70

Google is deprecating Android AsyncTask API in Android 11 and suggesting to use java.util.concurrent instead. you can check out the commit here

 *
 * @deprecated Use the standard <code>java.util.concurrent</code> or
 *   <a href="https://developer.android.com/topic/libraries/architecture/coroutines">
 *   Kotlin concurrency utilities</a> instead.
 */
@Deprecated
public abstract class AsyncTask<Params, Progress, Result> {

If you’re maintaining an older codebase with asynchronous tasks in Android, you’re likely going to have to change it in future. My question is that what should be proper replacement of the code snippet shown below using java.util.concurrent. It is a static inner class of an Activity. I am looking for something that will work with minSdkVersion 16

private static class LongRunningTask extends AsyncTask<String, Void, MyPojo> {
        private static final String TAG = MyActivity.LongRunningTask.class.getSimpleName();
        private WeakReference<MyActivity> activityReference;

        LongRunningTask(MyActivity context) {
            activityReference = new WeakReference<>(context);
        }

        @Override
        protected MyPojo doInBackground(String... params) {
            // Some long running task
            
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(MyPojo data) {

            MyActivity activity = activityReference.get();
            activity.progressBar.setVisibility(View.GONE);
            populateData(activity, data) ;
        }     


    }
  • 13
    "Deprecated" means that Google is recommending that you move to something else. It does not mean that the class will be removed any time soon. In particular, AsyncTask cannot be removed without breaking backwards compatibility. – CommonsWare Nov 8 '19 at 13:52
  • Possible duplicate of Is AsyncTask deprecated now w/ AsyncTaskLoader? – Style-7 Nov 8 '19 at 14:21
  • 4
    @Style-7 it is not. – EpicPandaForce Nov 8 '19 at 14:55
  • There is no such thing as a "static inner class". You mean a static nested class. – beroal Mar 5 '20 at 17:56

14 Answers 14

59
private WeakReference<MyActivity> activityReference;

Good riddance that it's deprecated, because the WeakReference<Context> was always a hack, and not a proper solution.

Now people will have the opportunity to sanitize their code.


AsyncTask<String, Void, MyPojo> 

Based on this code, Progress is actually not needed, and there is a String input + MyPojo output.

This is actually quite easy to accomplish without any use of AsyncTask.

public class TaskRunner {
    private final Executor executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor(); // change according to your requirements
    private final Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());

    public interface Callback<R> {
        void onComplete(R result);
    }

    public <R> void executeAsync(Callable<R> callable, Callback<R> callback) {
        executor.execute(() -> {
            final R result = callable.call();
            handler.post(() -> {
                callback.onComplete(result);
            });
        });
    }
}

How to pass in the String? Like so:

class LongRunningTask implements Callable<MyPojo> {
    private final String input;

    public LongRunningTask(String input) {
        this.input = input;
    }

    @Override
    public MyPojo call() {
        // Some long running task
        return myPojo;
    }
}

And

// in ViewModel
taskRunner.executeAsync(new LongRunningTask(input), (data) -> {
    // MyActivity activity = activityReference.get();
    // activity.progressBar.setVisibility(View.GONE);
    // populateData(activity, data) ;

    loadingLiveData.setValue(false);
    dataLiveData.setValue(data);
});

// in Activity
@Override
protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

    setContentView(R.layout.main_activity);

    viewModel = ViewModelProviders.of(this).get(MyViewModel.class);
    viewModel.loadingLiveData.observe(this, (loading) -> {
        if(loading) {
            progressBar.setVisibility(View.VISIBLE);
        } else {
            progressBar.setVisibility(View.GONE);
        }
    });

    viewModel.dataLiveData.observe(this, (data) -> {
        populateData(data);
    }); 
}

