I need to read a large text file of around 5-6 GB line by line using Java.

How can I do this quickly?

  • 58
    @kamaci et. al. This question should not be marked as a duplicate. "Quickly read the last line" is not an alternative, and its debatable whether "Quickest way to read text-file line by line" is. The quickest way to do something is not necessarily the common way. Furthermore, the answers below include code, the most relevant alternative you list does not. This question is useful. It is currently the top google search result for "java read file line by line". Finally, its off putting to arrive at stack overflow and find that 1 in every 2 question is flagged for disposal. – Patrick Cullen Feb 6 '13 at 3:47
  • 5
    Here is a comparison of speed for six possible implementations. – Serg M Ten Nov 15 '16 at 9:51
  • 2
    Event though I have been reading comments arguing that SO's close policy sucks, SO persists in it. It's such a narrow minded developer perspective to want to avoid redundancy at all costs! Just let it be! The cream will rise to the top and the sh*t will sink to the bottom just fine all by itself. Even though a question may have been asked before (which question isn't??), that does not mean that a new question may not be able to phrase it better, get better answers, rank higher in search engines etc. Interestingly, this question is now 'protected'.... – Stijn de Witt Oct 3 '17 at 10:19
  • It's incredible how questions get marked as duplicate by just reading the title. – Luke Oct 25 at 8:48

20 Answers 20

A common pattern is to use

try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file))) {
    String line;
    while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
       // process the line.
    }
}

You can read the data faster if you assume there is no character encoding. e.g. ASCII-7 but it won't make much difference. It is highly likely that what you do with the data will take much longer.

EDIT: A less common pattern to use which avoids the scope of line leaking.

try(BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file))) {
    for(String line; (line = br.readLine()) != null; ) {
        // process the line.
    }
    // line is not visible here.
}

UPDATE: In Java 8 you can do

try (Stream<String> stream = Files.lines(Paths.get(fileName))) {
        stream.forEach(System.out::println);
}

NOTE: You have to place the Stream in a try-with-resource block to ensure the #close method is called on it, otherwise the underlying file handle is never closed until GC does it much later.

  • 6
    What does this pattern look like with proper exception handling? I note that br.close() throws IOException, which seems surprising -- what could happen when closing a file that is opened for read, anyway? FileReader's constructor might throw a FileNotFound exception. – MikeB Mar 15 '13 at 20:16
  • 3
    If I have a 200MB file and it can read at 90MB/s then I expect it to take ~3s? Mine seem to take minutes, with this "slow" way of reading. I am on an SSD so read speeds should not be a problem? – Jiew Meng Nov 8 '13 at 0:06
  • 4
    @JiewMeng SO I would suspect something else you are doing is taking time. Can you try just reading the lines of the file and nothing else. – Peter Lawrey Nov 8 '13 at 0:22
  • 40
    Why not for(String line = br.readLine(); line != null; line = br.readLine()) Btw, in Java 8 you can do try( Stream<String> lines = Files.lines(...) ){ for( String line : (Iterable<String>) lines::iterator ) { ... } } Which is hard not to hate. – Aleksandr Dubinsky Dec 15 '13 at 9:17
  • 22
    @AleksandrDubinsky The problem I have with closures in Java 8 is that it very easily makes the code more complicated to read (as well as being slower) I can see lots of developers overusing it because it is "cool". – Peter Lawrey Dec 15 '13 at 10:33

Look at this blog:

The buffer size may be specified, or the default size may be used. The default is large enough for most purposes.

