue handles this better, but that's outside the scope of this question.

| improve this answer | |

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