50

Something that comes up quite a lot in my current work is that there is a generalised process that needs to happen, but then the odd part of that process needs to happen slightly differently depending on the value of a certain variable, and I'm not quite sure what's the most elegant way to handle this.

I'll use the example that we usually have, which is doing things slightly differently depending on the country we're dealing with.

So I have a class, let's call it Processor:

public class Processor
{
    public string Process(string country, string text)
    {
        text.Capitalise();

        text.RemovePunctuation();

        text.Replace("é", "e");

        var split = text.Split(",");

        string.Join("|", split);
    }
}

Except that only some of those actions need to happen for certain countries. For example, only 6 countries require the capitalisation step. The character to split on might change depending on the country. Replacing the accented 'e' might only be required depending on the country.

Obviously you could solve it by doing something like this:

public string Process(string country, string text)
{
    if (country == "USA" || country == "GBR")
    {
        text.Capitalise();
    }

    if (country == "DEU")
    {
        text.RemovePunctuation();
    }

    if (country != "FRA")
    {
        text.Replace("é", "e");
    }

    var separator = DetermineSeparator(country);
    var split = text.Split(separator);

    string.Join("|", split);
}

But when you're dealing with all the possible countries in the world, that becomes very cumbersome. And regardless, the if statements make the logic harder to read (at least, if you imagine a more complex method than the example), and the cyclomatic complexity starts to creep up pretty fast.

So at the moment I'm sort of doing something like this:

public class Processor
{
    CountrySpecificHandlerFactory handlerFactory;

    public Processor(CountrySpecificHandlerFactory handlerFactory)
    {
        this.handlerFactory = handlerFactory;
    }

    public string Process(string country, string text)
    {
        var handlers = this.handlerFactory.CreateHandlers(country);
        handlers.Capitalier.Capitalise(text);

        handlers.PunctuationHandler.RemovePunctuation(text);

        handlers.SpecialCharacterHandler.ReplaceSpecialCharacters(text);

        var separator = handlers.SeparatorHandler.DetermineSeparator();
        var split = text.Split(separator);

        string.Join("|", split);
    }
}

Handlers:

public class CountrySpecificHandlerFactory
{
    private static IDictionary<string, ICapitaliser> capitaliserDictionary
                                    = new Dictionary<string, ICapitaliser>
    {
        { "USA", new Capitaliser() },
        { "GBR", new Capitaliser() },
        { "FRA", new ThingThatDoesNotCapitaliseButImplementsICapitaliser() },
        { "DEU", new ThingThatDoesNotCapitaliseButImplementsICapitaliser() },
    };

    // Imagine the other dictionaries like this...

    public CreateHandlers(string country)
    {
        return new CountrySpecificHandlers
        {
            Capitaliser = capitaliserDictionary[country],
            PunctuationHanlder = punctuationDictionary[country],
            // etc...
        };
    }
}

public class CountrySpecificHandlers
{
    public ICapitaliser Capitaliser { get; private set; }
    public IPunctuationHanlder PunctuationHanlder { get; private set; }
    public ISpecialCharacterHandler SpecialCharacterHandler { get; private set; }
    public ISeparatorHandler SeparatorHandler { get; private set; }
}

Which equally I'm not really sure I like. The logic is still somewhat obscured by all of the factory creation and you can't simply look at the original method and see what happens when a "GBR" process is executed, for example. You also end up creating a lot of classes (in more complex examples than this) in the style GbrPunctuationHandler, UsaPunctuationHandler, etc... which means that you have to look at several different classes to figure out all of the possible actions that could happen during punctuation handling. Obviously I don't want one giant class with a billion if statements, but equally 20 classes with slightly differing logic also feels clunky.

Basically I think I've got myself into some sort of OOP knot and don't quite know a good way of untangling it. I was wondering if there was a pattern out there that would help with this type of process?