// Open the file
FileInputStream fstream = new FileInputStream("textfile.txt");
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fstream));

String strLine;

//Read File Line By Line
while ((strLine = br.readLine()) != null)   {
  // Print the content on the console
  System.out.println (strLine);
}

//Close the input stream
br.close();
  • 5
    My file is 1.5 Gig and it's not possible to read the file using your answer! – Aboozar Rajabi Nov 10 '16 at 12:24
  • 2
    @AboozarRajabi Of course it is possible. This code can read any text file. – user207421 May 7 '17 at 7:37
  • 4
    Downvoted for poor quality link. There is a completely pointless DataInputStream, and the wrong stream is closed. Nothing wrong with the Java Tutorial, and no need to cite arbitrary third-party Internet rubbish like this. – user207421 May 7 '17 at 7:41

Once is out (March 2014) you'll be able to use streams:

try (Stream<String> lines = Files.lines(Paths.get(filename), Charset.defaultCharset())) {
  lines.forEachOrdered(line -> process(line));
}

Printing all the lines in the file:

try (Stream<String> lines = Files.lines(file, Charset.defaultCharset())) {
  lines.forEachOrdered(System.out::println);
}
  • 1
    Use StandardCharsets.UTF_8, use Stream<String> for conciseness, and avoid using forEach() and especially forEachOrdered() unless there's a reason. – Aleksandr Dubinsky Dec 15 '13 at 9:29
  • 2
    Why avoid forEach()? Is it bad? – steventrouble Mar 19 '14 at 0:54
  • If I us forEach instead of forEachOrdered, the lines might be printed out of order, aren't they? – msayag Mar 20 '14 at 8:28
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    @steventrouble Take a look at: stackoverflow.com/questions/16635398/… It's not bad if you pass a short function reference like forEach(this::process), but it gets ugly if you write blocks of code as lambdas inside forEach(). – Aleksandr Dubinsky Mar 8 '15 at 14:54
  • 2
    @msayag, You're right, you need forEachOrdered in order to execute in-order. Be aware that you won't be able to parallelize the stream in that case, although I've found that parallelization doesn't turn on unless the file has thousands of lines. – Aleksandr Dubinsky Mar 8 '15 at 15:02

Here is a sample with full error handling and supporting charset specification for pre-Java 7. With Java 7 you can use try-with-resources syntax, which makes the code cleaner.

If you just want the default charset you can skip the InputStream and use FileReader.

InputStream ins = null; // raw byte-stream
Reader r = null; // cooked reader
BufferedReader br = null; // buffered for readLine()
try {
    String s;
    ins = new FileInputStream("textfile.txt");
    r = new InputStreamReader(ins, "UTF-8"); // leave charset out for default
    br = new BufferedReader(r);
    while ((s = br.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    System.err.println(e.getMessage()); // handle exception
}
finally {
    if (br != null) { try { br.close(); } catch(Throwable t) { /* ensure close happens */ } }
    if (r != null) { try { r.close(); } catch(Throwable t) { /* ensure close happens */ } }
    if (ins != null) { try { ins.close(); } catch(Throwable t) { /* ensure close happens */ } }
}

Here is the Groovy version, with full error handling:

File f = new File("textfile.txt");
f.withReader("UTF-8") { br ->
    br.eachLine { line ->
        println line;
    }
}
  • 1
    What does a ByteArrayInputStream fed by a string literal have to do with reading a large text file? – user207421 May 7 '17 at 7:42

In Java 8, you could do:

try (Stream<String> lines = Files.lines (file, StandardCharsets.UTF_8))
{
    for (String line : (Iterable<String>) lines::iterator)
    {
        ;
    }
}

Some notes: The stream returned by Files.lines (unlike most streams) needs to be closed. For the reasons mentioned here I avoid using forEach(). The strange code (Iterable<String>) lines::iterator casts a Stream to an Iterable.

