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I am new to C# and have a question. I am not sure if this question or similar to it was asked before however, I couldn't find a clear solution. I have created a method in C# and its parameter is a generic method:

public void MyMethod (some_generic_method)

That "some_generic_method" may have different numbers of parameters with homogeneous datatypes. How should I create the signature of "MyMethod"?

Edit: I will try to explain as clearly as possible why the asked solution is needed. I am making a testing library in C# and the library includes a method similar to "MyMethod".

Imagine:

  • a user has created a class which has several different methods,
  • the user is "using" my library in his/her C# script,
  • the user knows in advance that to be able to exploit the library, his/her methods names must contain a specific string (let's assume "test") ,
  • my library "MyMethod" is supposed to find those user defined methods that contain "test" as a part of their names (In the corresponding part of my code I am using Reflection, assembly, type, ... and "if(method.name contains "test")" so the library can detect those specific methods and pass them to its "MyMethod" individually),
  • Now, since we don't know what are those user defined methods signatures look like, the parameter of "MyMethod" should be in a way that it can handle any user defined method. That's why in my question in the first place I mentioned that "some_generic_method" (which is "MyMethod" parameter) may have different numbers of parameters with homogeneous/heterogeneous datatypes.

I hope this explanation makes the question clearer.

Thanks.

  • 7
    How do you want to call it within MyMethod if you don't know how many parameters there are? – Lee Nov 8 at 16:22
  • 2
    can you provide some example of those methods with a “different number of parameters with homogeneous datatypes”? – poke Nov 8 at 16:22
  • 9
    It would help if you could give us some context as to what you're trying to achieve, rather than how you're trying to achieve it. It's very possible there'll be a different approach that would work better. – Jon Skeet Nov 8 at 16:23
  • Relying on MyMethod to be able to handle, well, basically anything seems a bit smelly to me. Almost a potential XY situation. Could you perhaps give a couple concrete examples of what you're trying to do? – Broots Waymb Nov 8 at 16:23
  • do you want to parse method as a parameter???? – Udara Kasun Nov 8 at 16:29
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If you do this long enough, you'll eventually find yourself writing this function over and over:

    public static Type3 CombineFunc1AndFunc2(
   Func<Type1, Type2> func1,
   Func<Type2, Type3>> func2,
   Type1 input)
    {
   return func2(func1(input))
   }

Wrapper functions like this don't have much use when they're specialized to one type. However, if you introduce some type variables and omit the input parameter, then your GetFormattedRate definition looks like this:

public static Func<A, C> Compose(
   Func<B, C> outer, Func<A, B>> inner)
{
    return (input) => outer(inner(input))

}

var GetFormattedRate = Compose(FormatRate, GetRate);
var formattedRate = GetFormattedRate(rateKey);

As it stands, what you're doing has little purpose. It's not generic, so you need to duplicate that code all over the place. It overcomplicates your code because now your code has to assemble everything it needs from a thousand tiny functions on its own. Your heart's in the right place though: you just need to get used to using these sorts of generic higher order functions to put things together. Or, use a good old fashion lambda to turn Func and A into Func

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That "some_generic_method" may have different numbers of parameters with homogeneous datatypes.

The "homogenous datatypes" limitation helps a lot. We can define our new method with a single type argument:

public void MyMethod<T>(...)

Unfortunately, we can't quite get all the way there with a single method. We'll need an overload for each number of supported type arguments:

public void MyMethod<T>(Func<T> arg) { ... }
public void MyMethod<T>(Func<T,T> arg) { ... }
public void MyMethod<T>(Func<T,T,T> arg) { ... } 
// etc

If you look at the framework source, this is what the platform designers themselves had to do for things like delegates, Tuples, and params arguments.

But I wonder if you could adjust to do something like one of these:

public void MyMethod<T>(Func<IEnumerable<T>,T> arg) { ... }
public void MyMethod<T>(Func<T[],T> arg) { ... } 
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Consideration

There is no possibility to call a method without knowing its signature, as I know.

And in C# that is not like Javascript or Python or Ruby for example, a signature is static, definitively defined after compiled, so immutable.

Even using reflexion on an object as parameter, you will have the same problem to manage parameters of this unknown method having unknow parameters of unknown types.

C# is a strongly-typed language, a compiled language, even using dynamics.

C# Generics don't mean to not known types and signature, on the contrary, and they are not C++ Templates even these are ancestors.

Using params for parameters

https://docs.microsoft.com/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/keywords/params

public delegate void ParameterizedActionWithParams(params object[] parameters);

public void MyAction(ParameterizedActionWithParams action, params object[] parameters)
{
  if ( action != null )
    action(parameters);
  else
    ManageArgumentNullException();
}

Using a list of objects

public delegate void ParameterizedActionWithList(List<object> parameters);

public void MyAction(ParameterizedActionWithList action, List<object> parameters)
{
  if ( action != null )
    action(parameters);
  else
    ManageArgumentNullException();
}

Limitations

You can't have strong typed arguments.

And if you need functions too there is a problem if the returned parameter can vary and you only can do:

public delegate object ParameterizedFuncWithParams(params object[] parameters);

public delegate object ParameterizedFuncWithList(List<object> parameters);

So you need to create these variants:

public object MyFunc(ParameterizedFuncWithParams func, params object[] parameters)
{
  if ( func != null )
    return func(parameters);
  else
    ManageArgumentNullException();
}

public object MyFunc(ParameterizedFuncWithList func, List<object> parameters)
{
  if ( func != null )
    return func(parameters);
  else
    ManageArgumentNullException();
}

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