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With the latest ASP.NET Core 3, and EF Core 3, I want to seed data as I've done in previous version of EF. I notice that in the Microsoft docs, they point at this code as an example of how to seed.

https://github.com/aspnet/EntityFramework.Docs/tree/master/samples/core/Modeling/DataSeeding/Migrations

It updates the migration with code like this:

        migrationBuilder.InsertData(
            table: "Posts",
            columns: new[] { "PostId", "BlogId", "Content", "Title", "AuthorName_First", "AuthorName_Last" },
            values: new object[] { 1, 1, "Test 1", "First post", "Andriy", "Svyryd" });

        migrationBuilder.InsertData(
            table: "Posts",
            columns: new[] { "PostId", "BlogId", "Content", "Title", "AuthorName_First", "AuthorName_Last" },
            values: new object[] { 2, 1, "Test 2", "Second post", "Diego", "Vega" });

This seems "uncomfortable" to me as the way I've learned to init all my data and tables is to remove my migrations folder and then recreate the database. If I manually update a migration, then I'm stuck keeping this migration forever.

Is there a better way to handle seeding data in EF Core 3? Maybe with dbContext or somehow putting something in the model class itself?

1

You can seed data in Program.cs. Like following.

public static async Task Main(string[] args)
{
    var host = CreateHostBuilder(args).Build();

    using (var scope = host.Services.GetRequiredService<IServiceScopeFactory>().CreateScope())
    {
        await SeedData.EnsureSeedData(scope.ServiceProvider);
    }

    host.Run();
}

Create a class SeedData and in it write your seeding logic.

public static async Task EnsureSeedData(IServiceProvider provider)
{
    var dbContext = provider.GetRequiredService<MyDbContext>();
    await dbContext.Database.MigrateAsync();

    if(!await dbContext.MyTables.AnyAsync())
    {
        await dbContext.MyTables.AddAsync(new MyTable {})
        await dbContext.SaveChangesAsync();
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Why to use a ServiceProvider? Why can't we just instantiate the MyDbContext in Main itself? – kotpal Aug 24 at 22:59
  • @kotpal because we normally register Dbcontext in startup. So it can use the connection string we specified there and any other options we used there. More importantly if you have migrations in separate class library, we need to specify that assembly name also in options. You can intialize Dbcontext in main itself, but you need to duplicate all options here also. – pavinan Aug 25 at 10:14
  • Ok. I will look into using ServiceProvider. Right now I am indeed duplicating the options and such - because I don't want the DbContext used by API to have to go through the migration and seeding code. So I moved the migration & seeding into their own assembly - and implement IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<TContext>. I also use a CLI to insert data (as POCO created from JSON but with no Ids). Seeding requires Ids - and I use seeding to add application / system data. . – kotpal Aug 28 at 3:14

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