  • By not implementing Iterable this code is definitively ugly although useful. It needs a cast (ie (Iterable<String>)) to work. – Stephan Dec 15 '13 at 12:24
  • How can I skip the first line with this method? – qed Nov 5 '14 at 21:05
  • 2
    @qed for(String line : (Iterable<String>) lines.skip(1)::iterator) – Aleksandr Dubinsky Nov 12 '14 at 0:48
  • 1
    If you’re not intending to actually use Stream features, using Files.newBufferedReader instead of Files.lines and repeatedly calling readLine() until null instead of using constructs like (Iterable<String>) lines::iterator seems to be much simpler… – Holger Jul 28 '17 at 11:14
  • Why do you use :: in lines::iterator? Only usage I know for :: is to package method name into lambda function. In for loop parameter after : should be variable while you get some lambda method using :: – Trismegistos Oct 4 '17 at 11:09

What you can do is scan the entire text using Scanner and go through the text line by line. Of course you should import the following:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.util.Scanner;
public static void readText throws FileNotFoundException {
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(new File("samplefilename.txt"));
    while(scan.hasNextLine()){
        String line = scan.nextLine();
        //Here you can manipulate the string the way you want
    }
}

Scanner basically scans all the text. The while loop is used to traverse through the entire text.

The .hasNextLine() function is a boolean that returns true if there are still more lines in the text. The .nextLine() function gives you an entire line as a String which you can then use the way you want. Try System.out.println(line) to print the text.

Side Note: .txt is the file type text.

  • Shouldn't the method declaration look instead of this: ´public static void readText throws FileNotFoundException(){´ Like: ´public static void readText() throws FileNotFoundException{´ – Ketcomp Jan 26 '16 at 16:13
  • This is considerably slower than BufferedReader.readLine(), and he asked for the best-performing method. – user207421 May 7 '17 at 7:43

FileReader won't let you specify the encoding, use InputStreamReaderinstead if you need to specify it:

try {
    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(filePath), "Cp1252"));         

    String line;
    while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
        // process the line.
    }
    br.close();

} catch (IOException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

If you imported this file from Windows, it might have ANSI encoding (Cp1252), so you have to specify the encoding.

  • Good point. Another way is to use Files.newBufferedReader – Aleksandr Dubinsky Mar 8 '15 at 15:18

In Java 7:

String folderPath = "C:/folderOfMyFile";
Path path = Paths.get(folderPath, "myFileName.csv"); //or any text file eg.: txt, bat, etc
Charset charset = Charset.forName("UTF-8");

try (BufferedReader reader = Files.newBufferedReader(path , charset)) {
  while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null ) {
    //separate all csv fields into string array
    String[] lineVariables = line.split(","); 
  }
} catch (IOException e) {
    System.err.println(e);
}
  • 9
    be aware! using line.split this way will NOT parse properly if a field contains a comma and it is surrounded by quotes. This split will ignore that and just separate the field in chunks using the internal comma. HTH, Marcelo. – Marcelo Finki Oct 13 '14 at 15:23
  • CSV: Comma Separated Values file, thus you shouldn't use comma in a csv field, unless you mean to add another field. So, use split for comma token in java when parsing a CSV file is perfectly fine and right – Diego Duarte Feb 19 '15 at 14:33
  • 7
    Diego, this is not correct. The only CSV standard (RFC 4180) specifically says "Fields containing line breaks (CRLF), double quotes, and commas should be enclosed in double-quotes." – serg.nechaev Feb 27 '15 at 2:06
  • 2
    Use StandardCharsets.UTF_8 to avoid the checked exception in Charset.forName("UTF-8") – Aleksandr Dubinsky Mar 8 '15 at 15:20
  • 2
    Thank you "Diego Duarte" for your comment; i must say i agree with what "serg.nechaev" replies. I see commas embedded in csv files 'all the time'. People expect that this will be accepted. with all due respect. also a big thanks to "serg.nechaev". IMHO you are right. Cheerse Everyone. – Marcelo Finki Mar 13 '15 at 15:09

I documented and tested 10 different ways to read a file in Java and then ran them against each other by making them read in test files from 1KB to 1GB. Here are the fastest 3 file reading methods for reading a 1GB test file.

Note that when running the performance tests I didn't output anything to the console since that would really slow down the test. I just wanted to test the raw reading speed.

