149

Are timestamp values stored differently in PostgreSQL when the data type is WITH TIME ZONE versus WITHOUT TIME ZONE? Can the differences be illustrated with simple test cases?

126

The differences are covered at the PostgreSQL documentation for date/time types. Yes, the treatment of TIME or TIMESTAMP differs between one WITH TIME ZONE or WITHOUT TIME ZONE. It doesn't affect how the values are stored; it affects how they are interpreted.

The effects of time zones on these data types is covered specifically in the docs. The difference arises from what the system can reasonably know about the value:

  • With a time zone as part of the value, the value can be rendered as a local time in the client.

  • Without a time zone as part of the value, the obvious default time zone is UTC, so it is rendered for that time zone.

The behaviour differs depending on at least three factors:

  • The timezone setting in the client.
  • The data type (i.e. WITH TIME ZONE or WITHOUT TIME ZONE) of the value.
  • Whether the value is specified with a particular time zone.

Here are examples covering the combinations of those factors:

foo=> SET TIMEZONE TO 'Japan';
SET
foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00+09
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 06:00:00+09
(1 row)

foo=> SET TIMEZONE TO 'Australia/Melbourne';
SET
foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00+11
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP;
      timestamp      
---------------------
 2011-01-01 00:00:00
(1 row)

foo=> SELECT '2011-01-01 00:00:00+03'::TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE;
      timestamptz       
------------------------
 2011-01-01 08:00:00+11
(1 row)
  • 72
    Correct only if referring to the process of inserting/retrieving values. But readers should understand that both data types, timestamp with time zone and timestamp without time zone, in Postgres do *not actually store time zone information. You can confirm this with a glance at the data type doc page: Both types takes up the same number of octets and have the save range of values, thus no room for storing time zone info. The text of the page confirms this. Something of a misnomer: "without tz" means "ignore offset when inserting data" and "with tz" means "use offset to adjust to UTC". – Basil Bourque Feb 15 '14 at 9:51
  • 32
    The data types are a misnomer in a second way: They say "time zone" but actually we are talking about offset from UTC/GMT. A time zone is actually an offset plus rules/history about Daylight Saving Time (DST) and other anomalies. – Basil Bourque Feb 15 '14 at 9:52
  • 4
    I would rather say an offset is a time zone plus rules for DST. You cannot discover the time zone given an offset, but you can discover the offset given the time zone and DST rules. – igorsantos07 Nov 22 '15 at 23:30
  • 2
    Citing the official doc : All timezone-aware dates and times are stored internally in UTC. They are converted to local time in the zone specified by the TimeZone configuration parameter before being displayed to the client. – Guillaume Husta Apr 24 '17 at 11:27
  • 2
    @igorsantos07 A time zone is the set of rules/history about DST changes and other changes. Your wording seems superfluous. And your statement that "an offset is a time zone plus rules for DST" is simply wrong: an offset is merely a number of hours, minutes, and seconds – nothing more, nothing less. – Basil Bourque Jan 2 '18 at 17:54
17

I try to explain it more understandably than the referred PostgreSQL documentation.

Neither TIMESTAMP variants store a time zone (or an offset), despite what the names suggest. The difference is in the interpretation of the stored data (and in the intended application), not in the storage format itself:

  • TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIME ZONE stores local date-time (aka. wall calendar date and wall clock time). Its time zone is unspecified as far as PostgreSQL can tell (though your application may knows what it is). Hence, PostgreSQL does no time zone related conversion on input or output. If the value was entered into the database as '2011-07-01 06:30:30', then no mater in what time zone you display it later, it will still say year 2011, month 07, day 01, 06 hours, 30 minutes, and 30 seconds (in some format). Also, any offset or time zone you specify in the input is ignored by PostgreSQL, so '2011-07-01 06:30:30+00' and '2011-07-01 06:30:30+05' are the same as just '2011-07-01 06:30:30'. For Java developers: it's analogous to java.time.LocalDateTime.

  • TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE stores a point on the UTC time line. How it looks (how many hours, minutes, etc.) depends on your time zone, but it always refers to the same "physical" instant (like the moment of an actual physical event). The input is internally converted to UTC, and that's how it's stored. For that, the offset of the input must be known, so when the input contains no explicit offset or time zone (like '2011-07-01 06:30:30') it's assumed to be in the current time zone of the PostgreSQL session, otherwise the explicitly specified offset or time zone is used (as in '2011-07-01 06:30:30+05'). The output is displayed converted to the current time zone of the PostgreSQL session. For Java developers: It's analogous to java.time.Instant (with lower resolution though), but with JDBC and JPA 2.2 you are supposed to map it to java.time.OffsetDateTime (or to java.util.Date or java.sql.Timestamp of course).

Some say that both TIMESTAMP variations store UTC date-time. Kind of, but it's confusing to put it that way in my opinion. TIMESTAMP WITHOUT TIME ZONE is stored like a TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE, which rendered with UTC time zone happens to give the same year, month, day, hours, minutes, seconds, and microseconds as they are in the local date-time. But it's not meant to represent the point on the time line that the UTC interpretation says, it's just the way the local date-time fields are encoded. (It's some cluster of dots on the time line, as the real time zone is not UTC; we don't know what it is.)

  • There is nothing wrong with retrieving a TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE as a Instant. Both represent a point on the timeline in UTC. Instant is preferred, in my opinion, over OffsetDateTime as it is more self-documenting: A TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE is always retrieved from the database as UTC, and an Instant is always in UTC so a natural match, while an OffsetDateTime can carry other offsets. – Basil Bourque Jan 3 '18 at 0:56
  • @BasilBourque Unfortunately, the current JDBC specification, the JPA 2.2 specification, and also the PostgreSQL JDBC documentation only mentions OffsetDateTime as the mapped Java type. I'm not sure if Instance is still unofficially supported somewhere. – ddekany Jan 3 '18 at 9:12
  • question, you say any offset i specify in the input such as '2011-07-01 06:30:30+00' and '2011-07-01 06:30:30+05' is ignored but i'm able to do insert into test_table (date) values ('2018-03-24T00:00:00-05:00'::timestamptz); and it will convert it to utc correctly. where date is timestamp without timezone. I'm trying to understand what the main value of timestamp with timezone is and having trouble. – pk1m Mar 25 '18 at 4:05
  • @pk1m You complicate matters with the ::timestamptz. With that you convert the string to TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE, and when that will be further converted to WITHOUT TIME ZONE, that will store the "wall calendar" day and wall clock time of that instant as seen from your session time zone (which is maybe UTC). It still only will be a local timestamp with unspecified offset (no zone). – ddekany Mar 26 '18 at 8:11
  • i'm working with python, and thats what gets inserted when insert a timestamp aware datettime object. It seems to me there is value in using timestamp with time zone, but its not necessary to handle timezones. – pk1m Mar 26 '18 at 14:51
9

Here is an example that should help. If you have a timestamp with a timezone, you can convert that timestamp into any other timezone. If you haven't got a base timezone it won't be converted correctly.

SELECT now(),
   now()::timestamp,
   now() AT TIME ZONE 'CST',
   now()::timestamp AT TIME ZONE 'CST'

Output:

-[ RECORD 1 ]---------------------------
now      | 2018-09-15 17:01:36.399357+03
now      | 2018-09-15 17:01:36.399357
timezone | 2018-09-15 08:01:36.399357
timezone | 2018-09-16 02:01:36.399357+03
  • 4
    The statement "won't be converted correctly" is simply not true. You have to understand what timestamp and timestamptz mean. timestamptz means an absolute point in time (UTC) whereas timestamp denotes what the clock showed in a certain time zone. Thus, when converting timestamptz to a time zone you are asking what did the clock show in New York at this absolute point in time? whereas when "converting" a timestamp, you're asking what was the absolute point in time when the clock in New York showed x? – fphilipe Mar 27 '16 at 16:03
  • The AT TIME ZONE construct is a brain teaser its own, even if you already understand the WITH vs. WITHOUT TIME ZONE types. So it's a curious choice for explaining them. (: (AT TIME ZONE converts a WITH TIME ZONE timestamp to a WITHOUT TIME ZONE timestamp, and vice versa... not exactly obvious.) – ddekany Jan 3 '18 at 15:40
  • now()::timestamp AT TIME ZONE 'CST' does not make sense, unless you what at what instant a clock for zone 'CST' would show the time that your local clock is currently showing – Jasen Apr 10 at 3:41

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