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I have two processes that communicate with message queues. Each process is its own individual file. The sender appears to successfully send a message into the message queue. Unfortunately, the receiving process blocks and does not observe the messages sent through the posix message queue.

Side Note: I successfully implemented this with strings (sprintf to construct the message in the sender while using sscanf to parse the received message). So I can confirm that the MQ setup is correct.

With that said, I followed this post to change my string message queue implementation and adapt to structs.

Here is the struct and some info Id like to pass through the message queue.

typedef struct msg_buffer{
    long mtype;                
    struct msg_info{
        char* shm_name;
        size_t shm_size;
        char* path;
    }msg_info;
}msg_buffer;

In both processes the message queue is opened.

struct mq_attr attr;
attr.mq_flags = 0;
attr.mq_maxmsg = MQ_MAX_MSG;  // 10
attr.mq_msgsize = BUFSIZE;    // 1200
attr.mq_curmsgs = 0;

// sender and receiver both open mq like below
mq = mq_open(MQ_NAME, O_RDWR | O_CREAT, 0666, &attr);

This is how the sender creates a struct, and sends it through the MQ.

ssize_t handle_with_cache(gfcontext_t *ctx, const char *path, void* arg){
    // Note: char* path sent looks like "/to/some/path.txt";
    //       char* shm_name_buffer[20] = "shm_name_00";

    char* path_copy = malloc(strlen(path) + 1);
    char* shm_name_copy = malloc(strlen(shm_name_buffer) + 1);
    // TODO: fix memory leaks by these char* being copied
    strcpy(path_copy, path);
    strcpy(shm_name_copy, shm_name_buffer);

    struct msg_buffer message = {2, { path_copy, segment_size, shm_name_copy} };

    if(mq_send(mq,(const char*) &message, sizeof(struct msg_info), 0) < 0){
        fprintf(stderr, "Error mq_send: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
    }

    fprintf(stdout, "Send message length is %ld.\n", sizeof(message));
    fprintf(stdout, "path:%s\n", message.msg_info.path);
    fprintf(stdout, "shm_name:%s\n", message.msg_info.shm_name);
    fprintf(stdout, "shm_size:%ld\n", message.msg_info.shm_size);

    mq_getattr(mq, &setAttr);
    fprintf(stdout, "Msgs In Queue: %lu\n", setAttr.mq_curmsgs);
    fprintf(stdout, "Msg Size: %lu\n", setAttr.mq_msgsize);

    return bytes_transferred;
}

This is the receiver, it will listen and wait for a message on the queue and attempt to parse the info:

void *threadCacheProcess(void *thread_id){
    int recMessageSize;
    msg_buffer message;

    while(1){
        // recv message sent from proxy and parse
        recMessageSize = mq_receive(mq, (char *) &message, sizeof(struct msg_info), NULL);

        // block until we get valid message
        if(recMessageSize != -1){
            fprintf(stdout, "Success!\n");
            fprintf(stdout, "T%d Name:%s\n",id, message.msg_info.shm_name);
            fprintf(stdout, "T%d Size:%lu\n",id, message.msg_info.shm_size);
            fprintf(stdout, "T%d path:%s\n",id, message.msg_info.path);
        }
    }
}

Console Outputs:

Sender Console:

path:/test/path/to/file.txt
shm_name:/shm_name_0
shm_size:8192
Msgs In Queue: 1
Msg Size: 1219

Receiver Console:

Thread Running...   // No "Success or print message" that was expected. Why?

EDIT: Ive updated the code so that if follows Beej's guide with the nested example. Unfortunately, the receiving issue still persists.

  • 1
    typedef struct mq_data_struct ... and then you send a mq_info_struct message;? Please provide a complete example. Note that sending a pointer to another process does not send what the pointer points to... – Andrew Henle Nov 3 at 2:55
  • @AndrewHenle I corrected that. Theyre meant to be the same structs. I am looking at Beej's guide (beej.us/guide/bgipc/html/multi/mq.html) for message queues (though this is in sysv). It says to send structs that is embedded in another. I unfortunately cannot get it to work with my code. Any suggestions? – Potion Nov 3 at 3:27
  • Ive updated to code to hopefully be more complete. – Potion Nov 3 at 4:16
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Take a look at the definition of your message buffer. You define the contents of your message (msg_info) to contain two pointers, shm_name and path. Those pointers point to memory in the sender process space, and are not part of the receiver address space.

typedef struct msg_buffer{
    long mtype;                
    struct msg_info{
        char* shm_name;
        size_t shm_size;
        char* path;
    }msg_info;
}msg_buffer;

My suggestion would be to read about Sun-RPC and XDR - you need to serialize the data in the sender and de-serialize the data in the receiver. Read about data serialization or marshalling.