1) java.nio.file.Files.readAllBytes()

Tested in Java 7, 8, 9. This was overall the fastest method. Reading a 1GB file was consistently just under 1 second.

import java.io..File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.Files;

public class ReadFile_Files_ReadAllBytes {
  public static void main(String [] pArgs) throws IOException {
    String fileName = "c:\\temp\\sample-1GB.txt";
    File file = new File(fileName);

    byte [] fileBytes = Files.readAllBytes(file.toPath());
    char singleChar;
    for(byte b : fileBytes) {
      singleChar = (char) b;
      System.out.print(singleChar);
    }
  }
}

2) java.nio.file.Files.lines()

This was tested successfully in Java 8 and 9 but it won't work in Java 7 because of the lack of support for lambda expressions. It took about 3.5 seconds to read in a 1GB file which put it in second place as far as reading larger files.

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.util.stream.Stream;

public class ReadFile_Files_Lines {
  public static void main(String[] pArgs) throws IOException {
    String fileName = "c:\\temp\\sample-1GB.txt";
    File file = new File(fileName);

    try (Stream linesStream = Files.lines(file.toPath())) {
      linesStream.forEach(line -> {
        System.out.println(line);
      });
    }
  }
}

3) BufferedReader

Tested to work in Java 7, 8, 9. This took about 4.5 seconds to read in a 1GB test file.

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;

public class ReadFile_BufferedReader_ReadLine {
  public static void main(String [] args) throws IOException {
    String fileName = "c:\\temp\\sample-1GB.txt";
    FileReader fileReader = new FileReader(fileName);

    try (BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(fileReader)) {
      String line;
      while((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
        System.out.println(line);
      }
    }
  }

You can find the complete rankings for all 10 file reading methods here.

You can use Scanner class

Scanner sc=new Scanner(file);
sc.nextLine();
  • 9
    This will bomb horribly on a large file. Large file was part of the OP's question. – Tim Aug 2 '13 at 16:46
  • 2
    @Tim 'Bomb horribly' is not a term I recognize in CS. What exactly do you mean? – user207421 Nov 17 '13 at 20:50
  • 4
    @Tim Why would it do so? – xehpuk Feb 22 '15 at 19:18
  • 2
    Using Scanner is fine, but this answer does not include the full code to use it properly. – Aleksandr Dubinsky Mar 8 '15 at 14:58
  • 5
    @Tim This code will neither 'bomb horribly' nor 'bog down' nor 'execute very slowly' nor 'most likely crash'. As a matter of fact as written it will only read one line, almost instaneously. You can read megabytes per second this way, although BufferedReader.readLine() is certainly several times as fast. If you think otherwise please provide your reasons. – user207421 Aug 3 '15 at 4:52

For Reading file with java 8

  package com.java.java8;

    import java.nio.file.Files;
    import java.nio.file.Paths;
    import java.util.stream.Stream;

    /**
     * The Class ReadLargeFile.
     *
     * @author Ankit Sood Apr 20, 2017
     */
    public class ReadLargeFile {

        /**
         * The main method.
         *
         * @param args
         *            the arguments
         */
        public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            Stream<String> stream = Files.lines(Paths.get("C:\\Users\\System\\Desktop\\demoData.txt"));
            stream.forEach(System.out::println);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        }
    }

In Java 8, there is also an alternative to using Files.lines(). If your input source isn't a file but something more abstract like a Reader or an InputStream, you can stream the lines via the BufferedReaders lines() method.

For example:

try( BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader( ... ) ) {
  reader.lines().foreach( line -> processLine( line ) );
}

will call processLine() for each input line read by the BufferedReader.

You need to use the readLine() method in class BufferedReader. Create a new object from that class and operate this method on him and save it to a string.

