7

Consider a library function with the following signature:

from typing import Iterator

def get_numbers() -> Iterator[int]:
    ...

Let's look at some simple code that consumes it:

for i in get_numbers():
    print(i)

Nothing interesting so far. But let's say we don't care for even numbers. Only numbers that are odd, like us:

for i in get_numbers():
    if i & 1 == 0:
        raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!")
    print(i)

Now let's try an implementation of get_numbers:

def get_numbers() -> Iterator[int]:
    yield 1
    yield 2
    yield 3

Nothing very interesting here. The results of running our little for are pretty much what we'd expect:

>>> for i in get_numbers():
  2     if i & 1 == 0:
  3         raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!")
  4     print(i)
1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in <module>
ValueError: Ew, an even number!

Ew, an even number!
>>>

We'd get the exact same results if get_numbers had a simpler implementation:

def get_numbers() -> Iterator[int]:
    return iter([1, 2, 3])

But let's instead suppose that get_numbers needs to remain a generator because it manages some resource.

def get_numbers() -> Iterator[int]:
    acquire_some_resource()
    try:
        yield 1
        yield 2
        yield 3
    finally:
        release_some_resource()

For our purposes, the resource we'll manage will just be text printed on the screen:

def acquire_some_resource() -> None:
    print("generating some numbers")

def release_some_resource() -> None:
    print("done generating numbers")

Our output is still predictable:

>>> for i in get_numbers():
  2     if i & 1 == 0:
  3         raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!")
  4     print(i)
generating some numbers
1
done generating numbers
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 3, in <module>
ValueError: Ew, an even number!

Ew, an even number!
>>>

But what if we can't use a simple for loop? What if we want to ignore the first number, for example? (Let's pretend that itertools.islice isn't a thing.)

>>> it = get_numbers()
  2 next(it, None)
  3 for i in it:
  4     if i & 1 == 0:
  5         raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!")
  6     print(i)
generating some numbers
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 5, in <module>
ValueError: Ew, an even number!

Ew, an even number!
>>>

Notice something? We acquired our resource, as evidenced by the text "generating some numbers", but we never released it.

The right thing to do is to make sure the generator gets closed:

>>> it = get_numbers()
  2 try:
  3     next(it, None)
  4     for i in it:
  5         if i & 1 == 0:
  6             raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!")
  7         print(i)
  8 finally:
  9     it.close()
generating some numbers
done generating numbers
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 6, in <module>
ValueError: Ew, an even number!

Ew, an even number!
>>>

The problem with this approach is that this assumes that get_numbers() returns a generator, and thus has a close method. But its signature doesn't promise that. What if its implementation is the simpler one I gave earlier?

>>> def get_numbers() -> Iterator[int]:
  2     return iter([1, 2, 3])
  3 
  4 it = get_numbers()
  5 try:
  6     next(it, None)
  7     for i in it:
  8         if i & 1 == 0:
  9             raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!")
 10         print(i)
 11 finally:
 12     it.close()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 12, in <module>
AttributeError: 'list_iterator' object has no attribute 'close'

'list_iterator' object has no attribute 'close'
>>>

So the right thing to do here is something pretty tedious:

it = get_numbers()
try:
    next(it, None)
    for i in it: 
        if i & 1 == 0: 
            raise ValueError("Ew, an even number!") 
        print(i) 
finally: 
    if hasattr(it, "close"): 
        it.close()

I can wrap this up in a context manager to make it simpler, but it feels like I'm doing something the language should be doing for me, or at minimum, that the callee should be concerning itself with, not the caller.

Is there a simpler way to handle this?

  • 1
    I think the key difference is you instantiating the generator with it = get_numbers() instead of for i in get_numbers(). In the latter option, the interpreter understands that you are done with the generator and thus releases it. However in the former, the interpreter have no idea if you still plan to use it, so it makes sense for it to retain it in memory until explicitly told to close it. I think this is exactly as it's meant to behave. – r.ook Nov 6 '19 at 19:48
  • But the language doesn't offer me, as the consumer of some library, the means to determine whether or not I have to explicitly close it, nor does it offer the developer of said library the means to ensure that his generator gets closed. – P Daddy Nov 6 '19 at 19:51
  • You could del it. The generator would be closed properly. (you may need a gc.collect() to be sure). @r.ook is right, it looks like a matter of variable scope. – Demi-Lune Nov 6 '19 at 19:56
  • 2
    The caller has to take some responsibility, because the language can't tell the difference between you being truly done with the iterator and you simply not using it after the last call to next. One way of doing that is to use a with statement, which explicitly brackets the use of the iterator. – chepner Nov 6 '19 at 20:00
  • IMO, in general a language aims to cover most of the use cases, and leave it up to the users to manage the edge cases. Also when the code exits, the resource would be released either way so I believe this counts as a non-critical feature and therefore not implemented. – r.ook Nov 6 '19 at 20:00
3

As my comment mentioned, one way to properly structure this would be using the contextlib.contextmanager to decorate your generator:

from typing import Iterator
import contextlib

@contextlib.contextmanager
def get_numbers() -> Iterator[int]:
    acquire_some_resource()
    try:
        yield iter([1, 2, 3])
    finally:
        release_some_resource()

Then when you use the generator:

with get_numbers() as et:
    for i in et:
        if i % 2 == 0:
            raise ValueError()
        else:
            print(i)

Result:

generating some numbers
1
done generating numbers
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#64>", line 4, in <module>
    raise ValueError()
ValueError

This allows the contextmanager decorator to manage your resources for you without worrying handling the release. If you're feeling courageous, you might even build your own context manager class with __enter__ and __exit__ function to handle your resource.

I think the key takeaway here is that since your generator is expected to manage a resource, you should either be using the with statement or always be closing it afterwards, much like f = open(...) should always follow with a f.close()

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    +1 What I like about this is that the callee essentially declares that it needs to be cleaned up, effectively moving some of this responsibility to the callee where it belongs. What I don't like is that it still requires cooperation between the callee and caller. So, for instance, if this were an implementation of an ABC, the implementer couldn't choose whether or not it needed cleanup. That's a detail that just can't be encapsulated away. But that's just a limitation of the language at this point, and your answer is, I think, the right way to do it. – P Daddy Nov 6 '19 at 21:51
0

One option is to actually use the Generator type, as to properly signal that you are returning a Generator.

| improve this answer | |
  • Embedding the generator in a wrapper function doesn't change the results in my testing. I wouldn't expect it to. The it variable in my example still holds a reference to effectively the same thing (a generator's __iter__ method just returns self, AFAIK), so it gets garbage collected no sooner—which is to say still probably never, such as if the script exits. – P Daddy Nov 6 '19 at 21:56
  • Declaring the function as returning a generator helps to signal to the caller that it needs to close it, but I was hoping to avoid changing the signature, to cover the ABC implementation scenario and keep the fact that it's a generator a private implementation detail, since a generator is compatible with an iterator. It seems that this isn't really possible. So if that's the case, and the signature has to change, I like r.ook's idea of making it a context manager to enable the use of with. – P Daddy Nov 6 '19 at 21:58
  • @PDaddy you are right about the wrapper, I tested it with the wrong function. I will update the answer to just keep the Generator type as an option. – Sebastian Kreft Nov 7 '19 at 14:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.