How to fix? Decide the maximum space for your shm_name and path, and redefine your message to hold those.

#define MAX_SHM_NAME (32) //pick appropriate values...
#define MAX_PATH (128)
typedef struct msg_buffer{
    long mtype;                
    struct msg_info{
        size_t shm_size;
        char shm_name[MAX_SHM_NAME];
        char path[MAX_PATH];
    }msg_info;
}msg_buffer;

Then copy the shm_name and path values in the message serialization function,

ssize_t handle_with_cache(gfcontext_t *ctx, const char *path, void* arg){
// Note: char* path sent looks like "/to/some/path.txt";
//       char* shm_name_buffer[20] = "shm_name_00";

/* why malloc? malloc allocs memory in local process address space, the other process cannot see it...
char* path_copy = malloc(strlen(path) + 1);
char* shm_name_copy = malloc(strlen(shm_name_buffer) + 1);
// TODO: fix memory leaks by these char* being copied
strcpy(path_copy, path);
strcpy(shm_name_copy, shm_name_buffer);
*/

struct msg_buffer message;
message.mtype = 2;
message.msg_info.thing = segment_size;
//you could omit the null-terminators, since you have defined max length
strncpy(message.msg_info.shm_name, shm_name_buffer, MAX_SHM_NAME-1);
    message.msg_info.shm_name[MAX_SHM_NAME-1] = '\0';
strncpy(message.msg_info.path, path, MAX_PATH-1);
    message.msg_info.path[MAX_PATH-1] = '\0';

//wrong - gotta send whole message...
//if(mq_send(mq,(const char*) &message, sizeof(struct msg_info), 0) < 0)
if(mq_send(mq,(const char*) &message, sizeof(struct msg_buffer), 0) < 0){
    fprintf(stderr, "Error mq_send: %s.\n", strerror(errno));
}

fprintf(stdout, "Send message length is %ld.\n", sizeof(message));
fprintf(stdout, "path:%s\n", message.msg_info.path);
fprintf(stdout, "shm_name:%s\n", message.msg_info.shm_name);
fprintf(stdout, "shm_size:%ld\n", message.msg_info.shm_size);

mq_getattr(mq, &setAttr);
fprintf(stdout, "Msgs In Queue: %lu\n", setAttr.mq_curmsgs);
fprintf(stdout, "Msg Size: %lu\n", setAttr.mq_msgsize);

return bytes_transferred;
}

Your receiver must extract the data in the same way. The best approach would be to extract the data into a local buffer.

void *threadCacheProcess(void *thread_id){
ssize_t recMessageSize;
msg_buffer message;
unsigned int pri=0; //message priority

while(1){
    // recv message sent from proxy and parse
    recMessageSize = mq_receive(mq, (char *) &message, sizeof(struct msg_buffer), &pri);

    if( recMessageSize < 0 ) {
        int bad = errno;
        fprintf(stdout, "error: %d:\n", bad); perror(bad);
    }
    // block until we get valid message
    else {
        fprintf(stdout, "size %ld, priority %d\n", recMessageSize,pri);
        fprintf(stdout, "T%d Name:%s\n",id, message.msg_info.shm_name);
        fprintf(stdout, "T%d Size:%lu\n",id, message.msg_info.shm_size);
        fprintf(stdout, "T%d path:%s\n",id, message.msg_info.path);
    }
}
}
  • Thank you for going through and addressing what it is I was doing wrong with the sender. I am trying to now fix receiver. As you mention I need to match the entire struct size, so I changed it to msg_buffer like so recMessageSize = mq_receive(mq, (char *) &message, sizeof(struct msg_buffer), NULL);. Unfortunately it blocks forever and never receives from the message queue. How can I fix the receiver end? – Potion Nov 3 at 5:11
  • You are sending a message with priority = 0, yet you pass a null ptr for priority, and you also provided not enough space... are you sure you have the queues set up correctly? – ChuckCottrill Nov 3 at 5:52
  • Ive tried playing around with priority. Both with 0. The Null came from the Beej example I was experimenting with. Both sender and receiver use mq = mq_open(MQ_NAME, O_RDWR | O_CREAT, 0666, &attr);. I updated my post to show this as well as the &attr struct defined. – Potion Nov 3 at 6:11
  • "and you also provided not enough space". Im confused. Does specifying sizeof() the struct when calling mq_receive not satisfy this? – Potion Nov 3 at 7:24

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