BufferReader Javadoc

  • Seems like link to BufferReaderAPI is broken – Sandeep Jun 20 '16 at 9:21

Java-9 :

try (Stream<String> stream = Files.lines(Paths.get(fileName))) {
        stream.forEach(System.out::println);
}
  • 1
    Does this code have a purpose? Eg, is it faster? – Aleksandr Dubinsky Mar 8 '15 at 15:15
  • 2
    I think you have to System.getProperty("os.name").equals("Linux") – SpringLearner Jul 9 '15 at 7:06
  • 5
    Don't compare strings with == ! – JonasCz Jun 7 '16 at 10:22
  • @SpringLearner You think so why? You're wrong. – user207421 May 7 '17 at 7:47
  • 5
    This is the canonical Java 8 example, as already posted by others. Why do you claim that this is “Java-9”? – Holger Jul 28 '17 at 11:18

The clear way to achieve this,

For example:

If you have dataFile.txt on your current directory

import java.io.*;
import java.util.Scanner;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;

public class readByLine
{
    public readByLine() throws FileNotFoundException
    {
        Scanner linReader = new Scanner(new File("dataFile.txt"));

        while (linReader.hasNext())
        {
            String line = linReader.nextLine();
            System.out.println(line);
        }
        linReader.close();

    }

    public static void main(String args[])  throws FileNotFoundException
    {
        new readByLine();
    }
}

The output like as below, enter image description here

  • Why is it clearer? And don't post pictures of text here. Post the text. – user207421 Oct 28 '16 at 2:49
  • You posted a picture. It is a picture of text. You could have cut and pasted the text directly into this page. Nobody said anything about posting programs. Posting pictures of text is a waste of your time, which I don't care about, and oyur bandwidth, which I do. – user207421 May 7 '17 at 7:46
  • @EJP, oh okay. I noted. thank you bro :) – Rajamohan S May 7 '17 at 9:25
BufferedReader br;
FileInputStream fin;
try {
    fin = new FileInputStream(fileName);
    br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fin));

    /*Path pathToFile = Paths.get(fileName);
    br = Files.newBufferedReader(pathToFile,StandardCharsets.US_ASCII);*/

    String line = br.readLine();
    while (line != null) {
        String[] attributes = line.split(",");
        Movie movie = createMovie(attributes);
        movies.add(movie);
        line = br.readLine();
    }
    fin.close();
    br.close();
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    System.out.println("Your Message");
} catch (IOException e) {
    System.out.println("Your Message");
}

It works for me. Hope It will help you too.

I usually do the reading routine straightforward:

void readResource(InputStream source) throws IOException {
    BufferedReader stream = null;
    try {
        stream = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(source));
        while (true) {
            String line = stream.readLine();
            if(line == null) {
                break;
            }
            //process line
            System.out.println(line)
        }
    } finally {
        closeQuiet(stream);
    }
}

static void closeQuiet(Closeable closeable) {
    if (closeable != null) {
        try {
            closeable.close();
        } catch (IOException ignore) {
        }
    }
}

You can also use apache commons io:

File file = new File("/home/user/file.txt");
try {
    List<String> lines = FileUtils.readLines(file);
} catch (IOException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}
  • 3
    FileUtils.readLines(file) is a deprecated method. Additionally, the method invokes IOUtils.readLines, which uses a BufferedReader and ArrayList. This is not a line-by-line method, and certainly not one that would be practical for reading several GB. – vallismortis Jun 21 '15 at 22:52

You can use streams to do it more precisely:

Files.lines(Paths.get("input.txt")).forEach(s -> stringBuffer.append(s);
  • 1
    Whats wrong in this answer? – spidy Nov 1 '17 at 7:20
  • 1
    Whats wrong here??? Why no one is providing comments?? – Anand Varkey Philips Mar 27 at 18:38
  • 2
    I agree that it is actually fine. Aguess, people dislike it because of strange StringBuffer choice (StringBuilder is generally preferred, even though it might just be a bad name for variable). Also because it is already mentioned above. – Andrii Rubtsov Apr 20 at 11:20

You can use this code:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;

public class ReadTextFile {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        try {

            File f = new File("src/com/data.txt");

            BufferedReader b = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(f));

            String readLine = "";

            System.out.println("Reading file using Buffered Reader");

            while ((readLine = b.readLine()) != null) {
                System.out.println(readLine);
            }

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

}

protected by bummi Sep 28 '17 at 7:11

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