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PS, I know what a pointer is and how to use one, but confused on one thing. I have already tried searching stackoverflow on this question:

int *ptr = 20 //why illegal or seg fault or crash?
printf("%i", *ptr) // Seg Fault
printf("%i", ptr) // Output -> 20
printf("%p", &ptr) // Returns a valid address.   

and found that, By directly assigning a value to a pointer without initializing with malloc or null, means that we are saying to the compiler, Hey CPU, Make a space in the memory to store an integer at the exact address given as value, which in this case 20. So basically saying to the compiler make a place for an INT in the ram with the address 20. By doing this we are touching system memory or illegal space.

But what I don't get is,

  1. How the integer 20 can directly be referenced as a memory?

  2. What happens when we do the same for float or char? for example float *ptr = 20.25

  3. I tried directly converting c code to assembly with a website, for a legal and illegal pointer example, where I see that the same registers are called, same MOV operations are done, And no explicit "MAKE SPACE AT given ADDRESS" instructions were set.

  4. Lastly, What exactly happens when we declare strings by doing char *ptr = "Hello"?

I have tried every possible way to understand this, but couldn't. Can you guys point me to the right direction? Thanks ...

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    You seem to think that (void*)0x20 is somehow semantically different than (void*)0x400000, but at the assembly level, a pointer is just a memory address. – Jonathon Reinhart Nov 10 '19 at 4:49
  • Btw the print("%p", &ptr) line is printing out the location of your ptr variable on the stack. – Jeremy Friesner Nov 10 '19 at 5:15
  • There are 4 questions in this question. And they're not even in any way related to each other except that they happen to have pointers. – Antti Haapala Nov 10 '19 at 5:53
  • And you've tagged the question with 2 wildly different programming languages. – Antti Haapala Nov 10 '19 at 5:54
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How the integer 20 can directly be referenced as a memory?

Using my C++ compiler, it doesn't compile: I get this error instead:

temp.cpp:22:14: error: cannot initialize a variable of type 'int *' with an
    rvalue of type 'int'
      int * x = 20;

It does compile as C, albeit with this warning:

temp.c:12:11: warning: incompatible integer to pointer conversion initializing
    'int *' with an expression of type 'int' [-Wint-conversion]
  int * x = 20;

However, this does compile under both C and C++:

   int * x = (int *) 20;

... it compiles because 20 is a well-formed memory-address (it specifies a memory location 20 bytes from the start of the process's memory space).

Note that on most operating systems it is not a usable memory-address though; most operating systems mark the first few pages of the address space as "unreadable/unwritable" specifically so that they can crash the process when someone tries to dereference a NULL-pointer (which otherwise would cause the process to read or write memory at a small offset from the start of the memory space)

What happens when we do the same for float or char? for example float *ptr = 20.25

Those types won't compile, because floating point (or char) values don't make sense as memory addresses. In most environments, memory addresses are integer offsets from the top of the memory space, so if you want to specify one as a constant (which btw you usually don't want to do, unless you are working at a very low level, e.g. addressing DMA hardware directly in an embedded controller), it needs to be an integer constant.

And no explicit "MAKE SPACE AT given ADDRESS" instructions were set.

That's to be expected -- setting a pointer to a value doesn't implicitly make space for anything, it only sets the pointer to point at the memory-address the constant specified.

Lastly, What exactly happens when we declare strings by doing char *ptr = "Hello"?

In this case, the compiler recognizes that you have declared a string-constant and adds that string as a read-only array to the process's memory-space. Having done that, it can then set the pointer to point to the start of that array. Note that this behavior is specific to string constants, and doesn't carry over to other data types like int or float.

Also note that it is the declaration of the string constant that triggers the addition of that constant, not the setting of the pointer to point at that constant. For example, if you had this code:

const char * s1 = "Hello";
const char * s2 = "Hello";
printf("s1=%p s2=%p\n", s1, s2);

... you will see output something like this:

s1=0x104608f4e s2=0x104608f4e

... note that both pointers are pointing to the same memory location; since the two strings are identical and read-only, the compiler is free to save memory by only allocating a single instance of the string-data.

Contrariwise, if you did this:

const char * x = (const char *) 20;

... you'd run into the exact same problems you saw with your int * example.

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Regarding C++:

int *ptr = 20 //why illegal or seg fault or crash?

This program is ill-formed. Compilers are not required to succesfully compile this program, and they are required to inform you of the issue. There is no implicit conversion from integer literal to pointer (except the literal zero).

  1. How the integer 20 can directly be referenced as a memory?

It cannot be referenced in general. Only if the memory at the address has been allocated, can the pointer be meaningfully used. Furthermore, some usage such as reading the value of the pointed object require that an object exists within its lifetime at the pointed address. Otherwise the behaviour of the program is undefined.

  1. What happens when we do the same for float or char?

Mostly the same as with pointer to int. Unless there is an object of compatible type at the pointed address, the behaviour is undefined when you access the object by indirecting through the pointer. char is slightly different in in that it is compatible with objects of all types. But even char cannot be used to read unallocated memory.

  1. ... no explicit "MAKE SPACE AT given ADDRESS" instructions were set.

Well, you didn't tell C++ to allocate any memory, so why would there be any "space made" at the given address?

  1. Lastly, What exactly happens when we declare strings by doing char *ptr = "Hello"?

The program will be ill-formed, since an array of const char doesn't implicitly convert to a pointer to non-const char. Unless standard is pre-C++11, in which case the program is well-formed due to such conversion existing. You would get a deprecation warning instead.

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  • Might be worth noting that const char * will work okay instead of char *. I guess you sort of mention that in a round about way already though (by mentioning pre-C++11). – user10957435 Nov 10 '19 at 5:16
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   int *ptr = 20 //why illegal or seg fault or crash?

It is illegal because C and C++ standards say so.

by directly assigning a value to a pointer without initializing with malloc or null, means that we are saying to the compiler, Hey CPU, Make a space in the memory to store an integer at the exact address given as value, which in this case 20.

Nothing like this happens. It is simply illegal, full stop.

How the integer 20 can directly be referenced as a memory?

This question is unclear.

What happens when we do the same for float or char? for example float *ptr = 20.25

It is just as illegal as the one above.

I tried directly converting c code to assembly with a website, for a legal and illegal pointer example, where I see that the same registers are called, same MOV operations are done, And no explicit "MAKE SPACE AT given ADDRESS" instructions were set.

There is normally no "MAKE SPACE AT given ADDRESS" instruction that can be contrilled by a C or C++ program.

What exactly happens when we declare strings by doing char *ptr = "Hello"?

In C++, the implementation produces a diagnostic message. What happens next depends on the implementation. In C, the implementation does whatever magic is necessary to cause ptr to point at the first character of a null-terminated character arrray that contains "Hello".

Now for the questions you didn't ask.

What happens in this line

       int *ptr = (int*)20;

The number 20 is is interpreted as an address and converted, in an implelmentation-defined way, to a pointer of type int*. No space is allocated at this address. ptr is just made to point there.

How can I allocate an int worth of memory at address 20?

You cannot as far as C and C++ languages go.

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