  • Looks like you have a PreProcess functionality, that could be implemented differently based on some of the countries, DetermineSeparator can be there for all of them, and a PostProcess. All of them can be protected virtual void with a default implementation, and then you can have specific Processors per country – Icepickle Nov 8 at 10:34
  • Your job is to make in given time frame something that works, and can be maintained in foreseeable future, by you or someone else. If several options can satisfy both conditions then you are free to choose any of them, according to your likes. – Dialecticus Nov 8 at 10:34
  • 2
    A viable option for you is to have a configuration. So in your code you don't check for specific country, but for specific configuration option. But each country will have a specific set of those configuration options. For instance instead of if (country == "DEU") you check if (config.ShouldRemovePunctuation). – Dialecticus Nov 8 at 10:39
  • 9
    If countries have various options, why is country a string rather than an instance of a class that models those options? – Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 8 at 10:40
  • @Damien_The_Unbeliever - could you elaborate a little on this? Is the answer by Robert Brautigam below along the lines of what you're suggestion? - ah can see your answer now, thanks! – John Darvill Nov 8 at 10:50

10 Answers 10

46

I would suggest encapsulating all options in one class:

public class ProcessOptions
{
  public bool Capitalise { get; set; }
  public bool RemovePunctuation { get; set; }
  public bool Replace { get; set; }
  public char ReplaceChar { get; set; }
  public char ReplacementChar { get; set; }
  public char JoinChar { get; set; }
}

and pass it into the Process method:

public string Process(ProcessOptions options, string text)
{
  if(options.Capitalise)
    text.Capitalise();

  if(options.RemovePunctuation)
    text.RemovePunctuation();

  if(options.Replace)
    text.Replace(options.ReplaceChar, options.ReplacementChar);

  var split = text.Split(options.SplitChar);

  string.Join(options.JoinChar, split);
}
  • 4
    Not sure why something like this wasn't tried before jumping to CountrySpecificHandlerFactory... o_0 – Mateen Ulhaq Nov 9 at 7:08
  • As long as there are no too specialized options, I would definitely go this way. If the options are serialized into text-file, it also allows non-programmers to define new variants / update existing ones without need to change to application. – Tom Nov 9 at 11:37
  • 4
    That public class ProcessOptions should really just be [Flags] enum class ProcessOptions : int { ... }... – Drunken Code Monkey Nov 9 at 14:59
  • And I guess if they need, they could have a map of countries to ProcessOptions. Very convenient. – theonlygusti Nov 10 at 22:13
22

When the .NET framework set out to handle these sorts of problems, it didn't model everything as string. So you have, for instance, the CultureInfo class:

Provides information about a specific culture (called a locale for unmanaged code development). The information includes the names for the culture, the writing system, the calendar used, the sort order of strings, and formatting for dates and numbers.

Now, this class may not contain the specific features that you need, but you can obviously create something analogous. And then you change your Process method:

public string Process(CountryInfo country, string text)

Your CountryInfo class can then have a bool RequiresCapitalization property, etc, that helps your Process method direct its processing appropriately.

11

Maybe you could have one Processor per country?

public class FrProcessor : Processor {
    protected override string Separator => ".";

    protected override string ProcessSpecific(string text) {
        return text.Replace("é", "e");
    }
}

public class UsaProcessor : Processor {
    protected override string Separator => ",";

    protected override string ProcessSpecific(string text) {
        return text.Capitalise().RemovePunctuation();
    }
}

And one base class to handle common parts of the processing:

public abstract class Processor {
    protected abstract string Separator { get; }

    protected virtual string ProcessSpecific(string text) { }

    private string ProcessCommon(string text) {
        var split = text.Split(Separator);
        return string.Join("|", split);
    }

    public string Process(string text) {
        var s = ProcessSpecific(text);
        return ProcessCommon(s);
    }
}

Also, you should rework your return types because it won't compile as you wrote them - sometimes a string method doesn't return anything.

  • I guess I was trying to follow the composition over inheritance mantra. But yes it's definitely an option, thanks for the reply. – John Darvill Nov 8 at 10:48
  • Fair enough. I think inheritance is justified in some cases but it really depends on how you plan to load/store/invoke/change your methods and processing in the end. – Corentin Pane Nov 8 at 10:51
  • 2
    Sometimes, inheritance is the right tool for the job. If you've got a process that's going to behave in mostly the same way in several different situations, but also has several parts that will behave differently in different situations, that's a good sign you should consider using inheritance. – Tanner Swett Nov 9 at 4:21
4

You can create a common interface with a Process method...

public interface IProcessor
{
    string Process(string text);
}

Then you implement it for each country...

public class Processors
{
    public class GBR : IProcessor
    {
        public string Process(string text)
        {
            return $"{text} (processed with GBR rules)";
        }
    }

    public class FRA : IProcessor
    {
        public string Process(string text)
        {
            return $"{text} (processed with FRA rules)";
        }
    }
}

You can then create a common method for instantiating and executing each country related class...

