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I am working on a new application that requires, the creation of DB Views. I am using EF core with MySql flavor and using the Code First approach to create the DB and tables. I didn't find a way to create a view though.If somehow, I could execute the raw sql in migration step, that might help in creation of view and later mapping that as the DbSet. I can't create the views manually as it would require the execution of the view script against the database, and that won't be possible in higher environment. Can someone please guide me. Help is really appreciated!

1
  • migrationBuilder.Sql(raw_sql);
    – Ivan Stoev
    Nov 4, 2019 at 13:06

3 Answers 3

19

As far as I know, you can't create views with EF Core directly. However, you can use migrations to execute arbitrary SQL when upgrading.

  1. Generate a migration in the package manager console, even if there is nothing really to do: add-migration CreatingTheView
  2. Open the generated migration class, file name: Migrations\yyyyMMdd_CreatingTheView.cs
  3. Add raw SQL to execute when upgrading by modifying the Up method: migrationBuilder.Sql("CREATE VIEW etc.");
  4. If you want to support downgrading, modify the Down method: migrationBuilder.Sql("DROP VIEW etc.");
4

Since you're using Code First, maybe the database is just an extension to the application, and not a primary goal of its own? In that case, you probably don't really need a view.

The database won't care if you just send it normal queries, and you have alternatives for abstracting them in the application layer. The most basic hack is to just create an IQueryable<T> property in your DbContext implementation (or an extension method), which queries the data you wish displayed. Something like this:

public sealed class DatabaseContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Transaction> Transactions { get; set; }

    public IQueryable<PerPersonSum> PerPersonSums
        => Transactions.GroupBy(t => t.Person,
                                (k, g) => new PerPersonSum
                                {
                                    Person = k,
                                    TotalAmount = g.Sum(t => t.Amount)
                                });
}

A more proper solution would be a keyless entity type:

public sealed class DatabaseContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Transaction> Transactions { get; set; }

    public DbSet<PerPersonSum> PerPersonSums { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<PerPersonSum>(e =>
        {
            e.HasNoKey();
            e.ToQuery(() => Transactions.GroupBy(t => t.Person,
                                                 (k, g) => new PerPersonSum
                                                 {
                                                     Person = k,
                                                     TotalAmount = g.Sum(t => t.Amount)
                                                 }));
        });
    }
}

Pre-3.0, it used to be called a Query Type and it could be used like this:

public sealed class DatabaseContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Transaction> Transactions { get; set; }

    public DbQuery<PerPersonSum> PerPersonSums { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Query<PerPersonSum>()
                    .ToQuery(() => Transactions.GroupBy(t => t.Person,
                                                        (k, g) => new PerPersonSum
                                                        {
                                                            Person = k,
                                                            TotalAmount = g.Sum(t => t.Amount)
                                                        }));
    }
}
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  • 1
    i really like this solution, feel like someone should be telling me why this is bad lol
    – workabyte
    Apr 11, 2020 at 4:30
  • 2
    @workabyte Depends on the purpose of the project. Is the application the point of the project, with data serving it? Or is data the focus, with application serving the data? I usually have data serving the application so I almost never use views (which si why I almost always use SQLite instead of a "real" RDBMS). If the database is the real product and is expected to survive longer than the application, views are probably preferred. On the other hand, in that case, going code-first is probably a mistake as well. Apr 11, 2020 at 19:17
  • 1
    @relatively_random Some databases do not treat views as saved querys and can optimize them more. Shouldn't that be a consideration as well? Jan 14, 2021 at 9:59
  • @InbarBarkai Sure sounds like it. Unfortunately, I'm not exactly an expert on databases and most of my experience comes from EFC with SQLite. Is this is a standard feature on basically all traditional database engines? SQLite really treats views as little more than text which gets copy-pasted into queries. At least it did last time I checked. Jan 14, 2021 at 14:19
  • @relatively_random As far a I know, Oracle and PostgreSQL are actually doing some optimizations on views. Maybe Microsoft SQL server do that as well but I did not work with it for quite some time. Jan 21, 2021 at 12:30
3

The answer from relatively_random almost worked for me, but I had to use this syntax to get it working:

migrationBuilder.Sql(@"exec('create view dbo.MyViewName as ....');");

and

migrationBuilder.Sql("exec('drop view dbo.MyViewName');");

Without that I got a sql error "Create View must be the only statement in batch".

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