3

First of all, I am very basic at java. I am trying to browse a .txt file and load the contents of it, into the text area. I am completed the part, till which I receive the file from the JFileChooser, now I dont know how to do the remaining.

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File selFile = new File(fileChooser.getSelectedfile());
/// From here I want to load its content to a textarea "txtArea"
4
  • 2
    Every suggestion on this page gets a -1. All text components have a read(...) method. There is no reason to create looping code or buffers or anything. Its one line of code to populate a text area. Yes the solutions here will work for read only files but they will not work if you ever want to write out the text in the text area to a file. Everybody is forcing the newline character to be a "\n". The read method will track the newline string as the file is read and then use that for output when the file is written.
    – camickr
    May 4 '11 at 15:41
  • @camickr: There is no read() method in the TextArea class or any of its descendants. Also the newline needs to be '\n' as that is what is used internally by these classes. I would suggest you retract your downvotes and get your facts straight before you start blitzing over everyones answers.
    – trojanfoe
    May 4 '11 at 16:21
  • 2
    This is a Swing related question since the poster is using JFileChooser. All Swing text components support a read() method which they inherit from JTextComponent. The read() method parses the text as it is read from the file and inserts the "\n" into the Document. However it also tracks the actual newline string found in the file so that string can be used if you ever need to rewrite the file. So it will preserve the proper new line string. See: tips4java.wordpress.com/2009/02/07/text-and-new-lines which discusses this issue briefly.
    – camickr
    May 4 '11 at 17:10
  • 6
    @camickr, SO is not designed to hide answers inside comments. If you believe the other answers are incorrect, and what you've described above is the way to go, then please move your suggestion into an actual answer.
    – Kirk Woll
    May 4 '11 at 17:15
11

Use the read(...) and write(...) methods that are suppoorted by all Swing text components. Simple example:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.io.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.text.*;

class TextAreaLoad
{
    public static void main(String a[])
    {
        final JTextArea edit = new JTextArea(10, 60);
        edit.setText("one\ntwo\nthree");
        edit.append("\nfour\nfive");

        JButton read = new JButton("Read TextAreaLoad.txt");
        read.addActionListener( new ActionListener()
        {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                try
                {
                    FileReader reader = new FileReader( "TextAreaLoad.txt" );
                    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(reader);
                    edit.read( br, null );
                    br.close();
                    edit.requestFocus();
                }
                catch(Exception e2) { System.out.println(e2); }
            }
        });

        JButton write = new JButton("Write TextAreaLoad.txt");
        write.addActionListener( new ActionListener()
        {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
            {
                try
                {
                    FileWriter writer = new FileWriter( "TextAreaLoad.txt" );
                    BufferedWriter bw = new BufferedWriter( writer );
                    edit.write( bw );
                    bw.close();
                    edit.setText("");
                    edit.requestFocus();
                }
                catch(Exception e2) {}
            }
        });

        JFrame frame = new JFrame("TextArea Load");
        frame.getContentPane().add( new JScrollPane(edit), BorderLayout.NORTH );
        frame.getContentPane().add(read, BorderLayout.WEST);
        frame.getContentPane().add(write, BorderLayout.EAST);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo( null );
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }
}
2
BufferedReader in = null;
try {
    in = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(selFile));
    String str;
    while ((str = in.readLine()) != null) {
        jtextArea.append(str);
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
} finally {
    try { in.close(); } catch (Exception ex) { }
}
6
  • Might want to move that in.close() to a finally block.
    – Qwerky
    May 4 '11 at 7:56
  • It does not maintain the indentation, and line breaks.
    – mrN
    May 4 '11 at 7:57
  • @Qwerky, I tried moving the in.close() to the finally block. But it gives error telling cannot find symbol in
    – mrN
    May 4 '11 at 7:59
  • @mrN because in was declared in the try block. Moving the declaration before the try and the in.close into a finally will work. But don't forget to check if it is null before closing
    – hage
    May 4 '11 at 8:02
  • @hage, I will try to do that, but what about the line breaks and indentation.
    – mrN
    May 4 '11 at 8:10
0

For indentation and line break you have to use "\n" before appending to to the text area..

  BufferedReader buff = null;
  try {
       buff = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(selFile));
       String str;
       while ((str = buff.readLine()) != null) {
       jtextArea.append("\n"+str);
   }
 } catch (IOException e) {
  } finally {
    try { in.close(); } catch (Exception ex) { }
    }
-1

Use a BufferedReader to read the .txt file line by line. You can then append each line to your text area.

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