// also place these in the Processors class above
public static IProcessor CreateProcessor(string country)
{
    var typeName = $"{typeof(Processors).FullName}+{country}";
    var processor = (IProcessor)Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(Processors)).CreateInstance(typeName);
    return processor;
}

public static string Process(string country, string text)
{
    var processor = CreateProcessor(country);
    return processor?.Process(text);
}

Then you just need to create and use the processors like so...

// create a processor object for multiple use, if needed...
var processorGbr = Processors.CreateProcessor("GBR");
Console.WriteLine(processorGbr.Process("This is some text."));

// create and use a processor for one-time use
Console.WriteLine(Processors.Process("FRA", "This is some more text."));

Here's a working dotnet fiddle example...

You place all the country-specific processing in each country class. Create a common class (in the Processing class) for all the actual individual methods, so each country processor becomes a list of other common calls, rather than copy the code in each country class.

Note: You'll need to add...

using System.Assembly;

in order for the static method to create an instance of the country class.

  • Is not reflection remarkably slow in comparison with no reflected code? is it worth it for this case? – jlvaquero Nov 8 at 12:38
  • @jlvaquero No, reflection is not remarkably slow at all. Of course there is a performance hit over specifying a type at design time, but it is really a negligible performance difference and only noticeable when you overuse it. I've implemented large messaging systems built around generic object handling and we have had no reason to question performance at all, and that's with huge amounts of throughput. With no noticeable difference in performance I'll always go with simple to maintain code, like this. – Archer Nov 8 at 13:18
  • If you’re reflecting, wouldn’t you want to remove the country string from each call to Process, and instead use it once to obtain the correct IProcessor? You’d typically be processing a lot of text according to the rules of the same country. – Davislor Nov 8 at 21:01
  • @Davislor That's exactly what this code does. When you call Process("GBR", "text"); it executes the static method that creates an instance of the GBR processor and executes the Process method on that. It only executes it on one instance, for that specific country type. – Archer Nov 9 at 11:46
  • @Archer Right, so in the typical case where you’re processing multiple strings according to the rules for the same country, it would be more efficient to create the instance once—or look up a constant instance in a hash table/Dictionary and return a reference to that. You can then call the text-transformation on the same instance. Creating a new instance for every call and then discarding it, rather than re-using it for every call, is wasteful. – Davislor Nov 9 at 12:03
2

A few versions ago, the C# swtich was given full support for pattern matching. So that "multiple countries match" case is easily done. While it still has no fall through ability, one input can match multiple cases with pattern matching. It could maybe make that if-spam a bit clearer.

Npw a switch can usually be replaced with a Collection. You need to be using Delegates and a Dictionary. Process can be replaced with.

public delegate string ProcessDelegate(string text);

Then you could make a Dictionary:

var Processors = new Dictionary<string, ProcessDelegate>(){
  { "USA", EnglishProcessor },
  { "GBR", EnglishProcessor },
  { "DEU", GermanProcessor }
}

I used functionNames to hand in the Delegate. But you could use the Lambda syntax to provide the entire code there. That way you could just hide that whole Collection like you would any other large collection. And the code becomes a simple lookup:

ProcessDelegate currentProcessor = Processors[country];
string processedString = currentProcessor(country);

Those are pretty much the two options. You may want to consider using Enumerations instead of strings for the matching, but that is a minor detail.

2

I would perhaps (depending on the details of your use-case) go with the Country being a "real" object instead of a string. The keyword is "polymorphism".

So basically it would look like this:

public interface Country {
   string Process(string text);
}

Then you can create specialized countries for those that you need. Note: you don't have to create Country object for all countries, you can have LatinlikeCountry, or even GenericCountry. There you can collect what should be done, even re-using others, like:

public class France {
   public string Process(string text) {
      return new GenericCountry().process(text)
         .replace('a', 'b');
   }
}

Or similar. Country may be actually Language, I'm not sure about the use-case, but I you get the point.