This example used a single-threaded pool which is good for DB writes (or serialized network requests), but if you want something for DB reads or multiple requests, you can consider the following Executor configuration:

private static final Executor THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR =
        new ThreadPoolExecutor(5, 128, 1,
                TimeUnit.SECONDS, new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>());
  • I am getting an error on executor.post. Cannot resolve method – Kris B Nov 9 '19 at 0:37
  • @KrisB apparently it's called execute() instead of post() – EpicPandaForce Nov 9 '19 at 11:14
  • Do you know if it's ok to pass a Context into this? I know that passing a Context into AsyncTask was one of it's issues. – Kris B Nov 9 '19 at 22:40
  • 1
    newSingleThreadExecutor is better for writes, but you should definitely use the THREAD_POOL_EXECUTOR at the end of the post for database reads. – EpicPandaForce Nov 11 '19 at 1:08
  • 1
    I really appreciated this example. Thanks! I ended up using this almost exactly as is. I used a static executor like you showed in your code sample at the very end but still used Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor(). – dontangg Jun 24 '20 at 22:56
15

According to the Android documentation AsyncTask was deprecated in API level 30 and it is suggested to use the standard java.util.concurrent or Kotlin concurrency utilities instead.

Using the latter it can be achieved pretty simple:

  1. Create generic extension function on CoroutineScope:

     fun <R> CoroutineScope.executeAsyncTask(
             onPreExecute: () -> Unit,
             doInBackground: () -> R,
             onPostExecute: (R) -> Unit
     ) = launch {
         onPreExecute() // runs in Main Thread
         val result = withContext(Dispatchers.IO) { 
             doInBackground() // runs in background thread without blocking the Main Thread
         }
         onPostExecute(result) // runs in Main Thread
     } 
    
  2. Use the function with any CoroutineScope:

    • In ViewModel:

      class MyViewModel : ViewModel() {
      
          fun someFun() {
              viewModelScope.executeAsyncTask(onPreExecute = {
                  // ... runs in Main Thread
              }, doInBackground = {
                  // ... runs in Worker(Background) Thread
                  "Result" // send data to "onPostExecute"
              }, onPostExecute = {
                  // runs in Main Thread
                  // ... here "it" is the data returned from "doInBackground"
              })
          }
      }
      
    • In Activity or Fragment:

      lifecycleScope.executeAsyncTask(onPreExecute = {
          // ... runs in Main Thread
      }, doInBackground = {
          // ... runs in Worker(Background) Thread
          "Result" // send data to "onPostExecute"
      }, onPostExecute = {
          // runs in Main Thread
          // ... here "it" is the data returned from "doInBackground"
      })
      

    To use viewModelScope or lifecycleScope add next line(s) to dependencies of the app's build.gradle file:

    implementation "androidx.lifecycle:lifecycle-viewmodel-ktx:$LIFECYCLE_VERSION" // for viewModelScope
    implementation "androidx.lifecycle:lifecycle-runtime-ktx:$LIFECYCLE_VERSION" // for lifecycleScope
    

    At the time of writing final LIFECYCLE_VERSION = "2.3.0-alpha05"

UPDATE:

Also we can implement progress updating using onProgressUpdate function:

fun <P, R> CoroutineScope.executeAsyncTask(
        onPreExecute: () -> Unit,
        doInBackground: suspend (suspend (P) -> Unit) -> R,
        onPostExecute: (R) -> Unit,
        onProgressUpdate: (P) -> Unit
) = launch {
    onPreExecute()

    val result = withContext(Dispatchers.IO) {
        doInBackground {
            withContext(Dispatchers.Main) { onProgressUpdate(it) }
        }
    }
    onPostExecute(result)
}

Using any CoroutineScope (see implementations above) we can call it:

someScope.executeAsyncTask(
    onPreExecute = {
        // ... runs in Main Thread
    }, doInBackground = { publishProgress: suspend (progress: Int) -> Unit ->
        
        // ... runs in Background Thread

        // simulate progress update
        publishProgress(50) // call `publishProgress` to update progress, `onProgressUpdate` will be called
        delay(1000)
        publishProgress(100)

        
        "Result" // send data to "onPostExecute"
    }, onPostExecute = {
        // runs in Main Thread
        // ... here "it" is a data returned from "doInBackground"
    }, onProgressUpdate = {
        // runs in Main Thread
        // ... here "it" contains progress
    }
)
  • Do you have any suggestions on how to implement the onProgressUpdate as well using the kotlin coroutines? – Peter Jul 11 '20 at 5:55
14

