4

Asuming the following code is running in a seperate Thread:

try{
  var stuffToDispose = new SomeClassThatNeedsDisposing();
  //doing thing with stuffToDispose
}
finally{
   if(stuffToDispose != null)
     stuffToDispose.Dispose();
}

and this thread is aborted using the mechanic that raises the ThreadAbortException. Could the ThreadAbortException happen between the null-check and the Dispose()? Aka, in the middle of the finally block?

finally{
   if(stuffToDispose != null)
     //This is where the Exception would strike
     stuffToDispose.Dispose();
}

I am pretty sure the answer is no, but someone else seems convinced it is possible.

4

In .NET Framework ThreadAbortException is handled in a special way both in catch and finally blocks:

  • If a ThreadAbortException is caught, it is automatically re-raised at the end of the catch block (unless it is suppressed by Thread.ResetAbort)
  • In a finally block the ThreadAbortException will not be 'activated' until the end of the whole block. This is an intended behavior. And that's why you can find sometimes obscure codes with and empty try {} block where everything is in the finally section. It guarantees that this section will not be aborted.

On the other hand, .NET Core does not support Thread.Abort (throws a PlatformNotSupportedException). The ThreadAbortException itself has not been removed (for compatibility reasons) so you can still throw it explicitly but I don't think it is still handled as described above (I did not test it).

  • Wow, it means finally can be used to prevent abortion of some section? This is new to me and very helpfull! Though in <.NET 4 it will still be aborted.... – eocron Nov 9 at 12:37
  • Yes, at least until the end of the finally block. Which of course can be exploited badly as you can see from the examples. – György Kőszeg Nov 9 at 12:41
  • Aside from the CORE issue, this is exactly how I thought it would work once I read about the "can not be swallowed" protection/re-raising. – Christopher Nov 9 at 13:10
2

Finally will not be interrupted if

Running this code under .NET 4.0.0-4.7.2 will lock infinitelly on Thread.Abort() printing foo and hanging in finally:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var i = false;
        var t = new Thread(() =>
        {
            try { Console.Write("foo"); } finally { while (true) { i=true; } }
        });
        t.Start();
        Thread.Sleep(200);
        t.Abort();
        t.Join();
        Console.WriteLine("bar = {0}", i);
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Still, there is no guarantee that this will not execute sometimes in further versions.

Finally will be executed but interrupted if

Running same section under .NET 2.0-3.5 will print foobar = True, which implies it is interrupted.

But if you modify it like so:

        var t = new Thread(() =>
        {
            try { Console.Write("foo"); } finally { while (true) { Console.Write(".");} }
        });

It will run infinitelly like in first sample. This is ... strange.

Summary

Better to ask it dirrectly at Microsoft.

1

According to my tests, calling Thread.Abort does not interrupt a currently running finally block inside the thread.

Test code:

var thread = new Thread(() =>
{
    try
    {
    }
    catch (ThreadAbortException)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ThreadAbortException");
        throw;
    }
    finally
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Thread Finally Started");
        Thread.Sleep(200);
        Console.WriteLine("Thread Finally Finished");
    }
})
{ IsBackground = true };
thread.Start();
Thread.Sleep(100);
Console.WriteLine("Aborting...");
thread.Abort();
thread.Join();

Output (.NET Framework 4.8):

Thread Finally Started
Aborting...
Thread Finally Finished

Keep in mind that Thread.Abort is not supported on .NET Core.

System.PlatformNotSupportedException: Thread abort is not supported on this platform.

  • The strange things happens if you write something like while(true){ i++;} in finally and run under < .NET 4.0, it will be interrupted. Used your example. – eocron Nov 9 at 12:09
  • @eocron writing code for .NET Framework < 4.0 is sad anyway. No TPL, no async/await. How Thread.Abort behaves would be the least of my problems. :-) – Theodor Zoulias Nov 9 at 12:17
  • Yeah, but important to mention, to obsolete old answers =) Cause I believed in it's interruption up to 4.8 =) – eocron Nov 9 at 12:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.