-1

I am struggling to call a method in my User Model. I have a long method similar to this:

def find_content
  def find_x
  # call api
  end
  def find_y
  #call api
  end
  content = {"x": find_x, "y": find_y}
  return content
end

I then try to call it like this in my model:

class User < ApplicationRecord
  def User.news
    # get result of find_content
    content = find_content
    # I also tried doing User.find_content when the function was inside the model
    ## the function then passes the content variable to my UserMailer which sends emails to my users with the content
  end

I have tried placing my find_content in the User Model with def self.find_content and without the self part. I was wondering where is the best place to put a function that can be used like this in the model.

  • try to avoid class methods – Horacio Nov 9 at 13:16
  • 1
    "I am struggling to call a method" is not a precise enough error description for us to help you. What doesn't work? How doesn't it work? What trouble do you have with your code? Do you get an error message? What is the error message? Is the result you are getting not the result you are expecting? What result do you expect and why, what is the result you are getting and how do the two differ? Is the behavior you are observing not the desired behavior? What is the desired behavior and why, what is the observed behavior, and in what way do they differ? – Jörg W Mittag Nov 9 at 13:44
2

If I where are you I would create a Service class or a lib class, and I would call it.

Don't define your methods inside methods. Try something like this

class MyFancyService
  def find_content
    {"x": find_x, "y": find_y}
  end

  private
  def find_x
    #code
  end

  def find_y
    #code
  end
end

And inside your model

#remember to require your libs/services class in somewhere (maybe application.rb)
class User < ApplicationRecord
  def news
     MyFancyService.new.find_content    
  end
end

Do not abuse of Class method (def self.bla) you should have more instance methods.

  • Moving the find_content method into a separate class is good, but creating a new instance inside every method that needs it is bad. – nPn Nov 9 at 14:56
  • 1
    @nPn - I'm intrigued by "creating a new instance inside every method that needs it is bad." Do you have a reference on that? Or, can you characterize "bad"? "Bad" like "a little bad". Or "Bad" like "the sky opens up and swallows the Earth into a deep, permanent abyss of darkness where there is nothing but weeping and the gnashing of teeth" bad? – jvillian Nov 9 at 17:14
  • I was mainly thinking "bad" in the sense that every method that needs to find_content is tightly coupled to MyFancyService.new(). If something needs to change in MyFancyService, like say needing some parameter in the initialize method, then every method would need to change. Same applies to the case if you wanted to use the find_content method of a different service class, or even test the User class with a mock instance of MyFancyService. So basically MyFancyService is a dependency, and it would be nice if it could be injected into the classes were it is needed. – nPn Nov 9 at 18:53
  • @nPn there are a lot of way to avoid that (memoization or you may create an instance on initialize and use it before) but that it's depend on the context. Class methods smels like a poor POO design. – Horacio Nov 9 at 22:42
1

The reason you are having this issue is that finding content is not really a User concern and should be broken out into a separate class as Horacio mentions, but I don't think the User class needs to know anything about finding content. It is possible that you need some User info to properly find content however.

I would suggest something like this (assuming you need something from a User object to call your api)

class User      
  def user_stuff_needed_by_api
  end
end

class NewsAPI
    def initialize(user_stuff)
        # set stuff needed based on the user
    end
    def find_x
        # call api
        "x"
    end
    def find_y
        # call api
        "y"
    end
    def find_content
        {"x": find_x, "y": find_y}
    end
end

Then in your controller you have the user object, so get what you need from it, create an instance of the api and make your call

user_stuff = @user.user_stuff_needed_by_api
news_api = NewsAPI.new(user_stuff)
content = news_api.find_content

If you really want to make calls to the api inside your a User instance which I don't think you should, I would recommend passing in an instance of the api via a setter and then delegate find_content to that instance. So something like this.

class User
  def set_news_api(api)
    @news_api = api
  end
  def find_content
     @news_api.find_content
  end
end

Lastly if you really want to put all this in the User class something like this should work, but again is not recommended.

class User
  def self.find_x
    "xx"
    # call api
    end
  def self.find_y
    "yy"
    #call api
  end
  def find_content  
    {"x": self.class.find_x, "y": self.class.find_y}
  end
  def self.other_find_content
    {"other_x": find_x, "other_y": find_y}
  end
  def user_stuff_needed_by_api
  end
end

puts User.new.find_content
puts User.other_find_content
  • I like so +1, I tried to explain that he needs to split in two clases (at least) and he don need class methods. – Horacio Nov 9 at 22:52

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