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I have this compile-time sequence generation class (taken from here, and modified it a little bit):

#include <cstddef>

template <int...>
struct sequence {};

template <int... Ns>
struct generator;

template <std::size_t Count, int... Ns>  // XXX (read below)
struct generator<Count, Ns...> {
    using type = typename generator<Count - 1, Count - 1, Ns...>::type;
};

template <int... Ns>
struct generator<0, Ns...> {
    using type = sequence<Ns...>;
};

template <std::size_t N>
using sequence_t = typename generator<N>::type;

int main() {
    sequence_t<5> a;
    return 0;
}

This compiles fine under Visual Studio (even with the /permissive- switch). But it throws errors under GCC:

g++: error: template argument '(int)Count' involves template parameter(s)
g++:  struct generator<Count, Ns...> {
...

It throws errors under Clang as well:

clang++: error: ambiguous partial specializations of 'generator<0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4>'
clang++:    using type = typename generator<Count - 1, Count - 1, Ns...>::type;
...
clang++: note: partial specialization matches [with Count = 0, Ns = <0, 1, 2, 3, 4>]
clang++: struct generator<Count, Ns...> {
clang++:
clang++: note: partial specialization matches [with Ns = <0, 1, 2, 3, 4>]
clang++: struct generator<0, Ns...> {

After changing the size_t type in marked line (marked as XXX (read below)) to int, everyone compiles this sample code properly.

Who is right in this case? Visual Studio because it compiles the code, or GCC+Clang because it doesn't allow it to be compiled?

Why Visual Studio is able to compile the sample just fine? Does it have more relaxed implicit conversion rules than other compilers? Or is there a different reason for it? Any link that would point me to a document that could help me to decode these error messages would also be appreciated :)

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