3

Imagine I have a fishTank class. This class will represent a fish tank, it has a size, some boundaries where fish can be, some obstacles where fish can not be, some water flow through the tank that moves the fish around, etc.

class fishTank
{
private:
    double length;
    double height;
//And some more complex things that define a fish tank
public:
     fishtank(double, double, ...);
}

Now I need to add fish into the tank. What is the appropriate way of declaring my fish class? (Fish represents a large group of individual fish)

  1. My fish will always be inside a fishTank, there makes no sense for me to have fish alone.
  2. Fish needs to know the properties of the fishTank, everything in the fish class depends on the tank: How to load the fish in the tank depends on the size of the tank, the way the fish move depends on the size and properties of the trap, etc.
  3. There can be many different kind of fish in the same tank.

My first attempt is to create the fish class and pass the tank as an argument in the fish constructor. Then add a vector of fish into the tank as a private member:

class fish
{
private:
    //All properties of fish
public:
    fish(const fishTank& aTank, All other properties of fish);
}


class fishTank
{
private:
    std::vector<fish> fishInTank;
    //Same as before
public:
    //Same as before;
}

Is this really the proper way of implementing what I need? I just don't think this is a good design, I will need the tank as arguments for the fish, and then add each fish into the tank itself. Does this make sense?

Would this be the correct place to implement something like an abstract fish class, or nest fish inside the tank?

  • Yes, sorry. Its just that I am actually working with plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap. – PhysicsPDF Nov 6 '19 at 13:10
  • Aside: it's conventional, and therefore makes code more readable, to start class names with a capital letter: eg class Fish. – Paul Evans Nov 6 '19 at 13:13
  • There can be many different kind of fish in the same tank. Different instances of fish or instances of different derived classes of fish? In the latter case, the std::vector<fish> is probably a bad choice. – Scheff Nov 6 '19 at 13:16
  • Rather than giving the fish a reference to the fish tank, I would instead suggest adding methods to the fish that tell the fish what to do and the fish tank will call that method providing all arguments required (i.e. the fish tank width and height are passed in to make sure the fish doesn't leave the bounds of the tank) – Thomas Cook Nov 6 '19 at 14:31
2

Honestly, just like eating a Reeces, there is no right or correct way to do this. Me personally? The fish tank would have a vector of fish, and then if the fish need to swim for 1 tick, I would have a swim method on the fish tank. This would call each fish and tell them to swim, passing the fish tank as an argument to their swim method. Like so:

class FishTank;

class Fish {
    public:
        void swim(const FishTank* tank) {

        }
};

class FishTank {
    private:
        std::vector<Fish> allFish;

    public:
        void tick() {
            for(Fish& fish : allFish){
                fish.swim(this);
            }
        }
};

There are really a dozen and a half ways to go about this. There's a book I'd recommend reading that goes over stuff like this: Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, John Vlissides (ISBN 10: 0201633612)

  • 1
    Fish would still need to be declared as friend in FishTank right? – PhysicsPDF Nov 6 '19 at 13:52
  • 1
    @PhysicsPDF If Fish needed to access private members of tank in Fish::swim then yes, Fish would need to be a friend of FishTank. – Paul Evans Nov 6 '19 at 14:27
1

Fish needs to know the properties of the fishTank

Then you might consider making fish a friend of fishTank:

class fishTank
{
private:
    friend fish;
    std::vector<fish> fishInTank;
...

now any instance of fish can access all the private members of any given instance of fishTank.

1

Your Fish class may be declared inside the FishTank class, even protected or private. This would make it harder/impossible to use outside of Fish. But there is no way to dictate it can only be a direct member of FishTank.

class FishTank {
private:
    class Fish {
        Fish(const Fishtank &parent);
        …
    };
    std::vector<Fish> fishInTank;

When the class is declared inside, it is automatically a friend of FishTank and can access all members of the tank, including private members.

As Paul Evans notes, you can also use friend designation to achieve the latter effect. It is helpful if Fish is a complex class that would clutter the FishTank class declaration and better be kept in another header file. Fish would at least need to be declared public if your FishTank ever exposes fishes to the outside; also it might be a burden for any party that deals with Fish to include full FishTank header.

You might also work with a namespace to explain the semantic grouping:

namespace fish_tank {
    class Fish { … };
    class Tank { … };
};
1

Here is my way:

class FishTank;
class Fish
{
protected:
    FishTank* tank;
    Fish(FishTank* t) { tank = t; };
public:
    void swim();

    friend class FishTank;
};

class FishTank
{
private:
    std::vector<Fish*> allFish;
public:
    Fish* AddFish() {
        Fish* f = new Fish(this);
        allFish.push_back(f);
        return f;
    }
    void tick() {
        for (Fish* fish : allFish) {
            fish->swim();
        }
    }
    friend class Fish;
};

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