Also, the method of course should not be Process() it should be the thing that you actually need done. Like Words() or whatever.

  • 1
    I wrote something wordier, but I think this is basically what I like the best. If the use case needs to look up these objects based on a country string, it can use Christopher’s solution with this. The implementation of the interfaces could even be a class whose instances set traits like in Michal’s answer, to optimize for space rather than time. – Davislor Nov 9 at 16:13
1

You want to delegate to (nod to chain of responsibility) something that knows about its own culture. So use or make a Country or CultureInfo type construct, as mentioned above in other answers.

But in general and fundamentally your problem is you are taking procedural constructs like 'processor' and applying them to OO. OO is about representing real world concepts from a business or problem domain in software. Processor does not translate to anything in the real world apart from software itself. Whenever you have classes like Processor or Manager or Governor, alarm bells should ring.

0

I was wondering if there was a pattern out there that would help with this type of process

Chain of reponsibility is the kind of thing you may be looking for but in OOP is somewhat cumbersome...

What about a more functional approach with C#?

using System;


namespace Kata {

  class Kata {


    static void Main() {

      var text = "     testing this thing for DEU          ";
      Console.WriteLine(Process.For("DEU")(text));

      text = "     testing this thing for USA          ";
      Console.WriteLine(Process.For("USA")(text));

      Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public static class Process {

      public static Func<string, string> For(string country) {

        Func<string, string> baseFnc = (string text) => text;

        var aggregatedFnc = ApplyToUpper(baseFnc, country);
        aggregatedFnc = ApplyTrim(aggregatedFnc, country);

        return aggregatedFnc;

      }

      private static Func<string, string> ApplyToUpper(Func<string, string> currentFnc, string country) {

        string toUpper(string text) => currentFnc(text).ToUpper();

        Func<string, string> fnc = null;

        switch (country) {
          case "USA":
          case "GBR":
          case "DEU":
            fnc = toUpper;
            break;
          default:
            fnc = currentFnc;
            break;
        }
        return fnc;
      }

      private static Func<string, string> ApplyTrim(Func<string, string> currentFnc, string country) {

        string trim(string text) => currentFnc(text).Trim();

        Func<string, string> fnc = null;

        switch (country) {
          case "DEU":
            fnc = trim;
            break;
          default:
            fnc = currentFnc;
            break;
        }
        return fnc;
      }
    }
  }
}

NOTE: It does not have to be all static of course. If Process class need state you can use a instanced class or partially applied function ;) .

You can build the Process for each country on startup, store each one in a indexed collection and retrieve them when needed with O(1) cost.

0

I’m sorry that I long ago coined the term “objects” for this topic because it gets many people to focus on the lesser idea. The big idea is messaging.

~ Alan Kay, On Messaging

I would simply implement routines Capitalise, RemovePunctuation etc. as subprocesses that can be messaged with a text and country parameters, and would return a processed text.

Use dictionaries to group countries that fit a specific attribute (if you prefer lists, that would work as well with only a slight performance cost). For example: CapitalisationApplicableCountries and PunctuationRemovalApplicableCountries.

/// Runs like a pipe: passing the text through several stages of subprocesses
public string Process(string country, string text)
{
    text = Capitalise(country, text);
    text = RemovePunctuation(country, text);
    // And so on and so forth...

    return text;
}

private string Capitalise(string country, string text)
{
    if ( ! CapitalisationApplicableCountries.ContainsKey(country) )
    {
        /* skip */
        return text;
    }

    /* do the capitalisation */
    return capitalisedText;
}

private string RemovePunctuation(string country, string text)
{
    if ( ! PunctuationRemovalApplicableCountries.ContainsKey(country) )
    {
        /* skip */
        return text;
    }

    /* do the punctuation removal */
    return punctuationFreeText;
}

private string Replace(string country, string text)
{
    // Implement it following the pattern demonstrated earlier.
}
0

I feel that the information about the countries should be kept in data, not in code. So instead of a CountryInfo class or CapitalisationApplicableCountries dictionary, you could have a database with a record for each country and a field for each processing step, and then the processing could go through the fields for a given country and process accordingly. The maintenance is then mainly in the database, with new code only needed when new steps are needed, and the data can be human readable in the database. This assumes the steps are independent and don't interfere with each other; if that is not so things are complicated.

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