One of the simplest alternative is to use Thread

new Thread(new Runnable({
    public void run(){
       // do your stuff
       runOnUIThread(new Runnable({
          public void run(){
              // do onPostExecute stuff
          }
       });
    })).start();

If your project supports JAVA 8, you can use lambda

new Thread(() -> {
        // do background stuff here
        runOnUiThread(()->{
            // OnPostExecute stuff here
        });
    }).start();
  • How to show percentage when background stuff called? – Ahamadullah Saikat Oct 3 '20 at 12:16
  • You need to use runOnUiThread to update your progress-bar or any other mechanism you are using for updating / displaying % of task completed. – mayank1513 Oct 3 '20 at 13:17
  • 2
    This solution has several drawbacks. First, the thread keeps a reference to the activity, this might leak the context and crash the app. Second, we cannot use this from a fragment. Third, we cannot update progress of the background task, Fourth, there is no way to cancel the thread. Finally, it creates many boilerplate code in the app. – Son Truong Nov 21 '20 at 5:53
11

You can directly use Executors from java.util.concurrent package.

I also searched about it and I found a solution in this Android Async API is Deprecated post.

Unfortunately the post is using Kotlin, but after a little effort I have converted it to Java. So here is the solution.

    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());

    executor.execute(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {

            //Background work here

            handler.post(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    //UI Thread work here
                }
            });
        }
    });

Pretty simple right? You can simplify it little more if you are using Java8 in your project.

    ExecutorService executor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
    Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());

    executor.execute(() -> {
        //Background work here
        handler.post(() -> {
            //UI Thread work here
        });
    });

Still, it cannot defeat kotlin terms of conciseness of the code, but better than the previous java version.

Hope this will help you. Thank You

5

Android deprecated AsyncTask API in Android 11 to get rid of a share of problems to begin with.

So, what's now?

  • Threads
  • Executers
  • RxJava
  • Listenable Futures
  • Coroutines 🔥

Why Coroutines?

Coroutines are the Kotlin way to do asynchronous programming. Compiler support is stable since Kotlin 1.3, together with a kotlinx.coroutines library -

  • Structured Concurrency
  • Non-blocking, sequential code
  • Cancellation propagation
  • Natural Exception Handling
  • I heard Coroutines had "easy entry". Does that mean its easy to breach? – Branddd Nov 11 '20 at 10:50
4

Google recommends using Java’s Concurrency framework or Kotlin Coroutines. but Rxjava end to have much more flexibility and features then java concurrency so gained quite a bit of popularity.

2

Here I created a Alternative for AsyncTask using Coroutines which can be used same as AsyncTask without changing much code base in your project.

  1. Create a new Abstract class AsyncTaskCoroutine which takes input parameter and output parameter datatypes of-course these parameters are optional :)

     import kotlinx.coroutines.Dispatchers
     import kotlinx.coroutines.GlobalScope
     import kotlinx.coroutines.async
     import kotlinx.coroutines.launch
    
     abstract class AsyncTaskCoroutine<I, O> {
         var result: O? = null
         //private var result: O
         open fun onPreExecute() {}
    
         open fun onPostExecute(result: O?) {}
         abstract fun doInBackground(vararg params: I): O
    
         fun <T> execute(vararg input: I) {
             GlobalScope.launch(Dispatchers.Main) {
                 onPreExecute()
                 callAsync(*input)
             }
         }
    
         private suspend fun callAsync(vararg input: I) {
             GlobalScope.async(Dispatchers.IO) {
                 result = doInBackground(*input)
             }.await()
             GlobalScope.launch(Dispatchers.Main) {
    
                 onPostExecute(result)
    
    
             }
         }
     }
    

2 . Inside Activity use this as same as your old AsycnTask now

 new AsyncTaskCoroutine() {
                @Override
                public Object doInBackground(Object[] params) {
                    return null;
                }
    
                @Override
                public void onPostExecute(@Nullable Object result) {
    
                }
    
                @Override
                public void onPreExecute() {
    
                }
            }.execute();
  1. InCase if you need to send pass params

      new AsyncTaskCoroutine<Integer, Boolean>() {
    
         @Override
         public Boolean doInBackground(Integer... params) {
             return null;
         }
    
