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I'm a beginner with oracle and I would like to know how to solve the below issue (I also like to learn so would like it to get a bit of an explanation for the solution).

I've two tables one contains rules and the other one contains the logs. Now I want to be able to check which rule is used for an entry in the log. This way I want to check if all rules are still valid or should be updated.

First table: t_logon_log

username  os_user program terminal hostname ip_address logon_time
username1 user1   unknown unknown  server1  1.2.3.4    12-09-19
username1 user2   unknown unknown  server2  2.3.4.5    19-09-19
username1 user3   unknown unknown  server3  3.4.5.6    19-10-19

Second table: t_allowed_connections

rule# username  os_user program hostname ip_address apply_rule
60    username1 user2   *       *        *          Yes
8     username1 *       *       *        *          Yes

Now I've created a query, which simply groups the log table together so I can manually review it.

select      Count(*), USERNAME, OS_USER, PROGRAM, TERMINAL, HOSTNAME, IP_ADDRESS
from        t_logon_log
where       LOGON_TIME > '01-01-19'
group by    USERNAME, OS_USER, PROGRAM, TERMINAL, HOSTNAME, IP_ADDRESS
order by    USERNAME;

But I would like to create a query which delivers an output which gives me back for each row from the query above which rule# number is valid for that row.

With this I want to compare the result to the rules and see which ones can be deleted on made more strictly.

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I am guessing that '*' means "match any value". Otherwise the rules need to match the specific value.

So, you would use join, taking into account the wildcards:

select l.*,
       ac.rule_number
from t_logon_log l join
     t_allowed_connections ac
     on (ac.username = l.username or ac.username = '*') and
        (ac.os_user = l.os_user or ac.os_user = '*') and
        (ac.os_user = l.program or ac.program = '*') and
        (ac.os_user = l.hostname or ac.hostname = '*') and
        (ac.os_user = l.ip_address or ac.ip_address = '*') 
where ac.apply_rule = 'Yes';
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You could use a join to find a matching rule for each connection.

select  *
from    t_logon_log l
left join
        t_allowed_connections r
on      (r.username = '*' or r.username = l.username) and
        (r.os_user = '*' or r.os_user = l.os_user) and
        (r.program = '*' or r.program = l.program) and
        ...

A left join repeats each matching row in the left hand table for each row in the right hand table. If no rows match, a row consisting of null values is used.

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  • Thank you, so in this case if the log row doesn't match any of the rows in t_allowed_connections the column behind will give a null value? – Leroy vd Linden Nov 5 '19 at 12:22
  • Yeah, it'll show with the rule columns as null. You can use on r.apply_rule = 'Yes' and (r.username = '*' ... to only consider applied rules – Andomar Nov 5 '19 at 12:26

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