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I have been banging my head against a wall trying to understand how to make a function type-safe, but have not been able to do it. The function should take in an object and return a number. Here's a very simple example (for my actual application, the interfaces are more complex).

interface Parent {
  id: number;
  children: Child[];
}

interface Child {
  text: string;
}

const parents: Parent[] = [
  {
    id: 1, 
    children: [
      {text: 'Child 1a'}, {text: 'Child 1b'}, 
      {text: 'Child 1c'}, {text: 'Child 1d'}, 
      {text: 'Child 1e'}
    ]
  },
  {
    id: 2, 
    children: [
      {text: 'Child 2a'}, {text: 'Child 2b'}, {text: 'Child 2c'}
    ]
  }  
];

function getMaxNumChildren<T>(data: T[], childKey: keyof T) {
  return data.reduce((max: number, parent: T) => {
    return max > parent[childKey].length ? max : parent[childKey].length;
  }, 0);
}

console.log(getMaxNumChildren<Parent>(parents, 'children')); // 5

So, as you can imagine, parent[childKey].length throws an error because typescript doesn't actually know that T[keyof T] is an array.

I've tried casting to any[], among other random things, but I can't seem to get this right and keep the function purely generic. Any ideas?

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  • As long as you're certain that childKey will always point to an array, you could cast parent as an Array: (parent[childKey] as Array<any>).length. Or you could do a type check to make sure length exists before running the reduce. Or maybe defining a parent type that T extends which has an Array indexed with a string?
    – Chris B.
    Nov 7, 2019 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

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The simplest way I can imagine getting this to work is to make the function generic in K, the type of childKey, and annotating that data is an array of objects with keys in K and properties with a numeric length property, like this:

function getMaxNumChildren<K extends keyof any>(
  data: Array<Record<K, { length: number }>>,
  childKey: K
) {
  return data.reduce((max, parent) => {
    return max > parent[childKey].length ? max : parent[childKey].length;
  }, 0);
}

The compiler is then able to verify that parent[childkey] has a numeric length and there are no errors. Then you call it like this:

console.log(getMaxNumChildren(parents, 'children')); // 5

Note that you don't call getMaxNumChildren<Parent>(...) anymore because the generic type is the key type, not the object type. You could call getMaxNumChildren<"children">(...) if you want, but I'd just let type inference work for you here.


Hope that works for you. If it doesn't work for your use case, please consider editing the question to include more details. Good luck!

Link to code

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You need to let TypeScript know about two generic types, not just one. The first being some key and the second being some object where that key has a value of an array.

Try something like this:

function getMaxNumChildren<TKey extends string, TObj extends { [key in TKey]: unknown[] }>(data: TObj[], childKey: TKey) {
    // ...
}
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You are over-complicating it. Just use a Parent array

function getMaxNumChildren<T>(data: Parent[]T[], keyGetter: (obj: T) => Array<unknown>) {
  return data.reduce((max: number, parent: ParentT) => {
    return Math.max > (keyGetter(parent.children).length ?, max : parent.children.length;);
  }, 0);
}


Updated answer

Better to use a callback than abusing the type system.

function getMaxNumChildren<T>(data: T[], keyGetter: (obj: T) => Array<unknown>) {
  return data.reduce((max: number, parent: T) => {
    return Math.max(keyGetter(parent).length, max);
  }, 0);
}

You use it like this:

console.log(getMaxNumChildren<Parent>(parents, (p) => p.children));
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  • If that was the only interface I had to interact with, then yes, this would be easy. But I need to do this in multiple places in my app with various objects that aren't alike at all. So the getMaxNumChildren function needs to be generic.
    – exk0730
    Nov 7, 2019 at 18:57
  • @exk0730 I see.
    – smac89
    Nov 7, 2019 at 19:00

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