         @Override
         public void onPostExecute(@Nullable Boolean result) {
    
         }
    
         @Override
         public void onPreExecute() {
    
         }
     }.execute();
    
  • 1
    no kotlin please, first use Java, then maybe Kotlin as an alternative for those who are using it. Thanks – Darksymphony Oct 28 '20 at 19:32
  • 1
    @Darksymphony I completely disagree with you, question is old in terms of using Java. If you are still using Java for Android, you need to rethink your choice. He wrote a very good alternative for AsynTask. – Pankaj Kumar Dec 24 '20 at 3:31
  • hopefully Java will stay for next X years as the basic language for android. Someone lazy came with Kotlin and forced it to android devs with it's funny commands :) Maybe one day I will rethink. But as long as we have a choice, I'll stay with Java – Darksymphony Jan 2 at 22:41
  • @Darksymphony Where is the problem to write some parts with Kotlin and some with JAVA? Should work without any real problems. – The incredible Jan Jan 11 at 15:25
  • @TheincredibleJan yes you are right, but works not without including Kotlin dependencies – Darksymphony Jan 11 at 15:50
1

You can use this custom class as an alternative of the AsyncTask<>, this is the same as AsyncTask so you not need to apply extra efforts for the same.

import android.os.Handler;
import android.os.Looper;

import androidx.annotation.NonNull;
import androidx.annotation.Nullable;

import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService;
import java.util.concurrent.SynchronousQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.ThreadPoolExecutor;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class TaskRunner {

    private static final int CORE_THREADS = 3;
    private static final long KEEP_ALIVE_SECONDS = 60L;
    private static TaskRunner taskRunner = null;
    private Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
    private ThreadPoolExecutor executor;

    private TaskRunner() {
        executor = newThreadPoolExecutor();
    }

    public static TaskRunner getInstance() {
        if (taskRunner == null) {
            taskRunner = new TaskRunner();
        }
        return taskRunner;
    }

    public void shutdownService() {
        if (executor != null) {
            executor.shutdown();
        }
    }

    public void execute(Runnable command) {
        executor.execute(command);
    }

    public ExecutorService getExecutor() {
        return executor;
    }

    public <R> void executeCallable(@NonNull Callable<R> callable, @NonNull OnCompletedCallback<R> callback) {
        executor.execute(() -> {
            R result = null;
            try {
                result = callable.call();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace(); // log this exception
            } finally {
                final R finalResult = result;
                handler.post(() -> callback.onComplete(finalResult));
            }
        });
    }

    private ThreadPoolExecutor newThreadPoolExecutor() {
        return new ThreadPoolExecutor(
                CORE_THREADS,
                Integer.MAX_VALUE,
                KEEP_ALIVE_SECONDS,
                TimeUnit.SECONDS,
                new SynchronousQueue<>()
        );
    }

    public interface OnCompletedCallback<R> {
        void onComplete(@Nullable R result);
    }
}

How to use it? Please follow the below examples.

With lambda expressions

TaskRunner.getInstance().executeCallable(() -> 1, result -> {
});


TaskRunner.getInstance().execute(() -> {
});

Without lambda expressions

TaskRunner.getInstance().executeCallable(new Callable<Integer>() {
    @Override
    public Integer call() throws Exception {
        return 1;
    }
}, new TaskRunner.OnCompletedCallback<Integer>() {
    @Override
    public void onComplete(@Nullable Integer result) {

    }
});

TaskRunner.getInstance().execute(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {

    }
});

Note: Don't forget to shutdown executors service

TaskRunner.getInstance().shutdownService();
1

Use this class to execute background task in Background Thread this class is work for all android API version include Android 11 also this code is same work like AsyncTask with doInBackground and onPostExecute methods

    public abstract class BackgroundTask {

    private Activity activity;
    public BackgroundTask(Activity activity) {
        this.activity = activity;
    }

    private void startBackground() {
        new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {

                doInBackground();
                activity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
                    public void run() {

                        onPostExecute();
                    }
                });
            }
        }).start();
    }
    public void execute(){
        startBackground();
    }

    public abstract void doInBackground();
    public abstract void onPostExecute();

