31

I'm trying to loop through a hash table and set the value of each key to 5 and PowerShell gives an error:

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

foreach($key in $myHash.keys){
    $myHash[$key] = 5
}

An error occurred while enumerating through a collection:

Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute..
At line:1 char:8
+ foreach <<<< ($key in $myHash.keys){
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (System.Collecti...tableEnumer
   ator:HashtableEnumerator) [], RuntimeException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : BadEnumeration

What gives and how do I resolve this problem?

10 Answers 10

47

You can't modify Hashtable while enumerating it. This is what you can do:

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

$myHash = $myHash.keys | foreach{$r=@{}}{$r[$_] = 5}{$r}

Edit 1

Is this any simpler for you:

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

foreach($key in $($myHash.keys)){
    $myHash[$key] = 5
}
  • 1
    Thanks zespri ---- that's brutally painful for what should be a straight forward operation.... – ted May 4 '11 at 7:26
  • Powershell is very flexible. There are many ways to accomplish the same thing. Admittedly, it takes time to learn, but once you are there this kind of stuff comes easy. I edited my answer to provide a way that may appear more intuitive for you. This resembles more the format you put it in originally. – Andrew Savinykh May 4 '11 at 7:38
  • @ted: you are welcome. You might want to accept the answer if it satisfies you. – Andrew Savinykh May 4 '11 at 9:19
  • 1
    This is the nature of enumerators. If you change the collection while you are enumerating, bad things could happen. Like skipping items, getting the same item twice, or worse. – JasonMArcher May 5 '11 at 16:28
  • 2
    @JasonMArcher: now I agree with you, but just for arguments sake, don't you think, that what you've described would be likely to happen if you add / remove items in collection while iterating. This logically should not be a problem for substituting one value to another? On the second thought, with Hashtable, changing value, means that the stored object might need to move to another bucket, and keeping this in mind, this behaviour can make sense. – Andrew Savinykh May 5 '11 at 20:17
13

There is a much simpler way of achieving this. You cannot change the value of a hashtable while enumerating it because of the fact that it's a reference type variable. It's exactly the same story in .NET.

Use the following syntax to get around it. We are converting the keys collection into a basic array using the @() notation. We make a copy of the keys collection, and reference that array instead which means we can now edit the hashtable.

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

foreach($key in @($myHash.keys)){
    $myHash[$key] = 5
}
  • Re: ` It's exactly the same story in .Net.` ... Powershell IS .NET. Just sayin. – Cheeso Mar 22 '17 at 23:00
  • Thank you for describing why you used the @() operator. It appears in another answer but they didn't explain what was going on. – Simon Tewsi Dec 31 '17 at 2:19
6

You do not need to clone the whole hashtable for this example. Just enumerating the key collection by forcing it to an array @(...) is enough:

foreach($key in @($myHash.keys)) {...

  • 1
    or we can use clone of keys (very similar)foreach($key in @($myHash.keys.clone()){.. – jmjarri Aug 24 '18 at 14:04
4

Use clone:

foreach($key in ($myHash.clone()).keys){
    $myHash[$key] = 5
}

Or in the one-liner:

$myHash = ($myHash.clone()).keys | % {} {$myHash[$_] = 5} {$myHash}
  • 1
    Can someone explain why I got -2 recently? It would be helpful. – Emiliano Poggi Jul 17 '14 at 13:38
  • this works. thanks. can you explain why the hashtable needs to be cloned before modifying the value – Sarath Rachuri Aug 10 '17 at 5:02
  • (Powershell v2 don't know for later versions) you cannot modify an hashtable while enumerating on it. – Emiliano Poggi Aug 23 '17 at 9:14
3

I'm new to PowerShell, but I'm quite a fan of using in-built functions, because I find it more readable. This is how I would tackle the problem, using GetEnumerator and Clone. This approach also allows one to reference to the existing hash values ($_.value) for modifying purposes.

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1 
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

$myHash.Clone().GetEnumerator() | foreach-object {$myHash.Set_Item($_.key, 5)}
3

You have to get creative!

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

$keys = @()
[array] $keys = $myHash.keys

foreach($key in $keys)
{
    $myHash.Set_Item($key, 5)
}

$myHash

Name                         Value
----                         -----
c                              5
a                              5
b                              5
  • 2
    You could improve the answer explaining why the OP script doesn't work. – mnencia Nov 12 '15 at 21:51
0

As mentioned in a previous answer, clone is the way to go. I had a need to replace any null values in a hash with "Unknown" nd this one-liner does the job.

($record.Clone()).keys | %{if ($record.$_ -eq $null) {$record.$_ = "Unknown"}}
0
$myHash = @{
    Americas = 0;
    Asia = 0;
    Europe = 0;
}

$countries = @("Americas", "Asia", "Europe", "Americas", "Asia")

foreach($key in $($myHash.Keys))
{
    foreach($Country in $countries)
    {
        if($key -eq $Country)
        {
            $myHash[$key] += 1
        }
    }
}

$myHash
  • Update Hash value when array and hash key has same value by one. The above code is works fine for me. – Dhanasekaran M Jun 14 at 7:51
0
$myHash = @{
    Americas = 0;
    Asia = 0;
    Europe = 0;
}

$countries = @("Americas", "Asia", "Europe", "Americas", "Asia")

foreach($key in $($myHash.Keys))
{
    foreach($Country in $countries)
    {
        if($key -eq $Country)
        {
            $myHash[$key] += 1
        }
    }
}

Updating a hash value if array elements matched with a hash key.

-1

It seems when you update the hash table inside the foreach loop, the enumerator invalidates itself. I got around this by populating a new hash table:

$myHash = @{}
$myHash["a"] = 1
$myHash["b"] = 2
$myHash["c"] = 3

$newHash = @{}
foreach($key in $myHash.keys){
    $newHash[$key] = 5
}
$myHash = $newHash
  • good idea, but it would be too slow for big dictionaries... – Artur Iwan Mar 4 '12 at 12:57

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