5

Ok first off I'm very new to C++ so apologies if my understanding is poor. I'll try explain myself as best I can. What I have is I am using a library function that returns a std::shared_ptr<SomeObject>, I then have a different library function that takes a raw pointer argument (more specifically node-addon-api Napi::External<T>::New(Napi::Env env, T *data) static function). I want to create a Napi::External object using my std::shared_ptr. What I am currently doing is this:

{
    // ...
    std::shared_ptr<SomeObject> pSomeObject = something.CreateSomeObject();
    auto ext = Napi::External<SomeObject>::New(info.Env(), pSomeObject.get());
    auto instance = MyNapiObjectWrapper::Create({ ext });
    return instance;
}

But I am worried this will run into memory issues. My pSomeObject only exists in the current scope, so I imagine what should happen is after the return, it's reference count will drop to 0 and the SomeObject instance it points to will be destroyed and as such I will have issues with the instance I return which uses this object. However I have been able to run this code and call functions on SomeObject from my instance, so I'm thinking maybe my understanding is wrong.

My question is what should I do when given a shared pointer but I need to work off a raw pointer because of other third party library requirements? One option that was proposed to me was make a deep copy of the object and create a pointer to that

If my understanding on any of this is wrong please correct me, as I said I'm quite new to C++.

============================

Edit:

So I was missing from my original post info about ownership and what exactly this block is. The block is an instance method for an implementation I have for a Napi::ObjectWrap instance. This instance method needs to return an Napi::Object which will be available to the caller in node.js. I am using Napi::External as I need to pass a sub type of Napi::Value to the constructor New function when creating the Napi:Object I return, and I need the wrapped SomeObject object in the external which I extract in my MyNapiObjectWrapper constructor like so:

class MyNapiObjectWrapper
{
private:
    SomeObject* someObject;
    static Napi::FunctionReference constructor; // ignore for now
public:
    static void Init(Napi::Env env) {...}
    MyNapiObjectWrapper(const CallbackInfo& info)
    {
        Napi::Env env = info.Env();
        Napi::HandleScope scope(env);

        // My original code to match the above example
        this->someObject = info[0].As<const Napi::External<SomeObject>>().Data();
    }

    DoSomething()
    {
        this->someObject->DoSomething();
    }
}

I have since come to realise I can pass the address of the shared pointer when creating my external and use it as follows

// modified first sample
{{
    // ...
    std::shared_ptr<SomeObject> pSomeObject = something.CreateSomeObject();
    auto ext = Napi::External<SomeObject>::New(info.Env(), &pSomeObject);
    auto instance = MyNapiObjectWrapper::Create({ ext });
    return instance;
}

// modified second sample
class MyNapiObjectWrapper
{
private:
    std::shared_ptr<SomeObject> someObject;
    static Napi::FunctionReference constructor; // ignore for now
public:
    static void Init(Napi::Env env) {...}
    MyNapiObjectWrapper(const CallbackInfo& info)
    {
        Napi::Env env = info.Env();
        Napi::HandleScope scope(env);

        // My original code to match the above example
        this->someObject = 
            *info[0].As<const Napi::External<std::shared_ptr<SomeObject>>>().Data();
    }

    DoSomething()
    {
        this->someObject->DoSomething();
    }
}

So now I am passing a pointer to a shared_ptr to create my Napi::External, my question now though is this OK? Like I said at the start I'm new to c++ but this seems like a bit of a smell. However I tested it with some debugging and could see the reference count go up, so I'm thinking I'm in the clear???

  • 1
    We can't know the ownership of objects without seeing code you don't/can't include. Obviously the object owner by pSomeObject is destroyed at the end of the block. If any of the methods called don't expect this you will have UB. If however they deep copy the object pointed to by pSomeObject all will be OK. It's read the documentation time looking for ownership information. – Richard Critten Nov 9 at 14:22
  • I am not sure about what is happening in the CreateSomeObject function, they must maintain ownership of the object, as the SomeObject instance is not getting destroyed after the block. What is happening from my end is I create the External to wrap the some object, then I am passing the external to a Napi::ObjectWrapper (MyNapiObjectWrapper in the example above) so I can extract the pointer and keep it as a member variable. I can see why my code is wrong but I can't see yet how I should fix it. – Nick Hyland Nov 9 at 17:37
3

Here the important part of the documentation:

The Napi::External template class implements the ability to create a Napi::Value object with arbitrary C++ data. It is the user's responsibility to manage the memory for the arbitrary C++ data.

So you need to ensure that the object passed by data to Napi::External Napi::External::New exits until the Napi::External<T> object is destructed.

So the code that you have shown is not correct.

What you could do is to pass a Finalize callback to the New function:

static Napi::External Napi::External::New(napi_env env,
                    T* data,
                    Finalizer finalizeCallback);

And use a lambda function as Finalize, that lambda could hold a copy through the capture to the shared pointer allowing to keep the shared pointer alive until finalize is called.

std::shared_ptr<SomeObject> pSomeObject = something.CreateSomeObject();
auto ext = Napi::External<SomeObject>::New(
                  info.Env(), 
                  pSomeObject.get(),
                  [pSomeObject](Env /*env*/, SomeObject* data) {});
  • That would work, thank you. Although I think I would have to change my ObjectWrapper code. I am currently in the constructor getting the External and extracting the SomeObject pointer, then storing the SomeObject pointer as member variable. I would have to store the external as my member variable so the external wont get destroyed until my instance gets destroyed. – Nick Hyland Nov 9 at 17:46
  • @NickHyland I don't understand what you mean. The capture of the lambda ([pSomeObject]) creates a copy of pSomeObject and that copy is kept alive as long as the lambda is, and that should be until the Finalize callback is called. – t.niese Nov 9 at 20:10
  • Sorry I haven't actually made myself clear in that comment or probably my original post. In my constructor for MyNapiObjectWrapper to which the External is passed, I am just extracting the SomeObject pointer and storing that as a member variable. I am not holding a reference to the External passed to this, so I imagine the finalizer method would get called down along the line when the JS garbage collector kicks in. However I have since realised that my overall design was probably flawed so I have changed up my actual original implementation. Thanks for your help – Nick Hyland Nov 9 at 23:41
  • 1
    @NickHyland you can't downgrade from a shared_ptr to a managed raw pointer. there is no release like there is for unique_ptr. If your something.CreateSomeObject returns a unique_ptr - which should be the first choice when creating a factory function - then you would be able to release the object from being owned by the unique_ptr. It is not really possible to tell how to solve it in your case, because the exact use-case is not known. it is not clear why/how you use Napi::External, how the ownership over SomeObject is handled, ... – t.niese 2 days ago
  • 1
    @NickHyland and if you need to use Napi::External to pass a shared_ptr from on part of your application to another, then you could create wrapper with a member shared_ptr<SomeObject> value and Napi::External<SharedPtrWrapper>::New, but as I said with the given information it is not really possible to tell. – t.niese 2 days ago

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