}

After copy this class then Use Easyly like this

new BackgroundTask(MainActivity.this) {
        @Override
        public void doInBackground() {

            //put you background code
            //same like doingBackground
            //Background Thread
        }

        @Override
        public void onPostExecute() {

            //hear is result part same
            //same like post execute
            //UI Thread(update your UI widget)
        }
    }.execute();
1

This is an alternative to android.os.AsyncTask class:

abstract class AsyncTask<Params, Progress, Result>(
        private val scope: LifecycleCoroutineScope,
        private var coroutineContext: CoroutineContext = Dispatchers.Default,
) {
    private var job: Job? = null
    private var result: Result? = null

    open fun onPreExecute() {}

    fun execute(params: Params) {
        job = scope.executeAsyncTask(
                onPreExecute = {
                    onPreExecute()
                },
                doInBackground = { publishProgress: suspend (progress: Progress) -> Unit ->
                    result = doInBackGround(publishProgress, params)
                    result
                },
                onPostExecute = {
                    onPostExecute(it)
                },
                onProgressUpdate = {
                    onProgressUpdate(it)
                },
                coroutineContext)
    }

    open fun onPostExecute(result: Result?) {}

    abstract suspend fun doInBackGround(publishProgress: suspend (progress: Progress) -> Unit, params: Params): Result?

    open fun onProgressUpdate(progress: Progress) {}

    fun cancel() = job?.let {
        if (it.isActive) {
            it.cancel()
            onCancelled(result)
        }
    }

    open fun onCancelled(result: Result?) {}

    private fun <Progress, Result> CoroutineScope.executeAsyncTask(
            onPreExecute: () -> Unit,
            doInBackground: suspend (suspend (Progress) -> Unit) -> Result,
            onPostExecute: (Result) -> Unit,
            onProgressUpdate: (Progress) -> Unit,
            coroutineContext: CoroutineContext,
    ) = launch(Dispatchers.Main) {
        onPreExecute()
        val result = withContext(coroutineContext) {
            doInBackground {
                withContext(Dispatchers.Main) { onProgressUpdate(it) }
            }
        }
        onPostExecute(result)
    }
}
1

You can migrate to next approaches depends your needs

  • Thread + Handler
  • Executor
  • Future
  • IntentService
  • JobScheduler
  • RxJava
  • Coroutines (Kotlin)

[Android async variants]

0

My custom replacement: https://github.com/JohnyDaDeveloper/AndroidAsync

It only works when the app is running (more specifically the activity which scheduled the task), but it's capable of updating the UI after the background task was completed

EDIT: My AsyncTask no longer reqires Activiy to function.

0

Just replace the whole class with this Thread and put it in a method to pass variables

new Thread(() -> {
            // do background stuff here
            runOnUiThread(()->{
                // OnPostExecute stuff here
              
            });
        }).start();

and in Fragment add the Context to the runOnUiThread() methode:

 new Thread(() -> {
            // do background stuff here
            context.runOnUiThread(()->{
                // OnPostExecute stuff here
            });
        }).start();
0

HandlerThread can be used as an alternative of AsyncTask. They are long-running threads. An example of HandlerThread is below:

You can create two handler objects. One of them will be used to send message from workerThread to UI Thread.

Handler uiHandler,workerHandler;
Message msg;
HandlerThread handlerThread = new HandlerThread("MyHandlerThread");
handlerThread.start();
Handler.Callback callback=new Handler.Callback() {
        @Override
        public boolean handleMessage(@NonNull Message msg) {
            // handle messages sent from working thread (like updating UI)...
            return true;
        }
    }
uiHandler=new Handler(callback);
workerHandler = new Handler(handlerThread.getLooper());
workerHandler.post(new Runnable(){
           // Perform required task
           uiHandler.sendMessage(msg); // this message will be sent to and handled by UI Thread
});

Also, remember HandlerThreads run outside of your activity’s lifecycle, so they need to be cleaned up properly or else you will have thread leaks. You can use quit() or quitSafely() methods in onDestroy() of Activity to prevent thread leaks.

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